1

I understand that in C++ you can overload an operator like a function. And as common with functions in C++, you have to specify a return value:

struct A {

    int operator +();

};

Here I've overloaded operator+ as a function that returns an int. But I find that when I overload a type while giving it a return value, I get error: return type specified for 'operator int'.

struct A {

    void operator int() {} // error

};

But if I take away the return value it works fine.

struct A {

    operator int() {} // pass

};

Does the error mean that by my use of int before the function parameters, that I'm creating a function that returns an int. Or is this some mistake? What if I want the function to not return a value? Can someone please explain why I'm getting this error? Thanks.

  • "What if I want the function to not return at all?" What would such a function even mean? – GManNickG Sep 27 '12 at 16:37
  • @GManNickG Suppose the function calls _exit() or abort() or throws an exception... – Seg Fault Sep 27 '12 at 16:40
  • @SegFault: To clarify, I read that as: "What if I want the [operator int] function to not return [a value] at all?" That is a conversion function that returns no value after conversion. (Though there is operator void, it cannot be called.) – GManNickG Sep 27 '12 at 16:46
  • @GManNickG Ok, now I understand your initial comment ;-) – Seg Fault Sep 27 '12 at 16:55
  • @GManNickG I meant what if I don't want the function to return a value at all. My words weren't chosen wisely as I see now. :) – 0x499602D2 Sep 27 '12 at 19:07
8

By definition, operator int() returns an int. It will be called in contexts where an object of type A needs to be converted to int. That's quite different from the first code snippet, where the operator is operator+(); you can define it to return pretty much anything you like.

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  • 1
    Yes, the operator+ is a completely different case. – Seg Fault Sep 27 '12 at 16:34
7

Well, operator int is the operator that turns your A into an int, therefore it already has the return type defined, and by writing void operator int you are giving it another return type!

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5

operator int() is implicit conversion operator from your type to int. So it could not have any return type except int which is defined by operator name.

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1

you're confusing ordinary (unary and binary) operators with type-conversion operators

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