4

I have an object filled with various elements that I wish to iterate through using each() and then perform an action on the element whose turn it is. So:

var arts = $("#press-sqs > article");
shuffle(arts);

$(arts).each(function(){
    setInterval(function() {
    // in here perform an action on the current element in 'arts'
    }, 2000);   
}); 

( shuffle() is a basic shuffle function )

What I can't figure out is how to access the current element as a selector and perform an action on it. $(this) is $(window).

Finally I would then need the function to start the iteration again once it reaches the end of art and keep on looping ad infinitum.

10

If you're using setInterval, you'd get identical results swapping the order:

setInterval(function() {
    $(arts).each(function(){
         doSomethingWith(this);
    });   
}, 2000);

I don't think you want what you think you do here. I reckon you want:

var i = 0;
setInterval(function() {
    var art = arts[i++];
    doSomethingWith(art)
    if(i >= arts.length) i = 0;
}, 2000); 
  • clever chap, you figured out what I meant. I don't think I made it especially clear but this is the exact result. Thanks – artparks Sep 25 '12 at 18:19
  • 1
    I disagree that results are "identical" when swapping the order (elements would be processed in a different order), but I bet you're right about the "real" intention. (edit: and turns out, you were!) – Will Palmer Sep 25 '12 at 18:21
  • Any chance you could explain what's happening in that second sample? – artparks Sep 25 '12 at 18:22
  • @artparks: Which bit are you having trouble with? i is just an index into the array, which gets incremented every 2 seconds. – Eric Sep 25 '12 at 18:37
  • @WillPalmer: Is there a defined order for the original case? I guess you could argue that the difference is whether the order is defined. – Eric Sep 25 '12 at 18:37
3

jQuery's .each(...) method passes the "current" element (and its index) into the callback. this is just a convenience for when you don't need to do anything too complicated.

$(arts).each(function(i, current){
    setInterval(function() {
    // in here perform an action on the current element in 'arts'
    }, 2000);   
});

Above, the current element is available within the setInterval callback as current, for example. Note that this element is passed in its "raw" form, as this is, so if you want to call jQuery methods on it, you'll need to wrap it in the same way, ie: $(current).

2

Use that.

$(arts).each(function(){
    var that = this;
    setInterval(function() {
    // in here perform an action on the current element in 'arts'
         doSomethingWith(that)
    }, 2000);   
});
  • 1
    doesn't seem to work... $(that).children(".sq-logo").hide(); for example hides all the children with that class, not just the children of the element currently being iterated – artparks Sep 25 '12 at 18:11
  • 1
    @artparks: That's because you iterate your elements immediately! – Eric Sep 25 '12 at 18:16
  • Most likely what you really want is a setInterval around the each, and a setTimeout inside the each with a delay based on index. – Kevin B Sep 25 '12 at 18:20

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