17

I am trying to program the coin change problem in Scala using recursion. The code that i have written is as follows.

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
  def ways(change: List[Int], size: Int, capacity: Int): Int = {
    if(capacity == 0) 1
    if((capacity < 0) || (size <= 0)) 0

    //println and readLine to check and control each recursive call.

    println("calling ways(",change, change.length-1, capacity,") + ways(",change,   change.length, capacity - change(change.length - 1),")")
    readLine()
    //

    ways(change, change.length-1, capacity) + ways(change, change.length, capacity - change(change.length - 1))
  }
  ways(coins, coins.length, money)
}

On running the code, it does not terminate and keeps on calling the first recursive call. Where am I going wrong?

1
8

Simply stating a value does not make Scala return it; you either need an explicit return, or it has to be the last item stated. Thus:

if (capacity == 0) return 1

or

if (capacity == 0) 1
else if (...)
else { ... }
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2
  • are you sure it works? i'm still having the same problem as stated earlier – Muavia Sep 27 '12 at 21:22
  • 2
    @user1050258 - Well, that wasn't the only problem--you also use change.length-1 instead of size-1 in various places. You don't update change itself in your solution! (Hint: if you did update change, then you would have avoided this bug and wouldn't need the size argument....) – Rex Kerr Sep 27 '12 at 21:37
100

Nice and simple

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
  if(money == 0)
    1
  else if(money > 0 && !coins.isEmpty)
    countChange(money - coins.head, coins) + countChange(money, coins.tail)
  else
    0
}
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5
  • 4
    Could you provide some intuition behind this solution? – user2253546 Apr 4 '17 at 8:01
  • 12
    The idea here is to use up our coins and subtract it from the current amount of money. Eventually, the amount of money will be either 0, some negative number (meaning this combination of coins failed), or some positive number (meaning that we can still subtract more with the coins we currently have). countChange(money - coins.head, coins) will exhaust all combinations subtracting the first coin from the money, while countChange(money, coins.tail) exhausts all combinations using all other coins only. They are added together, since + is synonymous with the logical OR operator. – rkenmi May 6 '17 at 6:01
  • 4
    The solution is nice. One question about the base case: what if the initial money is 0. Isn't there 0 way to make changes for 0 money? – rileyss Sep 13 '17 at 7:49
  • 3
    Imagine that you are given some coins in front of you and you are asked to match that using a huge bag of coins. If you had a penny in front of you, there is only 1 way to match that; by using a penny from your bag. Next, what if you had no coins in front of you? Again there is only 1 way to represent that; by not taking out any coins in your bag. Now finally, what if you had negative money? Well, you can't really represent that physically. So there are 0 ways to produce this output; the bag of coins is completely irrelevant in this scenario. – rkenmi Nov 3 '17 at 3:55
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    @rileyss you can represent 0 money by showing 0 coins. Remember, the question is "how many ways can we represent money given a certain denomination of coins". So using zero of the coins is still considered one distinct way. – Janac Meena Mar 12 '19 at 16:14
20

Here is my implementation: I have tested it and it works fine

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {

    def count(capacity: Int, changes: List[Int]): Int = {
                if(capacity == 0) 
                  1
                else if(capacity < 0) 
                  0
                else if(changes.isEmpty && capacity>=1 )
                  0
                else
                        count(capacity, changes.tail) + count(capacity - changes.head, changes)
    }

    count(money, coins.sortWith(_.compareTo(_) < 0))
}
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4
  • 1
    Nice! Although, I think changing names (money -> capacity, coins -> changes) makes it harder to understand. – Filip Spiridonov Nov 8 '13 at 12:29
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    is the sorting really needed? – Verneri Åberg Mar 10 '14 at 21:53
  • I have a question am new to scala : how does the compiler reads this line : count(capacity, changes.tail) + count(capacity - changes.head, changes) ? I know how the recursion works but am having problem understanding how the compiler executes the last line – mkazma May 13 '14 at 10:01
  • 1
    @moe you may choose to watch week 1 lecture of this course by Martin Odersky class.coursera.org/progfun-004/lecture/4 – Anand Jun 30 '14 at 12:48
12

Just another solution

def countChange(amount: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = coins match {
  case _ if amount == 0 => 1
  case h :: t if amount > 0 => countChange(amount - h, h :: t) + countChange(amount, t)
  case _ => 0
}
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3

Hey I just thought it would be better to see not only the amount but also the list of them, so put on top of the above example like :

def moneyChanges(money: Int, coins: List[Int]) : Option[List[Seq[Int]]]= {
  var listOfChange=List[Seq[Int]]()
  def changeMoney(capacity: Int, changes: List[Int], listOfCoins: Option[Seq[Int]]): Int = {
    if (capacity == 0) {
      listOfChange = listOfCoins.get :: listOfChange
      1
    } else if (capacity < 0)
      0
    else if (changes.isEmpty && capacity >= 1)
      0
    else {
      changeMoney(capacity, changes.tail, listOfCoins) +
      changeMoney(capacity - changes.head, changes, 
      Some(changes.head +: listOfCoins.getOrElse(Seq())))
    }
  }

  changeMoney(money, coins.sortWith(_.compareTo(_) < 0), None)
  Some(listOfChange)
}
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0

here is a DP approach to reduce a lot of re-calculation in recursive approach

object DP {
  implicit val possibleCoins = List(1, 5, 10, 25, 100)
  import collection.mutable.Map

  def countChange(amount: Int)(implicit possibleCoins: List[Int]) = {
    val min = Map((1 to amount).map (_->Int.MaxValue): _*)
    min(0) = 0
    for {
      i <- 1 to amount
      coin <- possibleCoins
      if coin <= i && min(i - coin) + 1 < min(i)
    } min(i) = min(i-coin) + 1
    min(amount)
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) = println(countChange(97))
}

see DP from novice to advanced for algorithm

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0

Below code is similar to one of the above example except I am using match case instead of if else

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
    def change(m: Int, coinList: List[Int], count: Int): Int =
      m match {
        case _ if m < 0 => count
        case _ if coinList.isEmpty => {
          m match {
            case 0 => count + 1
            case _ => count
          }
        }
        case _ => change(m, coinList.tail, count) + change(m - coinList.head, coinList, count)
      }
    change(money, coins, 0)
  }
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0

Here is my code: It's not optimized but works on all test cases.

The idea is to subtract first coin of list from from money until it becomes 0. Once it becomes 0, it will return 1 which means one solution is possible. To add all solutions coming from different recursion I used foldLeft.

(iterating list using foldLeft, so first goes in 1, then again goes in recursion and iterate for (1, 2) list)

                [4, (1, 2)].  
         /(1 as cn)       \ (2 as cn)
        [3, (1, 2)].                 [2, (2)]
     /(-1)       \(-2)                \
  [2, (1, 2)].     [1, (2)].          [0, (2)]   
   /.(-1)    \(-2) 
 [1, (1, 2)].   [0, (2)]
  /. (-1)  \(-2)
[0, (1, 2)].  [-1, (2)]


def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = coins.foldLeft(0)((accum, cn) =>
  (money, cn) match  {
    case (money, _) if money < 0 => 0
    case (0, _) => 1
    case (curr_money, curr_coin) => {
      val (before_curr_coin, after_curr_coin) = coins.span(_ != curr_coin)
      accum + countChange(curr_money - curr_coin, after_curr_coin)
    }
})
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