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What are undefined reference/unresolved external symbol errors? What are common causes and how to fix/prevent them?

Feel free to edit/add your own.

  • @LuchianGrigore 'feel free to add an answer' I preferred to add the relevant link (IMHO) your primary answer, if you'd like to permit. – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 3 '14 at 22:36
  • @jave.web: While that does happen, the programmer usually notices that he has no this pointer and no access to class members. It's quite rare to complete compilation and only fail during linking, when a non-static member function is missing its qualified-name. – Ben Voigt Apr 27 '15 at 22:06
  • @jave.web: This was exactly my problem. Thank you! I am new to cpp, but as far as I can tell, I was having the exact problem that Ben Voigt says was quite rare. I think your solution would make a great answer. – RoG Oct 20 '16 at 6:42
  • @Snaptastic see stackoverflow.com/a/12574407/673730 - A common mistake is forgetting to qualify the name :) – Luchian Grigore Oct 20 '16 at 19:59
  • I had an error where my project was compiled as x64 project. and I've used a Library that was compiled as x86. I've recompiled the library as x64 and it solved it. – Gal Bracha Feb 6 '17 at 13:55

33 Answers 33

0

Functions or class-methods are defined in source files with the inline specifier.

An example:-

main.cpp

#include "gum.h"
#include "foo.h"

int main()
{
    gum();
    foo f;
    f.bar();
    return 0;
}

foo.h (1)

#pragma once

struct foo {
    void bar() const;
};

gum.h (1)

#pragma once

extern void gum();

foo.cpp (1)

#include "foo.h"
#include <iostream>

inline /* <- wrong! */ void foo::bar() const {
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
}

gum.cpp (1)

#include "gum.h"
#include <iostream>

inline /* <- wrong! */ void gum()
{
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
}

If you specify that gum (similarly, foo::bar) is inline at its definition then the compiler will inline gum (if it chooses to), by:-

  • not emitting any unique definition of gum, and therefore
  • not emitting any symbol by which the linker can refer to the definition of gum, and instead
  • replacing all calls to gum with inline copies of the compiled body of gum.

As a result, if you define gum inline in a source file gum.cpp, it is compiled to an object file gum.o in which all calls to gum are inlined and no symbol is defined by which the linker can refer to gum. When you link gum.o into a program together with another object file, e.g. main.o that make references to an external symbol gum, the linker cannot resolve those references. So the linkage fails:

Compile:

g++ -c  main.cpp foo.cpp gum.cpp

Link:

$ g++ -o prog main.o foo.o gum.o
main.o: In function `main':
main.cpp:(.text+0x18): undefined reference to `gum()'
main.cpp:(.text+0x24): undefined reference to `foo::bar() const'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

You can only define gum as inline if the compiler can see its definition in every source file in which gum may be called. That means its inline definition needs to exist in a header file that you include in every source file you compile in which gum may be called. Do one of two things:

Either don't inline the definitions

Remove the inline specifier from the source file definition:

foo.cpp (2)

#include "foo.h"
#include <iostream>

void foo::bar() const {
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
}

gum.cpp (2)

#include "gum.h"
#include <iostream>

void gum()
{
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
}

Rebuild with that:

$ g++ -c  main.cpp foo.cpp gum.cpp
imk@imk-Inspiron-7559:~/develop/so/scrap1$ g++ -o prog main.o foo.o gum.o
imk@imk-Inspiron-7559:~/develop/so/scrap1$ ./prog
void gum()
void foo::bar() const

Success.

Or inline correctly

Inline definitions in header files:

foo.h (2)

#pragma once
#include <iostream>

struct foo {
    void bar() const  { // In-class definition is implicitly inline
        std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
    }
};
// Alternatively...
#if 0
struct foo {
    void bar() const;
};
inline void foo::bar() const  {
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
}
#endif

gum.h (2)

#pragma once
#include <iostream>

inline void gum() {
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
}

Now we don't need foo.cpp or gum.cpp:

$ g++ -c main.cpp
$ g++ -o prog main.o
$ ./prog
void gum()
void foo::bar() const
0
  • The code can be compiled as is, with g++44 (Red Hat 4.4.7-8)

Ubuntu has a Debian patched gcc-4.4 / g++-4.4 : No good with this code (and some other ns2 code / patches too.)

Ubuntu : mpolsr_umolsr-v1_ns235.patchhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7S...ew?usp=sharing ( created year 2017 with the mpolsr code, no changes.)

tar xvf ns-allinone-2.35_gcc5.tar.gz

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7S...ew?usp=sharing

cd ns-allinone-2.35/
patch -p0 < mpolsr_umolsr-v1_ns235.patch  // umolsr version v1.0 is used
./install
              // Stops with MPOLSR.cc
cd ns-2.35/
              // Edit the Makefile line 37 to CPP = g++34 , and run make
make
              // When 'make' stops with an mdart/* error, change to CPP = g++-4.4
make

gcc34 Ubuntu https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7S255p3kFXNRTkzQnRSNXZ6UVU/view?usp=sharing

g++34 Ubuntu https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7S255p3kFXNV3J3bnVoWGNWdG8/view?usp=sharing

  • This does not answer the question – Adrian W Jun 20 at 17:52
-1

The error occurs when the linker could not find any definition to a definition in declaration file i.e. from an header file or declaration file. It occurs when the implementation is not found.

After compilation the a linker tries to find the implementations from a library or a for a virtual function or for a template definition. If it doesnt find one then, these errors occur according to the linker architecture.

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