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I want to find doubled-word(s) in a text, i used (\w+) +\1 it works, but however it only finds "abc abc" in the text.

i also want to find "abc def abc def"

thanks,..

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  • Which regexp are you using? What language?
    – gnarf
    Aug 11, 2009 at 10:41
  • Can you actually do this in regular languages? Seems like this is as impossible as matching parentheses, another well-known impossibility in conventional regexpen
    – MSalters
    Aug 11, 2009 at 10:54
  • It's quite possible with backreferences (notably not a feature of formal regex, but a feature of most modern regex engines).
    – Amber
    Aug 11, 2009 at 10:57
  • @gnarf: i used it on PHP @MSalters: as @Dav said, its possible with back references i used "\1" btw, the solution is "(\w.*) +\1"
    – WhoSayIn
    Aug 11, 2009 at 12:35

4 Answers 4

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The following regex will match any repeated sequence of characters:

/(.+).*?\1/

If you only want repeated sequences that have nothing but whitespace in between, then use this instead:

/(.+)\s+?\1/

If you only want words separated by whitespace, change the (.+) to a (\w+):

/(\w+)\s+?\1/

If you want to look at words ignoring things like punctuation, word borders might be more useful:

/(\b\w+?\b)\.+?\b\1\b/
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  • .+?, so we don't match ie. "wikiwiki" Aug 11, 2009 at 10:45
  • I think he wanted words, this will even match two white spaces in the same set of characters.
    – Salgar
    Aug 11, 2009 at 10:45
  • Depends on which behavior the question-asker desires, but I'll add it as an option.
    – Amber
    Aug 11, 2009 at 10:45
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Not sure what you want it to match but it could be as simple as changing it to:

(\w+) +.*\1

the .* will match any extra characters which might be in between.

This will match the 'abc def abc' part of 'abc def abc def', If you want to match it all change it to:

(\w+) +.*\1.*

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  • thanks for your answer but it didnt work. now, i tried "((\w| )+) +\1" it works!! but it also finds " " (spaces more than 3)
    – WhoSayIn
    Aug 11, 2009 at 10:45
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"(\w.*) +\1" maybe? or does this get too general for your needs?

"(\w+(?:\s+\w+)*) +\1" might work as well.

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are you trying to delete the duplicates? or you can also check this answer

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