206

Does AngularJS help in any way with setting an active class on the link for the current page?

I imagine there is some magical way this is done, but I can't seem to find.

My menu looks like:

 <ul>
   <li><a class="active" href="/tasks">Tasks</a>
   <li><a href="/actions">Tasks</a>
 </ul>

and I have controllers for each of them in my routes: TasksController and ActionsController.

But I can't figure out a way to bind the "active" class on the a links to the controllers.

Any hints?

0

29 Answers 29

266

on view

<a ng-class="getClass('/tasks')" href="/tasks">Tasks</a>

on controller

$scope.getClass = function (path) {
  return ($location.path().substr(0, path.length) === path) ? 'active' : '';
}

With this the tasks link will have the active class in any url that starts with '/tasks'(e.g. '/tasks/1/reports')

10
  • 4
    This would end up matching both "/" and "/anything" or if you have multiple menu items with similar urls, like "/test", "/test/this", "/test/this/path" if you were on /test, it would highlight all of those options. – Ben Lesh May 29 '13 at 2:34
  • 3
    I've changed this to if ($location.path() == path) and ,y path is "/blah" etc – Tim Jun 29 '13 at 6:55
  • 114
    I prefer the notation ngClass="{active: isActive('/tasks')}, where isActive() would return a boolean as it decouples the controller and the markup/styling. – Ed_ Oct 28 '13 at 12:58
  • 6
    Just in case anyone was wondering about the code to not double up if the path is "/", this is it (sorry for the formatting): $scope.getClass = function (path) { if ($location.path().substr(0, path.length) == path) { if (path == "/" && $location.path() == "/") { return "active"; } else if (path == "/") { return ""; } return "active" } else { return "" } } – user924069 Nov 15 '13 at 8:08
  • 1
    EdHinchliffe already pointed out that this mixes markup and logic. It also leads to duplicating of the path and could therefor be prone to copy & paste errors. I've found that the directive approach by @kfis, although more lines, is more reusable and keeps the markup cleaner. – A. Murray Dec 18 '13 at 12:15
86

I suggest using a directive on a link.

But its not perfect yet. Watch out for the hashbangs ;)

Here is the javascript for directive:

angular.module('link', []).
  directive('activeLink', ['$location', function (location) {
    return {
      restrict: 'A',
      link: function(scope, element, attrs, controller) {
        var clazz = attrs.activeLink;
        var path = attrs.href;
        path = path.substring(1); //hack because path does not return including hashbang
        scope.location = location;
        scope.$watch('location.path()', function (newPath) {
          if (path === newPath) {
            element.addClass(clazz);
          } else {
            element.removeClass(clazz);
          }
        });
      }
    };
  }]);

and here is how it would be used in html:

<div ng-app="link">
  <a href="#/one" active-link="active">One</a>
  <a href="#/two" active-link="active">One</a>
  <a href="#" active-link="active">home</a>
</div>

afterwards styling with css:

.active { color: red; }
6
  • I am not sure what you mean by "watch out for hashbangs". It seems like it would always work. Could you provide a counter-example? – Andriy Drozdyuk Mar 19 '13 at 4:36
  • 7
    If you are trying to use Bootstrap and need to set based on the hash of an a's href within a li, then use var path = $(element).children("a")[0].hash.substring(1);. This will work for a style like <li active-link="active"><a href="#/dashboard">Dashboard</a></li> – Dave Sep 2 '13 at 0:33
  • 2
    I would change scope.$watch('location.path()', function(newPath) { for scope.$on('$locationChangeStart', function(){. – sanfilippopablo Dec 31 '13 at 19:13
  • 2
    If you're using ng-href just change: var path = attrs.href; to var path = attrs.href||attrs.ngHref; – William Neely May 30 '14 at 11:19
  • If you use Bootstrap and need to put the active class on the <li>, you can change element.addClass(clazz); to element.parent().addClass(clazz); – JamesRLamar Jun 10 '14 at 23:25
48

Here's a simple approach that works well with Angular.

<ul>
    <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('/View1') }"><a href="#/View1">View 1</a></li>
    <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('/View2') }"><a href="#/View2">View 2</a></li>
    <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('/View3') }"><a href="#/View3">View 3</a></li>
</ul>

Within your AngularJS controller:

$scope.isActive = function (viewLocation) {
     var active = (viewLocation === $location.path());
     return active;
};

This thread has a number of other similar answers.

How to set bootstrap navbar active class with Angular JS?

1
  • 1
    Remove the variable as it is unnecessary. Just return the comparison result. return viewLocation === $location.path() – afarazit Jan 25 '17 at 0:16
33

Just to add my two cents in the debate I have made a pure angular module (no jQuery), and it will also work with hash urls containing data. (e.g. #/this/is/path?this=is&some=data)

You just add the module as a dependency and auto-active to one of the ancestors of the menu. Like this:

<ul auto-active>
    <li><a href="#/">main</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/first">first</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/second">second</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/third">third</a></li>
</ul>

And the module look like this:

(function () {
    angular.module('autoActive', [])
        .directive('autoActive', ['$location', function ($location) {
        return {
            restrict: 'A',
            scope: false,
            link: function (scope, element) {
                function setActive() {
                    var path = $location.path();
                    if (path) {
                        angular.forEach(element.find('li'), function (li) {
                            var anchor = li.querySelector('a');
                            if (anchor.href.match('#' + path + '(?=\\?|$)')) {
                                angular.element(li).addClass('active');
                            } else {
                                angular.element(li).removeClass('active');
                            }
                        });
                    }
                }

                setActive();

                scope.$on('$locationChangeSuccess', setActive);
            }
        }
    }]);
}());

(You can of course just use the directive part)

It's also worth noticing that this doesn't work for empty hashes (e.g. example.com/# or just example.com) it needs to have at least example.com/#/ or just example.com#/. But this happens automatically with ngResource and the like.

And here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/gy2an/8/

5
  • 1
    Great solution, however it didn't work on initial page load, just on locationChange while the app is live. I updated your snippet to handle that. – Jerry Apr 4 '14 at 5:21
  • @Jarek: Thanks! Have implemented your changes. I haven't had problems with this personally, but your solution seems like a good stable solution for those who should run into this problem. – Pylinux Apr 9 '14 at 8:28
  • 2
    I have now created a Github repo for pull requests if anybody else have any good ideas: github.com/Karl-Gustav/autoActive – Pylinux Apr 9 '14 at 12:21
  • I just fixed a few more bugs that would occur if you were using ng-href.. This is found here: github.com/Karl-Gustav/autoActive/pull/3 – Blake Niemyjski Nov 20 '14 at 22:21
  • It would be nice if this script allowed you to specify a path so you could have it activate other elements. – Blake Niemyjski Nov 20 '14 at 22:22
22

In my case I resolved this problem by creating a simple controller responsible for the navigation

angular.module('DemoApp')
  .controller('NavigationCtrl', ['$scope', '$location', function ($scope, $location) {
    $scope.isCurrentPath = function (path) {
      return $location.path() == path;
    };
  }]);

And by just adding ng-class to the element like so:

<ul class="nav" ng-controller="NavigationCtrl">
  <li ng-class="{ active: isCurrentPath('/') }"><a href="#/">Home</a></li>
  <li ng-class="{ active: isCurrentPath('/about') }"><a href="#/about">About</a></li>
  <li ng-class="{ active: isCurrentPath('/contact') }"><a href="#/contact">Contact</a></li>
</ul>
0
14

For AngularUI Router users:

<a ui-sref-active="active" ui-sref="app">

And that will place an active class on the object that is selected.

2
  • 2
    This is a ui-router directive and it doesn't work if you use the built-in router, aka ngRoute. That said, ui-router is awesome. – moljac024 Jun 18 '14 at 16:26
  • Agree, I forgot to mention originally that it was a ui-router only solution. – frankie4fingers Oct 5 '15 at 14:06
13

There is a ng-class directive, which binds variable and css class. It also accepts the object (className vs bool value pairs).

Here is the example, http://plnkr.co/edit/SWZAqj

6
  • Thanks, but this won't work with paths like: /test1/blahblah, or will it? – Andriy Drozdyuk Sep 26 '12 at 15:12
  • So are you saying that active: activePath=='/test1' automatically returns a "active" is path starts with the given string? Is this some kind of predefined operator or regex? – Andriy Drozdyuk Sep 26 '12 at 22:13
  • Sorry, I do not think I understood your requirement correctly. Here is my new guess, you want both highlight 'test1' link AND 'test1/blahblah' link highlighted when route is 'test1/blahblah'." Am I correct? If this is the requirement, you are right that my solution does not work. – Tosh Sep 26 '12 at 22:44
  • 3
    Here is the updated plnkr: plnkr.co/edit/JI5DtK (which satisfy the guessed requirement) to just show an alternative solution. – Tosh Sep 26 '12 at 22:58
  • I see what you did there. But I am not a fan of repeated == checks in the html. – Andriy Drozdyuk Mar 19 '13 at 4:29
13

The answer from @Renan-tomal-fernandes is good, but needed a couple of improvements to work correctly. As it was, it'd always detect the link to the home page ( / ) as triggered, even if you were in another section.

So I improved it a little bit, here's the code. I work with Bootstrap so the active part is in the <li> element instead of the the <a>.

Controller

$scope.getClass = function(path) {
    var cur_path = $location.path().substr(0, path.length);
    if (cur_path == path) {
        if($location.path().substr(0).length > 1 && path.length == 1 )
            return "";
        else
            return "active";
    } else {
        return "";
    }
}

Template

<div class="nav-collapse collapse">
  <ul class="nav">
    <li ng-class="getClass('/')"><a href="#/">Home</a></li>
    <li ng-class="getClass('/contents/')"><a href="#/contests/">Contents</a></li>
    <li ng-class="getClass('/data/')"><a href="#/data/">Your data</a></li>
  </ul>
</div>
0
10

Here is the solution that I came up with after reading some of the excellent suggestions above. In my particular situation, I was trying to use Bootstrap tabs component as my menu, but didn't want to use the Angular-UI version of this because I want the tabs to act as a menu, where each tab is bookmark-able, rather than the tabs acting as navigation for a single page. (See http://angular-ui.github.io/bootstrap/#/tabs if you're interested in what the Angular-UI version of bootstrap tabs looks like).

I really liked kfis's answer about creating your own directive to handle this, however it seemed cumbersome to have a directive that needed to be placed on every single link. So I've created my own Angular directive which is placed instead once on the ul. Just in case any one else is trying to do the same thing, I thought I'd post it here, though as I said, many of the above solutions work as well. This is a slightly more complex solution as far as the javascript goes, but it creates a reusable component with minimal markup.

Here is the javascript for the directive and the route provider for ng:view:

var app = angular.module('plunker', ['ui.bootstrap']).
  config(['$routeProvider', function($routeProvider) {
    $routeProvider.
        when('/One', {templateUrl: 'one.html'}).
        when('/Two', {templateUrl: 'two.html'}).
        when('/Three', {templateUrl: 'three.html'}).
        otherwise({redirectTo: '/One'});
  }]).
  directive('navTabs', ['$location', function(location) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element) {
            var $ul = $(element);
            $ul.addClass("nav nav-tabs");

            var $tabs = $ul.children();
            var tabMap = {};
            $tabs.each(function() {
              var $li = $(this);
              //Substring 1 to remove the # at the beginning (because location.path() below does not return the #)
              tabMap[$li.find('a').attr('href').substring(1)] = $li;
            });

            scope.location = location;
            scope.$watch('location.path()', function(newPath) {
                $tabs.removeClass("active");
                tabMap[newPath].addClass("active");
            });
        }

    };

 }]);

Then in your html you simply:

<ul nav-tabs>
  <li><a href="#/One">One</a></li>
  <li><a href="#/Two">Two</a></li>
  <li><a href="#/Three">Three</a></li>
</ul>
<ng:view><!-- Content will appear here --></ng:view>

Here's the plunker for it: http://plnkr.co/edit/xwGtGqrT7kWoCKnGDHYN?p=preview.

0
9

You can implement this very simply, here is an example:

<div ng-controller="MenuCtrl">
  <ul class="menu">
    <li ng-class="menuClass('home')"><a href="#home">Page1</a></li>
    <li ng-class="menuClass('about')"><a href="#about">Page2</a></li>
  </ul>

</div>

And your Controller should be this:

app.controller("MenuCtrl", function($scope, $location) {
  $scope.menuClass = function(page) {
    var current = $location.path().substring(1);
    return page === current ? "active" : "";
  };
});
5

use angular-ui-router's ui-sref-active directive https://github.com/angular-ui/ui-router/wiki/Quick-Reference#statename

<ul>
  <li ui-sref-active="active" class="item">
    <a href ui-sref="app.user({user: 'bilbobaggins'})">@bilbobaggins</a>
  </li>
  <!-- ... -->
</ul>

5

Using Angular Version 6 with Bootstrap 4.1

I was able to get it done like as seen below.

In the example below, when the URL sees '/contact', the bootstrap active is then added to the html tag. When the URL changes it is then removed.

<ul>
<li class="nav-item" routerLink="/contact" routerLinkActive="active">
    <a class="nav-link" href="/contact">Contact</a>
</li>
</ul>

This directive lets you add a CSS class to an element when the link's route becomes active.

Read more on Angular website

1
  • This is the answer in 2020. (active is the css-class) – Mar Tin Nov 8 '20 at 6:32
4

I had similar problem with menu located outside the controller scope. Not sure if this is best solution or a recommended one but this is what worked for me. I've added the following to my app configuration:

var app = angular.module('myApp');

app.run(function($rootScope, $location){
  $rootScope.menuActive = function(url, exactMatch){
    if (exactMatch){
      return $location.path() == url;
    }
    else {
      return $location.path().indexOf(url) == 0;
    }
  }
});

Then in the view I have:

<li><a href="/" ng-class="{true: 'active'}[menuActive('/', true)]">Home</a></li>
<li><a href="/register" ng-class="{true: 'active'}[menuActive('/register')]">
<li>...</li>
2
  • Um... this seems more complicated that the accepted answer. Could you describe the advantage of this over that one? – Andriy Drozdyuk Mar 19 '13 at 4:25
  • 1
    You will need it in the scenario when your menu is outside ng-view. View controller wont have access to anything that is outside so I've used $rootScope to enable communication. If your menu is inside the ng-view then there is no benefit to you from using this solution. – mrt Mar 19 '13 at 18:33
3

Using a directive (since we are doing DOM manipulation here) the following is probably the closest to doing things the "angular way":

$scope.timeFilters = [
  {'value':3600,'label':'1 hour'},
  {'value':10800,'label':'3 hours'},
  {'value':21600,'label':'6 hours'},
  {'value':43200,'label':'12 hours'},
  {'value':86400,'label':'24 hours'},
  {'value':604800,'label':'1 week'}
]

angular.module('whatever', []).directive('filter',function(){
return{
    restrict: 'A',
    template: '<li ng-repeat="time in timeFilters" class="filterItem"><a ng-click="changeTimeFilter(time)">{{time.label}}</a></li>',
    link: function linkFn(scope, lElement, attrs){

        var menuContext = attrs.filter;

        scope.changeTimeFilter = function(newTime){
          scope.selectedtimefilter = newTime;

        }

        lElement.bind('click', function(cevent){
            var currentSelection = angular.element(cevent.srcElement).parent();
            var previousSelection = scope[menuContext];

            if(previousSelection !== currentSelection){
                if(previousSelection){
                    angular.element(previousSelection).removeClass('active')
                }
                scope[menuContext] = currentSelection;

                scope.$apply(function(){
                    currentSelection.addClass('active');
                })
            }
        })
    }
}
})

Then your HTML would look like:

<ul class="dropdown-menu" filter="times"></ul>
3
  • Interesting. But menu-item seems redundant on each line. Perhaps attaching an attribute to ul element (e.g. <ul menu>) would be better, but I'm not sure if that would be possible. – Andriy Drozdyuk Apr 24 '13 at 2:35
  • Just updated with a newer version - instead of a static unordered list, I'm now using the Boostrap dropdown-menu as a select list. – Wesley Hales Apr 24 '13 at 15:15
  • This does seem the most like idiomatic angular. It seems to fit with the advice given at stackoverflow.com/questions/14994391/… , and it avoids duplicating the path in the view, in the href and in the ng-class. – fundead Jul 26 '13 at 10:56
2

I did it like this:

var myApp = angular.module('myApp', ['ngRoute']);

myApp.directive('trackActive', function($location) {
    function link(scope, element, attrs){
        scope.$watch(function() {
            return $location.path();
        }, function(){
            var links = element.find('a');
            links.removeClass('active');
            angular.forEach(links, function(value){
                var a = angular.element(value);
                if (a.attr('href') == '#' + $location.path() ){
                    a.addClass('active');
                }
            });
        });
    }
    return {link: link};
});

This enables you to have links in a section that has track-active directive:

<nav track-active>
     <a href="#/">Page 1</a>
     <a href="#/page2">Page 2</a>
     <a href="#/page3">Page 3</a>
</nav>

This approach seems much cleaner than others, to me.

Also, if you are using jQuery, you can make it a lot neater because jQlite only has basic selector support. A much cleaner version with jquery included before angular include would look like this:

myApp.directive('trackActive', function($location) {
    function link(scope, element, attrs){
        scope.$watch(function() {
            return $location.path();
        }, function(){
            element.find('a').removeClass('active').find('[href="#'+$location.path()+'"]').addClass('active');
        });
    }
    return {link: link};
});

Here is a jsFiddle

2

My solution to this problem, use route.current in the angular template.

As you have the /tasks route to highlight in your menu, you can add your own property menuItem to the routes declared by your module:

$routeProvider.
  when('/tasks', {
    menuItem: 'TASKS',
    templateUrl: 'my-templates/tasks.html',
    controller: 'TasksController'
  );

Then in your template tasks.htmlyou can use following ng-class directive:

<a href="app.html#/tasks" 
    ng-class="{active : route.current.menuItem === 'TASKS'}">Tasks</a>

In my opinion, this is much cleaner than all proposed solutions.

1

Here is an extension on kfis directive that I did to allow for different levels of path matching. Essentially I found the need for matching URL paths upto a certain depth, as exact matching doesn't allow for nesting and default state redirections. Hope this helps.

    .directive('selectedLink', ['$location', function(location) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        scope:{
            selectedLink : '='
            },
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, controller) {
            var level = scope.selectedLink;
            var path = attrs.href;
            path = path.substring(1); //hack because path does not return including hashbang
            scope.location = location;
            scope.$watch('location.path()', function(newPath) {
                var i=0;
                p = path.split('/');
                n = newPath.split('/');
                for( i ; i < p.length; i++) { 
                    if( p[i] == 'undefined' || n[i] == 'undefined' || (p[i] != n[i]) ) break;
                    }

                if ( (i-1) >= level) {
                    element.addClass("selected");
                    } 
                else {
                    element.removeClass("selected");
                    }
                });
            }

        };
    }]);

And here is how I use the link

<nav>
    <a href="#/info/project/list"  selected-link="2">Project</a>
    <a href="#/info/company/list" selected-link="2">Company</a>
    <a href="#/info/person/list"  selected-link="2">Person</a>
</nav>

This directive will match the depth level specified in the attribute value for the directive. Just means it can be used elsewhere many times over.

1

Here is yet another directive to highlight active links.

Key features:

  • Works fine with href that contains dynamic angular expressions
  • Compatible with hash-bang navigation
  • Compatible with Bootstrap where active class should be applied to parent li not the link itself
  • Allows make link active if any nested path is active
  • Allows make link disabled if it is not active

Code:

.directive('activeLink', ['$location', 
function($location) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
            var path = attrs.activeLink ? 'activeLink' : 'href';
            var target = angular.isDefined(attrs.activeLinkParent) ? elem.parent() : elem;
            var disabled = angular.isDefined(attrs.activeLinkDisabled) ? true : false;
            var nested = angular.isDefined(attrs.activeLinkNested) ? true : false;

            function inPath(needle, haystack) {
                var current = (haystack == needle);
                if (nested) {
                    current |= (haystack.indexOf(needle + '/') == 0);
                }

                return current;
            }

            function toggleClass(linkPath, locationPath) {
                // remove hash prefix and trailing slashes
                linkPath = linkPath ? linkPath.replace(/^#!/, '').replace(/\/+$/, '') : '';
                locationPath = locationPath.replace(/\/+$/, '');

                if (linkPath && inPath(linkPath, locationPath)) {
                    target.addClass('active');
                    if (disabled) {
                        target.removeClass('disabled');
                    }
                } else {
                    target.removeClass('active');
                    if (disabled) {
                        target.addClass('disabled');
                    }
                }
            }

            // watch if attribute value changes / evaluated
            attrs.$observe(path, function(linkPath) {
                toggleClass(linkPath, $location.path());
            });

            // watch if location changes
            scope.$watch(
                function() {
                    return $location.path(); 
                }, 
                function(newPath) {
                    toggleClass(attrs[path], newPath);
                }
            );
        }
    };
}
]);

Usage:

Simple example with angular expression, lets say $scope.var = 2, then link will be active if location is /url/2 :

<a href="#!/url/{{var}}" active-link>

Bootstrap example, parent li will get active class:

<li>
    <a href="#!/url" active-link active-link-parent>
</li>

Example with nested urls, link will be active if any nested url is active (i.e. /url/1, /url/2, url/1/2/...)

<a href="#!/url" active-link active-link-nested>

Complex example, link points to one url (/url1) but will be active if another is selected (/url2):

<a href="#!/url1" active-link="#!/url2" active-link-nested>

Example with disabled link, if it is not active it will have 'disabled' class:

<a href="#!/url" active-link active-link-disabled>

All active-link-* attributes can be used in any combination, so very complex conditions could be implemented.

1

If you want the links for the directive in a wrapper rather than selecting each individual link (makes it easier to look at the scope in Batarang), this works pretty well too:

  angular.module("app").directive("navigation", [
    "$location", function($location) {
      return {
        restrict: 'A',
        scope: {},
        link: function(scope, element) {
          var classSelected, navLinks;

          scope.location = $location;

          classSelected = 'selected';

          navLinks = element.find('a');

          scope.$watch('location.path()', function(newPath) {
            var el;
            el = navLinks.filter('[href="' + newPath + '"]');

            navLinks.not(el).closest('li').removeClass(classSelected);
            return el.closest('li').addClass(classSelected);
          });
        }
      };
    }
  ]);

Markup would just be:

    <nav role="navigation" data-navigation>
        <ul>
            <li><a href="/messages">Messages</a></li>
            <li><a href="/help">Help</a></li>
            <li><a href="/details">Details</a></li>
        </ul>
    </nav>

I should also mention that I am using 'full-fat' jQuery in this example, but you can easily alter what I have done with the filtering and so on.

0
1

Here's my two cents, this works just fine.

NOTE: This does not match childpages (which is what I needed).

View:

<a ng-class="{active: isCurrentLocation('/my-path')}"  href="/my-path" >
  Some link
</a>

Controller:

// make sure you inject $location as a dependency

$scope.isCurrentLocation = function(path){
    return path === $location.path()
}
1

According to @kfis 's answer, it's comments, and my recommend, the final directive as below:

.directive('activeLink', ['$location', function (location) {
    return {
      restrict: 'A',
      link: function(scope, element, attrs, controller) {
        var clazz = attrs.activeLink;        
        var path = attrs.href||attrs.ngHref;
        path = path.substring(1); //hack because path does not return including hashbang
        scope.location = location;
        scope.$watch('window.location.href', function () {
          var newPath = (window.location.pathname + window.location.search).substr(1);
          if (path === newPath) {
            element.addClass(clazz);
          } else {
            element.removeClass(clazz);
          }
        });
      }
    };
  }]);

and here is how it would be used in html:

<div ng-app="link">
  <a href="#/one" active-link="active">One</a>
  <a href="#/two" active-link="active">One</a>
  <a href="#" active-link="active">home</a>
</div>

afterwards styling with css:

.active { color: red; }
1

For those using ui-router, my answer is somewhat similar to Ender2050's, but I prefer doing this via state name testing:

$scope.isActive = function (stateName) {
  var active = (stateName === $state.current.name);
  return active;
};

corresponding HTML:

<ul class="nav nav-sidebar">
    <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('app.home') }"><a ui-sref="app.home">Dashboard</a></li>
    <li ng-class="{ active: isActive('app.tiles') }"><a ui-sref="app.tiles">Tiles</a></li>
</ul>
1

None of the above directive suggestions were useful to me. If you have a bootstrap navbar like this

<ul class="nav navbar-nav">
    <li><a ng-href="#/">Home</a></li>
    <li><a ng-href="#/about">About</a></li>
  ...
</ul>

(that could be a $ yo angular startup) then you want to add .active to the parent <li> element class list, not the element itself; i.e <li class="active">..</li>. So I wrote this :

.directive('setParentActive', ['$location', function($location) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function(scope, element, attrs, controller) {
      var classActive = attrs.setParentActive || 'active',
          path = attrs.ngHref.replace('#', '');
      scope.location = $location;
      scope.$watch('location.path()', function(newPath) {
        if (path == newPath) {
          element.parent().addClass(classActive);
        } else {
          element.parent().removeClass(classActive);
        }
      })
    }
  }
}])

usage set-parent-active; .active is default so not needed to be set

<li><a ng-href="#/about" set-parent-active>About</a></li>

and the parent <li> element will be .active when the link is active. To use an alternative .active class like .highlight, simply

<li><a ng-href="#/about" set-parent-active="highlight">About</a></li>
1
  • I had tried scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccess", function (event, current, previous) { applyActiveClass(); }); but it only works when the link is clicked and not 'on page load' (clicking on the refresh button). watching the location has worked for me – sawe Aug 5 '16 at 5:32
0

Most important for me was not to change at all the bootstrap default code. Here it is my menu controller that search for menu options and then add the behavior we want.

file: header.js
function HeaderCtrl ($scope, $http, $location) {
  $scope.menuLinkList = [];
  defineFunctions($scope);
  addOnClickEventsToMenuOptions($scope, $location);
}

function defineFunctions ($scope) {
  $scope.menuOptionOnClickFunction = function () {
    for ( var index in $scope.menuLinkList) {
      var link = $scope.menuLinkList[index];
      if (this.hash === link.hash) {
        link.parentElement.className = 'active';
      } else {
        link.parentElement.className = '';
      }
    }
  };
}

function addOnClickEventsToMenuOptions ($scope, $location) {
  var liList = angular.element.find('li');
  for ( var index in liList) {
    var liElement = liList[index];
    var link = liElement.firstChild;
    link.onclick = $scope.menuOptionOnClickFunction;
    $scope.menuLinkList.push(link);
    var path = link.hash.replace("#", "");
    if ($location.path() === path) {
      link.parentElement.className = 'active';
    }
  }
}

     <script src="resources/js/app/header.js"></script>
 <div class="navbar navbar-fixed-top" ng:controller="HeaderCtrl">
    <div class="navbar-inner">
      <div class="container-fluid">
        <button type="button" class="btn btn-navbar" data-toggle="collapse" data-target=".nav-collapse">
          <span class="icon-bar"></span> <span class="icon-bar"></span> 
<span     class="icon-bar"></span>
        </button>
        <a class="brand" href="#"> <img src="resources/img/fom-logo.png"
          style="width: 80px; height: auto;">
        </a>
        <div class="nav-collapse collapse">
          <ul class="nav">
            <li><a href="#/platforms">PLATFORMS</a></li>
            <li><a href="#/functionaltests">FUNCTIONAL TESTS</a></li>
          </ul> 
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
0

had same problem. Here is my solution:

.directive('whenActive',
  [
    '$location',
    ($location)->
      scope: true,
      link: (scope, element, attr)->
        scope.$on '$routeChangeSuccess', 
          () ->
            loc = "#"+$location.path()
            href = element.attr('href')
            state = href.indexOf(loc)
            substate = -1

            if href.length > 3
              substate = loc.indexOf(href)
            if loc.length is 2
              state = -1

            #console.log "Is Loc: "+loc+" in Href: "+href+" = "+state+" and Substate = "+substate

            if state isnt -1 or substate isnt -1
              element.addClass 'selected'
              element.parent().addClass 'current-menu-item'
            else if href is '#' and loc is '#/'
              element.addClass 'selected'
              element.parent().addClass 'current-menu-item'
            else
              element.removeClass 'selected'
              element.parent().removeClass 'current-menu-item'
  ])
0
0

I just wrote a directive for this.

Usage:

<ul class="nav navbar-nav">
  <li active><a href="#/link1">Link 1</a></li>
  <li active><a href="#/link2">Link 2</a></li>
</ul>

Implementation:

angular.module('appName')
  .directive('active', function ($location, $timeout) {
    return {
      restrict: 'A',
      link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
        // Whenever the user navigates to a different page...
        scope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function () {
          // Defer for other directives to load first; this is important
          // so that in case other directives are used that this directive
          // depends on, such as ng-href, the href is evaluated before
          // it's checked here.
          $timeout(function () {
            // Find link inside li element
            var $link = element.children('a').first();

            // Get current location
            var currentPath = $location.path();

            // Get location the link is pointing to
            var linkPath = $link.attr('href').split('#').pop();

            // If they are the same, it means the user is currently
            // on the same page the link would point to, so it should
            // be marked as such
            if (currentPath === linkPath) {
              $(element).addClass('active');
            } else {
              // If they're not the same, a li element that is currently
              // marked as active needs to be "un-marked"
              element.removeClass('active');
            }
          });
        });
      }
    };
  });

Tests:

'use strict';

describe('Directive: active', function () {

  // load the directive's module
  beforeEach(module('appName'));

  var element,
      scope,
      location,
      compile,
      rootScope,
      timeout;

  beforeEach(inject(function ($rootScope, $location, $compile, $timeout) {
    scope = $rootScope.$new();
    location = $location;
    compile = $compile;
    rootScope = $rootScope;
    timeout = $timeout;
  }));

  describe('with an active link', function () {
    beforeEach(function () {
      // Trigger location change
      location.path('/foo');
    });

    describe('href', function () {
      beforeEach(function () {
        // Create and compile element with directive; note that the link
        // is the same as the current location after the location change.
        element = angular.element('<li active><a href="#/foo">Foo</a></li>');
        element = compile(element)(scope);

        // Broadcast location change; the directive waits for this signal
        rootScope.$broadcast('$routeChangeSuccess');

        // Flush timeout so we don't have to write asynchronous tests.
        // The directive defers any action using a timeout so that other
        // directives it might depend on, such as ng-href, are evaluated
        // beforehand.
        timeout.flush();
      });

      it('adds the class "active" to the li', function () {
        expect(element.hasClass('active')).toBeTruthy();
      });
    });

    describe('ng-href', function () {
      beforeEach(function () {
        // Create and compile element with directive; note that the link
        // is the same as the current location after the location change;
        // however this time with an ng-href instead of an href.
        element = angular.element('<li active><a ng-href="#/foo">Foo</a></li>');
        element = compile(element)(scope);

        // Broadcast location change; the directive waits for this signal
        rootScope.$broadcast('$routeChangeSuccess');

        // Flush timeout so we don't have to write asynchronous tests.
        // The directive defers any action using a timeout so that other
        // directives it might depend on, such as ng-href, are evaluated
        // beforehand.
        timeout.flush();
      });

      it('also works with ng-href', function () {
        expect(element.hasClass('active')).toBeTruthy();
      });
    });
  });

  describe('with an inactive link', function () {
    beforeEach(function () {
      // Trigger location change
      location.path('/bar');

      // Create and compile element with directive; note that the link
      // is the NOT same as the current location after the location change.
      element = angular.element('<li active><a href="#/foo">Foo</a></li>');
      element = compile(element)(scope);

      // Broadcast location change; the directive waits for this signal
      rootScope.$broadcast('$routeChangeSuccess');

      // Flush timeout so we don't have to write asynchronous tests.
      // The directive defers any action using a timeout so that other
      // directives it might depend on, such as ng-href, are evaluated
      // beforehand.
      timeout.flush();
    });

    it('does not add the class "active" to the li', function () {
      expect(element.hasClass('active')).not.toBeTruthy();
    });
  });

  describe('with a formerly active link', function () {
    beforeEach(function () {
      // Trigger location change
      location.path('/bar');

      // Create and compile element with directive; note that the link
      // is the same as the current location after the location change.
      // Also not that the li element already has the class "active".
      // This is to make sure that a link that is active right now will
      // not be active anymore when the user navigates somewhere else.
      element = angular.element('<li class="active" active><a href="#/foo">Foo</a></li>');
      element = compile(element)(scope);

      // Broadcast location change; the directive waits for this signal
      rootScope.$broadcast('$routeChangeSuccess');

      // Flush timeout so we don't have to write asynchronous tests.
      // The directive defers any action using a timeout so that other
      // directives it might depend on, such as ng-href, are evaluated
      // beforehand.
      timeout.flush();
    });

    it('removes the "active" class from the li', function () {
      expect(element.hasClass('active')).not.toBeTruthy();
    });
  });
});
0

The route:

$routeProvider.when('/Account/', { templateUrl: '/Home/Account', controller: 'HomeController' });

The menu html:

<li id="liInicio" ng-class="{'active':url=='account'}">

The controller:

angular.module('Home').controller('HomeController', function ($scope, $http, $location) {
    $scope.url = $location.url().replace(/\//g, "").toLowerCase();
...

The problem I found here is that the menu item is active only when the full page is loaded. When the partial view is loaded the menu doesn't change. Somebody knows why it happens?

0
$scope.getClass = function (path) {
return String(($location.absUrl().split('?')[0]).indexOf(path)) > -1 ? 'active' : ''
}


<li class="listing-head" ng-class="getClass('/v/bookings')"><a href="/v/bookings">MY BOOKING</a></li>
<li class="listing-head" ng-class="getClass('/v/fleets')"><a href="/v/fleets">MY FLEET</a></li>
<li class="listing-head" ng-class="getClass('/v/adddriver')"><a href="/v/adddriver">ADD DRIVER</a></li>
<li class="listing-head" ng-class="getClass('/v/bookings')"><a href="/v/invoice">INVOICE</a></li>
<li class="listing-head" ng-class="getClass('/v/profile')"><a href="/v/profile">MY PROFILE</a></li>
<li class="listing-head"><a href="/v/logout">LOG OUT</a></li>
0

I found the easiest solution. just to compare indexOf in HTML

var myApp = angular.module('myApp', []);

myApp.run(function($rootScope) {
    $rootScope.$on("$locationChangeStart", function(event, next, current) { 
         $rootScope.isCurrentPath = $location.path();  
    });
});



<li class="{{isCurrentPath.indexOf('help')>-1 ? 'active' : '' }}">
<a href="/#/help/">
          Help
        </a>
</li>

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