22

I just need to pass any HTML content as a command line argument which includes characters like ', " , ` and what not? How can I pass this as a single argument in unix?

0

4 Answers 4

22

If you were typing at the command line, you could use the following hack:

some_program -some_option some_argument "$(cat)"
any text you like with ` or " or $ or < or whatever
^D

The last thing is control-D (end of file)

To put that into a bash script, you can use a Here document:

some_program -some_option some_argument "$(cat <<'EOF'
any text you like with ` or " or $ or < or whatever
EOF
)"

That will work as long as the text is not exactly the characters EOF (and if it is, you just have to change EOF in both places to something else).

But I don't think either of those are what you want to do. I think you are trying to invoke a program from another program (in Lua). Unfortunately, Lua out-of-the-box does not provide any function which can do that. It only provides os.execute, which uses the shell (/bin/sh, not bash) to interpret the command line.

There was a nice implementation for Lua of spawn written by Mark Edgar, but I don't know if it is still maintained. Failing that, you can still use the second hack:

require("os")

function call_with_arg(prog, rawtext)
  return os.execute(prog.." \"$(cat <<'EOF'\n"..rawtext.."\nEOF\n)\"")
end
local html =
  [=[<html><body><img src="image.png" onload='alert("loaded")'/></body></html>]=]

call_with_arg("echo >somefile.txt", html)        
1
  • And how to join Here-doc's result back, to get a single line?
    – Top-Master
    Commented Apr 25, 2023 at 4:38
8

I was looking for an answer to the question but I don't really see it here, so here is the solution I ended up with (not I'm not passing HTML or things like that, but similar)

for example the psql tools takes commands that can be multi lines, but they need to be passed in a double quoted string.

I started with other answers that recommended the following:

CMD=$(cat << EOM
CREATE TABLE mytable
        (
          id bigint NOT NULL,
          sid bigint NOT NULL,
          obs timestamp without time zone NOT NULL,
          rcv timestamp without time zone NOT NULL,
          uid bigint NOT NULL,
          CONSTRAINT pkey PRIMARY KEY (id)
        )
EOM
)

sudo -u postgres psql db -c $CMD

but that doesn't work because the command is now missing the quotes, and using "$CMD" doesn't remove the newlines so it is passed as multiline still...

however

echo $CMD will print the command in a single line

so in the end using:

CMD=$(echo $(cat << EOM
CREATE TABLE mytable
            (
              id bigint NOT NULL,
              sid bigint NOT NULL,
              obs timestamp without time zone NOT NULL,
              rcv timestamp without time zone NOT NULL,
              uid bigint NOT NULL,
              CONSTRAINT pkey PRIMARY KEY (id)
            )
EOM
))

sudo -u postgres psql db -c "$CMD"

actually wraps the line in double quotes, into a single line command.

I hope this is useful to others.

2
  • What is EOM? Please explain.
    – logicbloke
    Commented Jun 1, 2022 at 16:47
  • 1
    EOM is just a delimiter, but it can be anything you want. It is often EOF (end of file) or EOL (end of line). I think I used EOM for End of Macro. Anyway, whatever word you use, the only constraint is that the beginning and end match.
    – MrE
    Commented Jun 2, 2022 at 23:54
2

If i understand your requirement correctly, you can pass any thing in double quotes from command line i.e. "". It would be treated as a single argument and received in the program as a string, which can be parsed according to needs.

Here is a c program

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int c, char *argv[])
{
        printf("argument is %s\n", argv[1]);
        return 0;
}

On console, i compiled and ran it with

$ gcc args.c
$ ./a.out "<img src=\"image.png\" onload='alert(/loaded/)' />"

Output is

argument is

 <img src="image.png" onload='alert(/loaded/)' />

For special characters such as "" (double quotes), backslash \ etc. inside the argument, just prefix those with an extra escape sequence \

9
  • Well ! What if my argument is something like, <img src="image.png" onload='alert(/loaded/)' /> ? Will this still work?
    – Cookies
    Commented Sep 25, 2012 at 6:04
  • Yes it will. I just verified through a program. Will post it in the solution. Done
    – fkl
    Commented Sep 25, 2012 at 6:10
  • 2
    There are a number of characters that need to be escaped when they occur inside a double-quoted string, including double-quotes themselves. Note that the string printed out without quotes around image.png. If you ran it as ./a.out "<img src=\"image.png\" onload='alert(/loaded/)' />" the double-quotes would be included in the argument. Commented Sep 25, 2012 at 6:17
  • 1
    Well you have to specify to the program a way to interpret characters. There is no special encoding here. So i don't think there is any way. Why would you need one?
    – fkl
    Commented Sep 25, 2012 at 6:36
  • 1
    Also note that newlines are treated differently depending on the shell. In csh and csh variants, newlines are special characters and must be escaped, while in bourne shells the `` preceding a newline is optional. Commented Sep 25, 2012 at 11:53
2

This worked for me.

Here's the multiline text in a file (setup.json), with internal double quotes for example:

{
   "fieldA": "foo"
}

and here's how to send it as a single argument:

setup=$(cat setup.json)
./my_util "$setup"

Use the c program (other answer) from @fayyazkl to test it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.