8

I have an enum like the one below, but eclipse says that there are errors in the first definition of each opposite pair.

public enum Baz{
  yin(yang),    //Cannot reference a field before it is defined
  yang(yin),
  good(evil),   //Cannot reference a field before it is defined
  evil(good);

  public final Baz opposite;

  Baz(Baz opposite){
    this.opposite = opposite;
  }
}

What I want to accomplish is being able to use Baz.something.opposite to get the opposite object of Baz.something. Is there a possible workaround for this? Maybe an empty placeholder for yang and bad before yin and good are defined in this example?

11

You could try something like:

public enum Baz{
  yin("yang"),    
  yang("yin"),
  good("evil"),   
  evil("good");

  private String opposite;

  Baz(String opposite){
    this.opposite = opposite;
  }

  public Baz getOpposite(){
     return Baz.valueOf(opposite);
  }
}

and then reference it as

Baz.something.getOpposite()

That should accomplish what you are looking to do by looking up the enum value by it's string representation. I don't think you can get it to work with the recursive reference to Baz.

  • +1 You're right, you can't get it to work using the actual objects because evil won't be defined until after good is already initialized, but switching them doesn't work because then good isn't defined when evil is initialized. Good idea to use the names :) – Brian Sep 25 '12 at 23:08
  • 2
    Replacing typed enum values with untyped strings is not a good solution. The whole point of enums is to gave type safety to constants, and strings do not give you that. Plus, there is a much better solutions - doing this in a static initializer block, as @meriton points out in his answer. – Erwin Bolwidt Dec 20 '16 at 13:00
12

With the switch statement:

public enum Baz{
  yin,
  yang,
  good,
  evil;

  public Baz getOpposite() {
    switch (this) {
        case yin: return yang;
        case yang: return yin;
        case good: return evil;
        case evil: return good;
    }
    throw new AssertionError();
}

Or deferred initialization:

public enum Baz{
  yin,
  yang,
  good,
  evil;

  public Baz opposite;

  static {
    yin.opposite = yang;
    yang.opposite = yin;
    good.opposite = evil;
    evil.opposite = good;
  }
}

You might wish to make the mutable field private and provide a getter.

  • I had not heard of deferred initialization, this seems like a good solution, but jcern's String version seems like the best method. – Zaq Sep 25 '12 at 23:43
  • 2
    +1 For your second suggestion. Hate the switch idea. – OldCurmudgeon Sep 26 '12 at 0:01
  • 1
    Plus 1 for static initialization – Steven Solomon Mar 17 '17 at 23:20
3

How about an EnumMap?

public enum Baz {
  yin,
  yang,
  good,
  evil;
  private static final Map<Baz, Baz> opposites = new EnumMap<Baz, Baz>(Baz.class);

  static {
    opposites.put(yin, yang);
    opposites.put(yang, yin);
    opposites.put(good, evil);
    opposites.put(evil, good);
  }

  public Baz getOpposite() {
    return opposites.get(this);
  }
}
2

You can also use abstract methods to delay, which has benefits of type safety over the accepted answer.

public enum Baz {

    yin(new OppositeHolder() {
        @Override
        protected Baz getOpposite() {
            return yang;
        }
    }),
    yang(new OppositeHolder() {
        @Override
        protected Baz getOpposite() {
            return yin;
        }
    }),
    good(new OppositeHolder() {
        @Override
        protected Baz getOpposite() {
            return evil;
        }
    }),
    evil(new OppositeHolder() {
        @Override
        protected Baz getOpposite() {
            return good;
        }
    });

    private final OppositeHolder oppositeHolder;

    private Baz(OppositeHolder oppositeHolder) {
        this.oppositeHolder = oppositeHolder;
    }

    protected Baz getOpposite() {
        return oppositeHolder.getOpposite();
    }

    private abstract static class OppositeHolder {
        protected abstract Baz getOpposite();
    }

}

And test code, because I needed it....

import org.junit.Test;
import static org.junit.Assert.fail;

public class BazTest {

    @Test
    public void doTest() {
        for (Baz baz : Baz.values()) {
            System.out.println("Baz " + baz + " has opposite: " + baz.getOpposite());
            if (baz.getOpposite() == null) {
                fail("Opposite is null");
            }
        }
    }
}
  • This answer is incorrect: The obfuscation with the anonymous class does not delay reading the static field, specifically, Baz.yin.oppositeHolder.opposite is null. All this does is confuse the compiler enough that it no longer warns about you reading a static final field before it is assigned. – meriton May 6 '15 at 20:12
  • Quite true, I meant to edit this but forgot about it. Updated now with a working version. – Pool May 7 '15 at 21:19
  • ... and how would you ensure that setOpposite is invoked before somebody reads the opposite? – meriton May 7 '15 at 21:54
  • Updated. There are many ways to achieve this effect. It is frowned on to call an instance method within a constructor, but I've left this way for brevity. – Pool May 9 '15 at 9:50
  • ... and got it wrong: The static field is read before it is assigned, in particular, Baz.yin.getOpposite() returns null ... – meriton May 9 '15 at 13:14
0

And yet another possible implementation (similar to some of the other solutions, but with a HashMap).

import java.util.Map;
import java.util.HashMap;

public enum Baz {
 yin,
 yang,
 good,
 evil;

 private static Map<Baz, Baz> opposites = new HashMap<Baz, Baz>();
 static {
    opposites.put(yin, yang);
    opposites.put(yang, yin);
    opposites.put(good, evil);
    opposites.put(evil, good);
 }


 public Baz getOpposite() {
  return  opposites.get(this);
 }

}
  • Did you just copy&paste OldCurmudgeon's answer? 0.o – Zaq Sep 25 '12 at 23:45
  • Well, he used a HashMap instead of EnumMap, that counts! :D But yeah, the map pattern is pretty straightforward. – Natix Sep 26 '12 at 0:07
  • No he didn't. We posted at the same time. Note that I use an EnumMap instead of a HashMap. Spooky though eh? – OldCurmudgeon Sep 26 '12 at 0:07
  • Even spookier, my wife calls me an Old Curmudgeon all the time... – GreyBeardedGeek Sep 26 '12 at 0:28
0

One more alternative :) using a map. It's quite verbose, but this way you can define each pair only once, the other direction is inferred.

enum Baz {

    YIN, YANG, GOOD, EVIL;

    private static final Map<Baz, Baz> opposites = new EnumMap<>(Baz.class);

    static {
        opposites.put(YIN, YANG);
        opposites.put(GOOD, EVIL);

        for (Entry<Baz, Baz> entry : opposites.entrySet()) {
            opposites.put(entry.getValue(), entry.getKey());
        }
    }

    public Baz opposite() {
        return opposites.get(this);
    }
}

Personally, I like meriton's second example the best.

0

And then there is the totally OTT solution.

public enum Baz {
  yin,
  yang,
  good,
  evil,
  right,
  wrong,
  black,
  white;

  private static class AutoReversingMap<K extends Enum<K>> extends EnumMap<K, K> {
    public AutoReversingMap(Class<K> keys) {
      super(keys);
    }

    // Make put do both the forward and the reverse.
    public K put(K key, K value) {
      super.put(key, value);
      super.put(value, key);
      // Better to return null here than a misleading real return of one of the supers.
      return null;
    }
  }
  private static final Map<Baz, Baz> opposites = new AutoReversingMap<Baz>(Baz.class);

  static {
    // Assume even and odd ones are opposites.
    for (int i = 0; i < Baz.values().length; i += 2) {
      opposites.put(Baz.values()[i], Baz.values()[i + 1]);
    }
  }

  public Baz getOpposite() {
    return opposites.get(this);
  }
}
  • Yeah, over-the-top may be right... This is a great and thorough answer, but I think simpler answer may be better in this case. (also, I may add a value that is its own opposite, in which case, this isn't ideal) – Zaq Sep 25 '12 at 23:57
  • I totally agree. This was more for a bit of fun. I think @meriton's second suggestion is the neatest. – OldCurmudgeon Sep 26 '12 at 0:01
0

Years later, the shortest and most hacky solution

public enum Baz {
    YIN, // Use uppercase for enum names!
    YANG,
    GOOD,
    EVIL;

    public Baz opposite() {
        return values()[ordinal() ^ 1];
    }
}

It relies on the assumption that each member has an opposite and that they're arranged pairwise. It replaces the field by a method in the hope, that the JVM will optimize the whole overhead away. This is reasonable on desktop, less reasonable on Android.

To eliminate the overhead, I could use the static initializer as many other solutions here.

  • It isn't years later, only a few months. This is a good answer and I like its simplicity. I prefer lowercase on Java enum instances because they are practically the same as static final properties. Would the JVM really optimize out opposite? I'm not sure how much the JVM optimizes out. – Zaq May 21 '14 at 21:14
  • @user1494396 Simple short method call get always inlined whenever the JVM thinks it's performance-relevant. The call to values() normally includes cloning, but this is the easiest case for escape analysis. So I'd hope that nothing but field load, xor and static field load remain. This is still 3x as much work as with a field, but I guess that finding a real world example, where it can be measured is hard. – maaartinus May 21 '14 at 22:19
  • @user1494396 What else should be written in uppercase if not enums? The coding conventions says that constants should be, but it doesn't explain what a constant is. Maybe a compile-time constant, maybe a final (static?) variable pointing to an immutable object? – maaartinus May 21 '14 at 22:28
  • Honestly, static variables and enum values should be always in uppercase. – alexander Jan 30 '18 at 17:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.