10

I managed to obtain this kind of table layout:

fixed - dynamic(50%) - dynamic(50%) - fixed

http://jsfiddle.net/ihtus/ksucU/

enter image description here

But how do I get this kind? fixed - dynamic(30%) - dynamic(70%) - fixed

enter image description here

Here's my CSS:

table {
    width:100%;
    border-collapse:collapse;
    table-layout:fixed;
}

td {
    border: 1px solid #333;
}
18

Like this:

<table>
    <tr>
      <td style="width:200px;">
        200px width - content
      </td>
      <td width="30%">
        dynamic width - content
      </td>
      <td width="70%">
        dynamic width - content
      </td>
      <td style="width:100px;">
         100px width - content
      </td>
    </tr>
  </table>

table {
    width:100%;
    border-collapse:collapse;
    table-layout:fixed;
}

td {
    border: 1px solid #333;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/7dSpr/

  • but why if not using "table-layout:fixed;" => everything breaks? – ihtus Sep 28 '12 at 13:51
  • It is because table-layout by default is set to auto which means it will be as wide as the widest unbreakable content in the cells. fixed will take into consideration your width settings in the css. Note that not everything breaks, the percentage widths in the middle two columns will continue to be 30% and 70%. – Mr. Mr. Sep 28 '12 at 13:54
  • will continue to be 30% and 70% from what width? from total table width? not from "w" width? – ihtus Sep 28 '12 at 14:01
  • 30% and 70% of what ever is left after the two td elements on the left and right have expanded to fit the non-breakable content inside of them. In total the table will be 100% of the page including the default margins and padding. – Mr. Mr. Oct 1 '12 at 9:00
2

The general approach is the same as the one Monkieboy used, but you should avoid inline styles. ( by that I mean writing style="someting" ) in your html file. You should use classes and CSS instead.

First give the td a class like this <td class="thin-column">text here</td>, then in your CSS use that to apply styles: .thin-column:{ width: 30% }

  • 1
    +1 - that is correct, I just did not want to write too much to illustrate a point. – Mr. Mr. Sep 28 '12 at 13:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.