11

I'm trying to use the shapely.geometry.Polygon module to find the area of polygons but it performs all calculations on the xy plane. This is fine for some of my polygons but others have a z dimension too so it's not quite doing what I'd like.

Is there a package which will either give me the area of a planar polygon from xyz coordinates, or alternatively a package or algorithm to rotate the polygon to the xy plane so that i can use shapely.geometry.Polygon().area?

The polygons are represented as a list of tuples in the form [(x1,y1,z1),(x2,y2,z3),...(xn,yn,zn)].

  • 3
    a polygon is a strictly 2 dimensional figure. What exactly are you trying to calculate? – Bartlomiej Lewandowski Sep 28 '12 at 14:50
  • I'm trying to find the surface areas of roofs and walls of a building from 'xyz' coordinates of the vertices. – Jamie Bull Sep 28 '12 at 14:53
  • I haven't found any module to do that, but you could simply cast down each face, to an xy plane, and calculate that with the module you have been using – Bartlomiej Lewandowski Sep 28 '12 at 15:06
  • What do you mean by "cast down"? – Jamie Bull Sep 28 '12 at 15:13
  • Just rotate the shape until it's flat on the z plane. – Mark Ransom Sep 28 '12 at 15:47
13

Here is the derivation of a formula for calculating the area of a 3D planar polygon

Here is Python code that implements it:

#determinant of matrix a
def det(a):
    return a[0][0]*a[1][1]*a[2][2] + a[0][1]*a[1][2]*a[2][0] + a[0][2]*a[1][0]*a[2][1] - a[0][2]*a[1][1]*a[2][0] - a[0][1]*a[1][0]*a[2][2] - a[0][0]*a[1][2]*a[2][1]

#unit normal vector of plane defined by points a, b, and c
def unit_normal(a, b, c):
    x = det([[1,a[1],a[2]],
             [1,b[1],b[2]],
             [1,c[1],c[2]]])
    y = det([[a[0],1,a[2]],
             [b[0],1,b[2]],
             [c[0],1,c[2]]])
    z = det([[a[0],a[1],1],
             [b[0],b[1],1],
             [c[0],c[1],1]])
    magnitude = (x**2 + y**2 + z**2)**.5
    return (x/magnitude, y/magnitude, z/magnitude)

#dot product of vectors a and b
def dot(a, b):
    return a[0]*b[0] + a[1]*b[1] + a[2]*b[2]

#cross product of vectors a and b
def cross(a, b):
    x = a[1] * b[2] - a[2] * b[1]
    y = a[2] * b[0] - a[0] * b[2]
    z = a[0] * b[1] - a[1] * b[0]
    return (x, y, z)

#area of polygon poly
def area(poly):
    if len(poly) < 3: # not a plane - no area
        return 0

    total = [0, 0, 0]
    for i in range(len(poly)):
        vi1 = poly[i]
        if i is len(poly)-1:
            vi2 = poly[0]
        else:
            vi2 = poly[i+1]
        prod = cross(vi1, vi2)
        total[0] += prod[0]
        total[1] += prod[1]
        total[2] += prod[2]
    result = dot(total, unit_normal(poly[0], poly[1], poly[2]))
    return abs(result/2)

And to test it, here's a 10x5 square that leans over:

>>> poly = [[0, 0, 0], [10, 0, 0], [10, 3, 4], [0, 3, 4]]
>>> poly_translated = [[0+5, 0+5, 0+5], [10+5, 0+5, 0+5], [10+5, 3+5, 4+5], [0+5, 3+5, 4+5]]
>>> area(poly)
50.0
>>> area(poly_translated)
50.0
>>> area([[0,0,0],[1,1,1]])
0

The problem originally was that I had oversimplified. It needs to calculate the unit vector normal to the plane. The area is half of the dot product of that and the total of all the cross products, not half of the sum of all the magnitudes of the cross products.

This can be cleaned up a bit (matrix and vector classes would make it nicer, if you have them, or standard implementations of determinant/cross product/dot product), but it should be conceptually sound.

  • Thanks, Tom. I'd found that page and also some sample code for applying Stoke's theorem to a 2D polygon but was having trouble making it work for 3D. Your implementation looks good to me. I'm just adapting it to work with the way my data's structured which is [(x1,y1,z1),(x2,y2,z2),...]. – Jamie Bull Sep 28 '12 at 16:02
  • The area function should be the same. cross_product_magnitude would change to x = a[1] * b[2] - a[2] * b[1] etc. – Tom Smilack Sep 28 '12 at 16:06
  • Yes, I've got that - but it's throwing out results that are way too large. Do I need to move the shape so one vertex is at the origin? – Jamie Bull Sep 28 '12 at 16:15
  • You shouldn't have to. I think I messed up somewhere, I'll look into it. – Tom Smilack Sep 28 '12 at 16:31
  • 1
    Why is the unit normal computed via determinant? Can’t you just do a cross product of the polygon first two edges + normalization ? – DolphinDream Dec 5 '18 at 23:51
5

This is the final code I've used. It doesn't use shapely, but implements Stoke's theorem to calculate the area directly. It builds on @Tom Smilack's answer which shows how to do it without numpy.

import numpy as np

#unit normal vector of plane defined by points a, b, and c
def unit_normal(a, b, c):
    x = np.linalg.det([[1,a[1],a[2]],
         [1,b[1],b[2]],
         [1,c[1],c[2]]])
    y = np.linalg.det([[a[0],1,a[2]],
         [b[0],1,b[2]],
         [c[0],1,c[2]]])
    z = np.linalg.det([[a[0],a[1],1],
         [b[0],b[1],1],
         [c[0],c[1],1]])
    magnitude = (x**2 + y**2 + z**2)**.5
    return (x/magnitude, y/magnitude, z/magnitude)

#area of polygon poly
def poly_area(poly):
    if len(poly) < 3: # not a plane - no area
        return 0
    total = [0, 0, 0]
    N = len(poly)
    for i in range(N):
        vi1 = poly[i]
        vi2 = poly[(i+1) % N]
        prod = np.cross(vi1, vi2)
        total[0] += prod[0]
        total[1] += prod[1]
        total[2] += prod[2]
    result = np.dot(total, unit_normal(poly[0], poly[1], poly[2]))
    return abs(result/2)
1

Fyi, here is the same algorithm in Mathematica, with a baby unit test

ClearAll[vertexPairs, testPoly, area3D, planeUnitNormal, pairwise];
pairwise[list_, fn_] := MapThread[fn, {Drop[list, -1], Drop[list, 1]}];
vertexPairs[Polygon[{points___}]] := Append[{points}, First[{points}]];
testPoly = Polygon[{{20, -30, 0}, {40, -30, 0}, {40, -30, 20}, {20, -30, 20}}];
planeUnitNormal[Polygon[{points___}]] :=
  With[{ps = Take[{points}, 3]},
   With[{p0 = First[ps]},
    With[{qs = (# - p0) & /@ Rest[ps]},
     Normalize[Cross @@ qs]]]];
area3D[p : Polygon[{polys___}]] :=
  With[{n = planeUnitNormal[p], vs = vertexPairs[p]},
   With[{areas = (Dot[n, #]) & /@ pairwise[vs, Cross]},
    Plus @@ areas/2]];
area3D[testPoly]
  • The planeUnitNormal computation is not robust in case the first three points are colinear. A smarter algorithm would pick three points that are not colinear (testing by pairwise[...,Cross]=!=0 and throw if it can't find three. – Reb.Cabin Apr 8 '14 at 17:58
  • @reb-cabin why throw? If every triple of points is collinear, then the answer is zero. – Don Hatch Jan 25 at 7:03
0

The area of a 2D polygon can be calculated using Numpy as a one-liner...

poly_Area(vertices) = np.sum( [0.5, -0.5] * vertices * np.roll( np.roll(vertices, 1, axis=0), 1, axis=1) )
  • This doesn't work for a 2D polygon in 3D space, e.g. all coplanar but referred to in xyz coordinates. – Jamie Bull Jul 29 '13 at 15:31
0

Same as @Tom Smilack's answer, but in javascript

//determinant of matrix a
function det(a) {
  return a[0][0] * a[1][1] * a[2][2] + a[0][1] * a[1][2] * a[2][0] + a[0][2] * a[1][0] * a[2][1] - a[0][2] * a[1][1] * a[2][0] - a[0][1] * a[1][0] * a[2][2] - a[0][0] * a[1][2] * a[2][1];
}
//unit normal vector of plane defined by points a, b, and c
function unit_normal(a, b, c) {
  let x = math.det([
    [1, a[1], a[2]],
    [1, b[1], b[2]],
    [1, c[1], c[2]]
  ]);
  let y = math.det([
    [a[0], 1, a[2]],
    [b[0], 1, b[2]],
    [c[0], 1, c[2]]
  ]);
  let z = math.det([
    [a[0], a[1], 1],
    [b[0], b[1], 1],
    [c[0], c[1], 1]
  ]);
  let magnitude = Math.pow(Math.pow(x, 2) + Math.pow(y, 2) + Math.pow(z, 2), 0.5);
  return [x / magnitude, y / magnitude, z / magnitude];
}
// dot product of vectors a and b
function dot(a, b) {
  return a[0] * b[0] + a[1] * b[1] + a[2] * b[2];
}
// cross product of vectors a and b
function cross(a, b) {
  let x = (a[1] * b[2]) - (a[2] * b[1]);
  let y = (a[2] * b[0]) - (a[0] * b[2]);
  let z = (a[0] * b[1]) - (a[1] * b[0]);
  return [x, y, z];
}

// area of polygon poly
function area(poly) {
  if (poly.length < 3) {
    console.log("not a plane - no area");
    return 0;
  } else {
    let total = [0, 0, 0]
    for (let i = 0; i < poly.length; i++) {
      var vi1 = poly[i];
      if (i === poly.length - 1) {
        var vi2 = poly[0];
      } else {
        var vi2 = poly[i + 1];
      }
      let prod = cross(vi1, vi2);
      total[0] = total[0] + prod[0];
      total[1] = total[1] + prod[1];
      total[2] = total[2] + prod[2];
    }
    let result = dot(total, unit_normal(poly[0], poly[1], poly[2]));

    return Math.abs(result/2);
  }

}

  • "math.det" should just be "det" – pauloz1890 Mar 8 at 4:04

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