634

I want a two-column div layout, where each one can have variable width e.g.

div {
  float: left;
}

.second {
  background: #ccc;
}
<div>Tree</div>
<div class="second">View</div>

I want the 'view' div to expand to the whole width available after 'tree' div has filled needed space.

Currently, my 'view' div is resized to content it contains It will also be good if both divs take up the whole height.


Not duplicate disclaimer:

2
  • 1
    related stackoverflow.com/a/22719552/759452
    – Adrien Be
    Jan 27, 2015 at 9:45
  • 1
    Either I don't understand the question or I don't understand how you choose the accepted answer, because there both widths and heights are fixed with the inconvenience of overflow hidden Nov 21, 2017 at 23:45

21 Answers 21

1070

The solution to this is actually very easy, but not at all obvious. You have to trigger something called a "block formatting context" (BFC), which interacts with floats in a specific way.

Just take that second div, remove the float, and give it overflow:hidden instead. Any overflow value other than visible makes the block it's set on become a BFC. BFCs don't allow descendant floats to escape them, nor do they allow sibling/ancestor floats to intrude into them. The net effect here is that the floated div will do its thing, then the second div will be an ordinary block, taking up all available width except that occupied by the float.

This should work across all current browsers, though you may have to trigger hasLayout in IE6 and 7. I can't recall.

Demos:

div {
  float: left;
}

.second {
  background: #ccc;
  float: none;
  overflow: hidden;
}
<div>Tree</div>
<div class="second">View</div>

24
  • 28
    Excellent answer! But you're wrong when you say "any overflow value other than auto" will make it a BFC. What you mean is any overflow value other than the default (visible) will make it a BFC. In fact, overflow auto works perfectly too - thats what I'd recommend (just in case you do have relatively positioned elements that might peek out of that div).
    – B T
    May 28, 2011 at 18:33
  • 55
    This article has a nice explanation: colinaarts.com/articles/the-magic-of-overflow-hidden
    – Max Cantor
    Oct 20, 2011 at 18:53
  • 2
    What if the content is big enough to overflow the div ? Jan 29, 2012 at 17:05
  • 13
    It is important to note, that the order of the children matters. The floating element with fixed width has to be above the other one. Took me too long to figure out, why it didn't worked for me with switched order.
    – Riplexus
    Oct 12, 2015 at 11:46
  • 2
    I wrote an answer explaining why a non-visible overflow of all things triggers a BFC, based on responses given by David and Boris, which can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9943503/… Was my interpretation correct?
    – BoltClock
    Nov 18, 2015 at 16:29
166

I just discovered the magic of flex boxes (display: flex). Try this:

<style>
  #box {
    display: flex;
  }
  #b {
    flex-grow: 100;
    border: 1px solid green;
  }
</style>
<div id='box'>
 <div id='a'>Tree</div>
 <div id='b'>View</div>
</div>

Flex boxes give me the control I've wished css had for 15 years. Its finally here! More info: https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox/

4
  • I don't know what you discovered, but your code is not working in latest Chrome jsfiddle.net/fjb548kw/3 Aug 11, 2018 at 3:23
  • @YevgeniyAfanasyev I removed the "float:left;" to fix the issue. Thanks for the note!
    – B T
    Aug 13, 2018 at 22:44
  • Thank you. Can you please explain why do you have flex-grow: 100; instead of flex-grow: 1;? Aug 14, 2018 at 5:01
  • 7
    @YevgeniyAfanasyev No particular reason except that's how I like to do it. It allows me to think in percents so if I could do something like set #a to flex-grow:10 and then I'd set #b to flex-grow: 90 so #a would be 10% of the line's width and #b would be 90% of the line's width. If no other elements have a flex width style, then it doesn't technically matter what you put.
    – B T
    Aug 14, 2018 at 23:41
58

Use the CSS Flexbox flex-grow property to fill the remaining space.

html, body {
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  display: flex;
}
.second {
  flex-grow: 1;
}
<div style="background: #bef;">Tree</div>
<div class="second" style="background: #ff9;">View</div>

0
28

This would be a good example of something that's trivial to do with tables and hard (if not impossible, at least in a cross-browser sense) to do with CSS.

If both the columns were fixed width, this would be easy.

If one of the columns was fixed width, this would be slightly harder but entirely doable.

With both columns variable width, IMHO you need to just use a two-column table.

3
  • 11
    Table won't be very good in a responsive design where you want the right hand column to slide under the left on small devices though.
    – S..
    Mar 21, 2014 at 22:35
  • 1
    There are some responsive design tricks to work with tables: css-tricks.com/responsive-data-tables
    – Rikki
    May 2, 2015 at 14:32
  • I tend now to often design two separate layouts completely and change on a mobile using media queries and display:none; Whilst making as much as possible 100% responsive on a sliding scale sometimes it's nicer to change your design completely for a mobile making use of the touch screen feel and button style.
    – Bysander
    Sep 2, 2015 at 13:20
24

Use calc:

.leftSide {
  float: left;
  width: 50px;
  background-color: green;
}
.rightSide {
  float: left;
  width: calc(100% - 50px);
  background-color: red;
}
<div style="width:200px">
  <div class="leftSide">a</div>
  <div class="rightSide">b</div>
</div>

The problem with this is that all widths must be explicitly defined, either as a value(px and em work fine), or as a percent of something explicitly defined itself.

2
  • The benefit of this is that it works with input type fields, which the top rated comment wont. Feb 11, 2021 at 10:06
  • best answer. works for all cases Nov 13, 2021 at 0:09
22

Check this solution out

.container {
  width: 100%;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: green;
}
.sidebar {
  float: left;
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: yellow;
}
.content {
  background-color: red;
  height: 200px;
  width: auto;
  margin-left: 200px;
}
.item {
  width: 25%;
  background-color: blue;
  float: left;
  color: white;
}
.clearfix {
  clear: both;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="clearfix"></div>
  <div class="sidebar">width: 200px</div>

  <div class="content">
    <div class="item">25%</div>
    <div class="item">25%</div>
    <div class="item">25%</div>
    <div class="item">25%</div>
  </div>
</div>

2
  • 2
    This is generally a superior solution because hiding overflow is not always desired. Dec 17, 2014 at 23:04
  • 3
    Per OP: "I want a two-column div layout, where each one can have variable width". In your answer, you have to know the width of the first column, so it's not variable. You might as well set fixed widths on both columns and just float them.
    – Jacob
    Nov 25, 2015 at 21:06
15

Here, this might help...

<html>

<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    div.box {
      background: #EEE;
      height: 100px;
      width: 500px;
    }
    div.left {
      background: #999;
      float: left;
      height: 100%;
      width: auto;
    }
    div.right {
      background: #666;
      height: 100%;
    }
    div.clear {
      clear: both;
      height: 1px;
      overflow: hidden;
      font-size: 0pt;
      margin-top: -1px;
    }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <div class="box">
    <div class="left">Tree</div>
    <div class="right">View</div>
    <div class="clear" />
  </div>
</body>

</html>

3
  • +1 because your example seems to work, but in my real scenario some how contents from 'view' creep into 'tree' div, as tree div is not 100%, may be some javascript forces it to be small and after height of tree I see view contents Aug 12, 2009 at 6:21
  • In that case, if u know the max-width of the left column, u can either give it a style max-width (does not work in IE) or think of margin-left (beware of double-margin bug on IE) or padding-left.
    – a6hi5h3k
    Aug 15, 2009 at 1:13
  • This was great! I'm using it in-line as a one-off solution: <div class="clear" style="clear: both; height: 1px; overflow: hidden; font-size:0pt; margin-top: -1px;"></div>
    – ajwest
    Mar 10, 2015 at 23:55
9

If the width of the other column is fixed, how about using the calc CSS function working for all common browsers:

width: calc(100% - 20px) /* 20px being the first column's width */

This way the width of the second row will be calculated (i.e. remaining width) and applied responsively.

1
  • This is the best answer as far as using anything else than flexbox, like for example, css-grid. Also works with position: fixed which makes it all around perfect choice! Thank you!
    – Bartekus
    Jan 10, 2020 at 22:46
5

I don't understand why people are willing to work so hard to find a pure-CSS solution for simple columnar layouts that are SO EASY using the old TABLE tag.

All Browsers still have the table layout logic... Call me a dinosaur perhaps, but I say let it help you.

<table WIDTH=100% border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
  <tr>
    <td WIDTH="1" NOWRAP bgcolor="#E0E0E0">Tree</td>
    <td bgcolor="#F0F0F0">View</td>
  </tr>
</table>

Much less risky in terms of cross-browser compatibility too.

2
  • 2
    yes, but if everything is being done by css why not this, at least a curiosity if it is possble? Dec 9, 2010 at 14:46
  • 3
    That is because if you want to put media-queries to put both columns one above the other in small devices, it is impossible with the old table tag. To get this working, you need to apply CSS table styles. So, for nowadays it is better to solve this with CSS if you want a responsive layout for any screen size.
    – ElChiniNet
    Jun 2, 2017 at 10:42
3

<html>

<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    div.box {
      background: #EEE;
      height: 100px;
      width: 500px;
    }
    div.left {
      background: #999;
      float: left;
      height: 100%;
      width: auto;
    }
    div.right {
      background: #666;
      height: 100%;
    }
    div.clear {
      clear: both;
      height: 1px;
      overflow: hidden;
      font-size: 0pt;
      margin-top: -1px;
    }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <div class="box">
    <div class="left">Tree</div>
    <div class="right">View</div>
    <div class="right">View</div>
    <div style="width: <=100% getTreeWidth()100 %>">Tree</div>
    <div class="clear" />
  </div>
  <div class="ColumnWrapper">
    <div class="Colum­nOne­Half">Tree</div>
    <div class="Colum­nOne­Half">View</div>
  </div>

</body>

</html>

1
  • I want something like a status bar with fixed items on the left, fixed items on the right and one message line that uses all of the left over space. I started with this answer and added my message div AFTER the floats with: height: 20px; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; text-overflow:clip
    – englebart
    Aug 14, 2017 at 20:15
3

You can try CSS Grid Layout.

dl {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: max-content auto;
}

dt {
  grid-column: 1;
}

dd {
  grid-column: 2;
  margin: 0;
  background-color: #ccc;
}
<dl>
  <dt>lorem ipsum</dt>
  <dd>dolor sit amet</dd>
  <dt>carpe</dt>
  <dd>diem</dd>
</dl>

3

flex-grow - This defines the ability for a flex item to grow if necessary. It accepts a unitless value that serves as a proportion. It dictates what amount of the available space inside the flex container the item should take up.

If all items have flex-grow set to 1, the remaining space in the container will be distributed equally to all children. If one of the children has a value of 2, the remaining space would take up twice as much space as the others (or it will try to, at least). See more here

.parent {
  display: flex;
}

.child {
  flex-grow: 1; // It accepts a unitless value that serves as a proportion
}

.left {
  background: red;
}

.right {
  background: green;
}
<div class="parent"> 
  <div class="child left">
      Left 50%
  </div>
   <div class="child right">
      Right 50%
  </div>
</div>

1
  • In your exemple both divs will grow and fill the remaining space. The question asked that one div doesn't grow, and the other fills the remaining space.
    – KVM
    Apr 20, 2021 at 12:07
1

Im not sure if this is the answer you are expecting but, why don't you set the width of Tree to 'auto' and width of 'View' to 100% ?

1
  • 3
    Because that will put the second float below the first because it's too wide.
    – cletus
    Aug 11, 2009 at 12:50
1

A slightly different implementation,

Two div panels(content+extra), side by side, content panel expands if extra panel is not present.

jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/qLTMf/1722/

1

Pat - You are right. That's why this solution would satisfy both "dinosaurs" and contemporaries. :)

.btnCont {
  display: table-layout;
  width: 500px;
}

.txtCont {
  display: table-cell;
  width: 70%;
  max-width: 80%;
  min-width: 20%;
}

.subCont {
  display: table-cell;
  width: 30%;
  max-width: 80%;
  min-width: 20%;
}
<div class="btnCont">
  <div class="txtCont">
    Long text that will auto adjust as it grows. The best part is that the width of the container would not go beyond 500px!
  </div>
  <div class="subCont">
    This column as well as the entire container works like a table. Isn't Amazing!!!
  </div>
</div>

1
  • 2
    There is no html reference for the css class .ip and it doesn't work in IE7
    – Keith K
    Jun 2, 2011 at 7:45
1

You can use W3's CSS library that contains a class called rest that does just that:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://www.w3schools.com/w3css/4/w3.css">

<div class="w3-row">
  <div class="w3-col " style="width:150px">
    <p>150px</p>
  </div>
  <div class="w3-rest w3-green">
    <p>w3-rest</p>
  </div>
</div>

Don't forget to link the CSS library in the page's header:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://www.w3schools.com/w3css/4/w3.css">

Here's the official demo: W3 School Tryit Editor

1
  • Looks like that just adds "overflow: hidden", which makes it a worse version of the answer already given Mar 24, 2020 at 19:13
1

This is fairly easy using flexbox. See the snippet below. I've added a wrapper container to control flow and set a global height. Borders have been added as well to identify the elements. Notice that divs now expand to the full height as well, as required. Vendor prefixes should be used for flexbox in a real world scenario since is not yet fully supported.

I've developed a free tool to understand and design layouts using flexbox. Check it out here: http://algid.com/Flex-Designer

.container{
    height:180px;
    border:3px solid #00f;
    display:flex;
    align-items:stretch;
}
div {
    display:flex;
    border:3px solid #0f0;
}
.second {
    display:flex;
    flex-grow:1;
    border:3px solid #f00;
}
<div class="container">
    <div>Tree</div>
    <div class="second">View</div>
</div>

7
  • did you read ALL the previous answers before adding yours? it seems no ... Aug 12, 2018 at 8:10
  • as a side note, you don't need to add stretch because it's the default value and no need to make the child element flex container so display:flex is useless for the inner elements Aug 12, 2018 at 8:11
  • I wonder why the downvote, without any comment. Isn't this answer replying to the question? Why? If trying to help others is penalized I will think twice before my next answer, Aug 12, 2018 at 8:13
  • 1
    you got two comments after the downvote, it's not enough? Aug 12, 2018 at 8:13
  • Temari, Did you check out my tool? Don't you think is useful and could help others? Do you think is not related with the question? Where is your answer to this question? I can't see it. What's your role here? Aug 12, 2018 at 8:16
0

Have a look at the available CSS layout frameworks. I would recommend Simpl or, the slightly more complex, Blueprint framework.

If you are using Simpl (which involves importing just one simpl.css file), you can do this:

<div class="Colum­nOne­Half">Tree</div>
<div class="Colum­nOne­Half">View</div>

, for a 50-50 layout, or :

<div class="Colum­nOne­Quarter">Tree</div>
<div class="Colum­nThreeQuarters">View</div>

, for a 25-75 one.

It's that simple.

1
  • will both columns be variable width? Aug 12, 2009 at 6:00
0

Thanks for the plug of Simpl.css!

remember to wrap all your columns in ColumnWrapper like so.

<div class="ColumnWrapper">
    <div class="Colum­nOne­Half">Tree</div>
    <div class="Colum­nOne­Half">View</div>
</div>

I am about to release version 1.0 of Simpl.css so help spread the word!

0

I wrote a javascript function that I call from jQuery $(document).ready(). This will parse all children of the parent div and only update the right most child.

html

...
<div class="stretch">
<div style="padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px; display: inline-block;">Some text
</div>
<div class="underline" style="display: inline-block;">Some other text
</div>
</div>
....

javascript

$(document).ready(function(){
    stretchDivs();
});

function stretchDivs() {
    // loop thru each <div> that has class='stretch'
    $("div.stretch").each(function(){
        // get the inner width of this <div> that has class='stretch'
        var totalW = parseInt($(this).css("width"));
        // loop thru each child node
        $(this).children().each(function(){
            // subtract the margins, borders and padding
            totalW -= (parseInt($(this).css("margin-left")) 
                     + parseInt($(this).css("border-left-width")) 
                     + parseInt($(this).css("padding-left"))
                     + parseInt($(this).css("margin-right")) 
                     + parseInt($(this).css("border-right-width")) 
                     + parseInt($(this).css("padding-right")));
            // if this is the last child, we can set its width
            if ($(this).is(":last-child")) {
                $(this).css("width","" + (totalW - 1 /* fudge factor */) + "px");
            } else {
                // this is not the last child, so subtract its width too
                totalW -= parseInt($(this).css("width"));
            }
        });
    });
}
0
-6

If both of the widths are variable length why don't you calculate the width with some scripting or server side?

<div style="width: <=% getTreeWidth() %>">Tree</div>

<div style="width: <=% getViewWidth() %>">View</div>
4
  • 4
    How does the server know how the client's layout engine will work?
    – Kev
    Aug 11, 2009 at 13:07
  • Simple: develop it for 90% of the browsers out there :) IE 7+ , FF3+ and Safari support CSS 3. You could also include the standard IE6 <!--[if lte IE 6]> element. By the way, what browser doesn't support style="width: %" ??
    – amischiefr
    Aug 11, 2009 at 13:25
  • I don't know how It can be done server side, but yes some javscript may do it but i want to avoid it unless css/html can't do it Aug 12, 2009 at 5:59
  • Which it can't. Therefore, if you want both to be dynamic then you have to do it in either script or server side.
    – amischiefr
    Aug 12, 2009 at 12:21

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