28

I have a bunch of automatically generated JSON files that I want to store in version control. The problem is that each time the files are serialized, the attributes come out in a different order, making it hard to know if the files have really changed and / or what the real differences are.

Does anyone know of an existing open source tool that will perform this task?

Failing that, does anyone know of a JSON library with a parser and a generator that can be configured to output "pretty" JSON with the attributes in (say) lexical order? (A Java or Ruby library would be ideal, but other leads are also welcome.)

16

Python's JSON module is very usable from other programs:

generate_json | python -mjson.tool > canonical.json
  • 12
    Note: this works because sort_keys=True in the implementation of json.tool, but this guarantee doesn't appear to be documented anywhere, so it may be worth writing your own script which can make that guarantee: import json, sys; print json.dumps(json.load(sys.stdin), sort_keys=True) – David Wolever Jun 30 '13 at 0:03
4

If you're willing to go through a bit of overhead by calling

gson.toJson(canonicalize(gson.toJsonTree(obj)));

Then you can do something like this:

protected static JsonElement canonicalize(JsonElement src) {
  if (src instanceof JsonArray) {
    // Canonicalize each element of the array
    JsonArray srcArray = (JsonArray)src;
    JsonArray result = new JsonArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < srcArray.size(); i++) {
      result.add(canonicalize(srcArray.get(i)));
    }
    return result;
  } else if (src instanceof JsonObject) {
    // Sort the attributes by name, and the canonicalize each element of the object
    JsonObject srcObject = (JsonObject)src;
    JsonObject result = new JsonObject();
    TreeSet<String> attributes = new TreeSet<>();
    for (Map.Entry<String, JsonElement> entry : srcObject.entrySet()) {
      attributes.add(entry.getKey());
    }
    for (String attribute : attributes) {
      result.add(attribute, canonicalize(srcObject.get(attribute)));
    }
    return result;
  } else {
    return src;
  }
}
1

This is supported in Jackson:

@JsonPropertyOrder(alphabetic=true)

http://fasterxml.github.io/jackson-annotations/javadoc/2.3.0/com/fasterxml/jackson/annotation/JsonPropertyOrder.html

0

The open source Java library Jackson might take some effort to set up, but is capable of pretty printing and has a pretty neat @JsonPropertyOrder annotation which supports alphabetic or manually specified output order.

  • 1
    Can that annotation be used on JSON that you load as a tree of TreeNode instances? I don't have Java Pojo classes ... or a JSON schema to play with. These are generic JSON files with unpredictable structure and contents. – Stephen C Sep 25 '12 at 14:33
  • Unfortunately, I haven't gone down that road. The "might take some effort" part in my answer was there with POJO definition and Jackson's SerializationConfig mechanism in mind. – Gustav Barkefors Sep 25 '12 at 14:40
0

I have not tried a lot of combinations, but it seems like google-gson keeps the order of attributes in JSON.

removed an example here as it was not relevant anymore

I know from experience in previous projects that it is extremely customizable, for example if the base object is not enough, one can use GsonBuilder to create more complicated adapters.

I have not however tested this extensively with your use-case, but it should be simple to check if it has the expected output

UPDATE

rather than using SVN/CVS to check if your files were modified, I found that GSON has built-in versioning support which may or may not address your issue, from their docs:

Multiple versions of the same object can be maintained by using @Since annotation. This annotation can be used on Classes, Fields and, in a future release, Methods. In order to leverage this feature, you must configure your Gson instance to ignore any field/object that is greater than some version number. If no version is set on the Gson instance then it will serialize and deserialize all fields and classes regardless of the version.

UPDATE

The only other thing I can think of is parsing your external files with rhino and using JSON.stringify to convert the parsed JSON back to a string, then you can be sure it has run through a single 'parser' and the output won't differ.

You can then detect any possible changes.

  • The @Since annotation is unlikely to help. These JSON files are coming from an external source (not Java). – Stephen C Sep 25 '12 at 14:51
  • @StephenC, i understand your problem more clearly now, see my update – epoch Sep 25 '12 at 18:20
0

Ruby 1.9+ maintains the insertion order of hashes, and JSON for 1.9+ honors that.

asdf = {'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}
asdf.to_json # => "{\"a\":1,\"b\":2}"

asdf = {'b' => 1, 'a' => 2}
asdf.to_json # => "{\"b\":1,\"a\":2}"

Here's how to generate a "pretty" format:

asdf = {'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}
puts JSON.pretty_generate(asdf)
{
  "a": 1,
  "b": 2
}

asdf = {'b' => 1, 'a' => 2}
irb(main):022:0> puts JSON.pretty_generate(asdf)
{
  "b": 1,
  "a": 2
}

... the same attributes are being inserted in a different order...

This doesn't make much sense to me, but I'm going to take a shot.

Because Ruby maintains insertion order, it isn't too important what the order of the data is if you create the hash in a given order; Force the order by sorting the keys and regenerate the hash, and pass that to JSON:

require 'json'

puts Hash[{'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}.sort_by{ |a| a }].to_json
=> {"a":1,"b":2}

puts Hash[{'b' => 2, 'a' => 1}.sort_by{ |a| a }].to_json
=> {"a":1,"b":2}

puts Hash[{'b' => 2, 'c' => 3, 'a' => 1}.sort_by{ |a| a }].to_json
=> {"a":1,"b":2,"c":3}

puts Hash[{'b' => 2, 'c' => 3, 'a' => 1}.sort_by{ |a| a }].to_json
=> {"a":1,"b":2,"c":3}

puts Hash[{'a' => 1, 'c' => 3, 'b' => 2}.sort_by{ |a| a }].to_json
=> {"a":1,"b":2,"c":3}
  • Maintaining the insertion order is not sufficient if the same attributes are being inserted in a different order. (In fact, these hash are coming from a Ruby script that uses to_json.) – Stephen C Sep 25 '12 at 23:14
  • "the same attributes are being inserted in a different order". Please update your question explaining what you mean by this. – the Tin Man Sep 26 '12 at 0:52
0

Here's a simple JSON encoder in Qt -- should be relatively easy to recast into Java. All you really need to do is to make sure the keys are sorted when writing out -- can read in with another JSON package.

QString QvJson::encodeJson(const QVariant& jsonObject) {
    QVariant::Type type = jsonObject.type();
    switch (type) {
        case QVariant::Map: 
            return encodeObject(jsonObject);
        case QVariant::List:
            return encodeArray(jsonObject);
        case QVariant::String:
            return encodeString(jsonObject);
        case QVariant::Int:
        case QVariant::Double:
            return encodeNumeric(jsonObject);
        case QVariant::Bool:
            return encodeBool(jsonObject);
        case QVariant::Invalid:
            return encodeNull(jsonObject);
        default:
            return encodingError("encodeJson", jsonObject, ErrorUnrecognizedObject);
    }
}

QString QvJson::encodeObject(const QVariant& jsonObject) {
    QString result("{ ");
    QMap<QString, QVariant> map = jsonObject.toMap();
    QMapIterator<QString, QVariant> i(map);
    while (i.hasNext()) {
        i.next();
        result.append(encodeString(i.key()));

        result.append(" : ");

        result.append(encodeJson(i.value()));

        if (i.hasNext()) {
            result.append(", ");
        }
    }
    result.append(" }");
    return result;
}

QString QvJson::encodeArray(const QVariant& jsonObject) {
    QString result("[ ");
    QList<QVariant> list = jsonObject.toList();
    for (int i = 0; i < list.count(); i++) {
        result.append(encodeJson(list.at(i)));
        if (i+1 < list.count()) {
            result.append(", ");
        }
    }
    result.append(" ]");
    return result;
}

QString QvJson::encodeString(const QVariant &jsonObject) {
    return encodeString(jsonObject.toString());
}

QString QvJson::encodeString(const QString& value) {
    QString result = "\"";
    for (int i = 0; i < value.count(); i++) {
        ushort chr = value.at(i).unicode();
        if (chr < 32) {
            switch (chr) {
                case '\b':
                    result.append("\\b");
                    break;
                case '\f':
                    result.append("\\f");
                    break;
                case '\n':
                    result.append("\\n");
                    break;
                case '\r':
                    result.append("\\r");
                    break;
                case '\t':
                    result.append("\\t");
                    break;
                default:
                    result.append("\\u");
                    result.append(QString::number(chr, 16).rightJustified(4, '0'));
            }  // End switch
        }
        else if (chr > 255) {
            result.append("\\u");
            result.append(QString::number(chr, 16).rightJustified(4, '0'));
        }
        else {
            result.append(value.at(i));
        }
    }
    result.append('"');
    QString displayResult = result;  // For debug, since "result" often doesn't show
    Q_UNUSED(displayResult);
    return result;
}

QString QvJson::encodeNumeric(const QVariant& jsonObject) {
    return jsonObject.toString();
}

QString QvJson::encodeBool(const QVariant& jsonObject) {
    return jsonObject.toString();
}

QString QvJson::encodeNull(const QVariant& jsonObject) {
    return "null";
}

QString QvJson::encodingError(const QString& method, const QVariant& jsonObject, Error error) {
    QString text;
    switch (error) {
        case ErrorUnrecognizedObject: 
            text = QObject::tr("Unrecognized object type");
            break;
    default:
            Q_ASSERT(false);
    }
    return QObject::tr("*** Error %1 in QvJson::%2 -- %3").arg(error).arg(method).arg(text);
}
0

Sort the keys of the objects that you are serializing before outputting them. In Ruby 1.9 hashes are ordered by default; in Ruby 1.8 they're not. You can use OrderedHash from active_support to be sure in either case.

Whenever you are going to write your JSON data, sort the keys. Note that in Ruby 1.8, symbols cannot be sorted, so you have to call to_s in your sort.

require 'rubygems'
require 'json'
require 'active_support/ordered_hash'

obj = {
  :fig => false,
  :bananas => false,
  :apples => true,
  :eggplant => true,
  :cantaloupe => true,
  :dragonfruit => false
}

def sorted_hash(hsh)
  sorted_keys = hsh.keys.sort_by { |k| k.to_s }
  sorted_keys.inject(ActiveSupport::OrderedHash.new) do |o_hsh, k|
    o_hsh[k] = hsh[k]
    o_hsh
  end
end

puts JSON.pretty_generate(obj)
# Could output in any order, depending on version of Ruby
# {
#   "eggplant": true,
#   "cantaloupe": true,
#   "dragonfruit": false,
#   "fig": false,
#   "bananas": false,
#   "apples": true
# }

puts JSON.pretty_generate(sorted_hash(obj))
# Always output in the same order
# {
#   "apples": true,
#   "bananas": false,
#   "cantaloupe": true,
#   "dragonfruit": false,
#   "eggplant": true,
#   "fig": false
# }

If your data consists of an array of objects or nested objects, you'll need to create sorted hashes recursively:

nested_obj = {:a => {:d => true, :b => false}, :e => {:k => false, :f => true}, :c => {:z => false, :o => true}}

def recursive_sorted_hash(hsh)
  sorted_keys = hsh.keys.sort_by { |k| k.to_s }
  sorted_keys.inject(ActiveSupport::OrderedHash.new) do |o_hsh, k|
    o_hsh[k] = hsh[k].is_a?(Hash) ? recursive_sorted_hash(hsh[k]) : hsh[k]
    o_hsh
  end
end

puts JSON.pretty_generate(nested_obj)
# Again, could be in any order
# {
#   "a": {
#     "b": false,
#     "d": true
#   },
#   "e": {
#     "f": true,
#     "k": false
#   },
#   "c": {
#     "z": false,
#     "o": true
#   }
# }

puts JSON.pretty_generate(recursive_sorted_hash(nested_obj))
# Even nested hashes are in alphabetical order
# {
#   "a": {
#     "b": false,
#     "d": true
#   },
#   "c": {
#     "o": true,
#     "z": false
#   },
#   "e": {
#     "f": true,
#     "k": false
#   }
# }

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