62

I would like to change the name of an item in an enum type in PostgreSQL 9.1.5.

Here is the type's create stmt:

CREATE TYPE import_action AS ENUM
('Ignored',
'Inserted',
'Updated',
'Task created');

I just want to change 'Task created' to 'Aborted'. It seems like from the documentation, that the following should work:

ALTER TYPE import_action
RENAME ATTRIBUTE "Task created" TO "Aborted"; 

However, I get a msg:

********** Error **********

ERROR: relation "import_action" does not exist
SQL state: 42P01

But, it clearly does exist.

The type is currently being used by more than one table.

I'm being to think that there must not be a way to do this. I've tried the dialog for the type in pgAdminIII, but there is no way that I can see to rename the it there. (So, either a strong hint that I can't do it, or - I'm hoping - a small oversight be the developer that created that dialog)

If I can't do this in one statment? Then what do I need to do? Will I have to write a script to add the item, update all of the records to new value, then drop the old item? Will that even work?

It's seems like this should be a simple thing. As I understand it, the records are just storing a reference to the type and item. I don't think they are actually store the text value that I have given it. But, maybe I'm wrong here as well.

4 Answers 4

119

In PostgreSQL version 10, the ability to rename the labels of an enum has been added as part of the ALTER TYPE syntax:

ALTER TYPE name RENAME VALUE 'existing_enum_value' TO 'new_enum_value'
1
  • 1
    Do not forget to quote values alter type order_status rename value 'new' to 'draft'
    – Nick Roz
    Feb 25, 2022 at 17:33
43

Update: For PostgreSQL version 10 or later, see the top-voted answer.

Names of enum values are called labels, attributes are something different entirely.

Unfortunately changing enum labels is not simple, you have to muck with the system catalog: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/catalog-pg-enum.html

UPDATE pg_enum SET enumlabel = 'Aborted' 
WHERE enumlabel = 'Task created' AND enumtypid = (
  SELECT oid FROM pg_type WHERE typname = 'import_action'
)
18
  • 1
    Thanks for the reply... I'm wondering how good (or bad) of an idea this is. It seems like if this were a safe operation, they would have a way to do this via a the ALTER TYPE stmt or via the pgAdminIII dialog. That said, it seems (to me) that you should be able to do this. I think it's just a label. Any other comments?
    – David S
    Sep 27, 2012 at 19:22
  • @DavidS I don't see it as unsafe. It is more a matter that PostgreSQL developers have not added such a feature. (The ability to add a value, like in Catcall's answer, was only just added in 9.1.) Sep 27, 2012 at 19:24
  • 1
    @Catcall The footgun comment refers to removing a value, but regardless, I don't think a 6-year old comment arguing against a feature, which has been partially implemented since that discussion, is relevant. Sep 28, 2012 at 22:11
  • 1
    @Catcall "Add, remove, or rename" includes add; and your answer below describes how to add an element to an enum type, so how can you say it hasn't been implemented? The reason Andrew called it a footgun is because, "we'd have to check every row to ensure we weren't orphaning some value", which is clearly referring to removing a value. Sep 29, 2012 at 1:12
  • 1
    @Catcall I know that. You wrote in your last comment that the designers were (six years ago) opposed to adding, removing, or renaming. Clearly, they are no longer opposed to adding, because they have indeed implemented it. Since they are no longer opposed to adding, there is no reason to believe they continue to be opposed to renaming, unless they have specifically said so recently. And, for the 3rd time, it is clear that the footgun remark is in regards to removing, because the explanation for the concern was "orphaned values." Sep 29, 2012 at 2:16
13

The query in the accepted answer doesn't take into account schema names. Here's a safer (and simpler) one, based on http://tech.valgog.com/2010/08/alter-enum-in-postgresql.html

UPDATE pg_catalog.pg_enum
SET enumlabel = 'NEW_LABEL'
WHERE enumtypid = 'SCHEMA_NAME.ENUM_NAME'::regtype::oid AND enumlabel = 'OLD_LABEL'
RETURNING enumlabel;

Note that this requires the "rolcatupdate" (Update catalog directly) permission - even being a superuser is not enough.

It seems that updating the catalog directly is still the only way as of PostgreSQL 9.3.

7

There's a difference between types, attributes, and values. You can create an enum like this.

CREATE TYPE import_action AS ENUM
('Ignored',
'Inserted',
'Updated',
'Task created');

Having done that, you can add values to the enum.

ALTER TYPE import_action 
ADD VALUE 'Aborted';

But the syntax diagram doesn't show any support for dropping or renaming a value. The syntax you were looking at was the syntax for renaming an attribute, not a value.

Although this design is perhaps surprising, it's also deliberate. From the pgsql-hackers mailing list.

If you need to modify the values used or want to know what the integer is, use a lookup table instead. Enums are the wrong abstraction for you.

3
  • 1
    Why was this answer downvoted? This is the only way enums are intended to work. Manual modification of system catalogs is not to my liking. And, to be clear, enums are quite unnecessary (the can be replaced by relational tools like tables and FKs on them).
    – dezso
    Sep 28, 2012 at 7:03
  • It doesn't answer the question. Oct 2, 2012 at 15:50
  • 3
    Actually the quote from the mailing list is a bit out of context. It refers to the user wanting to get access to an enum's integer representation. As for altering the label the mailing list entry says: "Support for ALTER TYPE to allow adding / modifying values etc. For the time being you'll just have to create a new type, do a bunch of ALTER TABLE commands, DROP the old type and rename the new one if you want the old name back."
    – Daniel
    Oct 15, 2015 at 14:26

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