1

I have strange problem. I have three classes. Book ( abstract ), and two subclasses ( Fiction, Nonfiction). I have created array of Book references. That array can hold both subclasse's objects. I'have following code for Fiction class.

public class Fiction extends Book{

public Fiction(String title) {
    super(title);

    setPrice();
}

public void setPrice() {

    super.price = 24.99;

}

}

And the "same" code for Nonfiction class

public class Nonfiction extends Book{

public Nonfiction(String title) {
    super(title);

    setPrice();
}

public void setPrice() {

    super.price = 37.99;

}

}

And this is Main program.

import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Book[] book = new Fiction[6];

    for(int i = 0; i<book.length; i++) {

        if(i<4) {
            String title = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter fiction book, no "+i);
            book[i] = new Fiction(title);

        } else {

            String title = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter non fiction book, no "+i);
            book[i] = new Nonfiction(title);

        }

    }

    for(int x = 0; x<book.length; x++) {

        System.out.println("Book named "+book[x].getTitle()+" costs "+book[x].getPrice());

    }


}

}

For any reason i'm getting ArrayStoreException on this line..

book[i] = new Nonfiction(title);

But same code works for Fiction class. I checked java documentation and it says that this exception is thrown when i'm trying to store different objects in array ( like String and Int ), but in this case they are all the same objects. Both classes are children of superclass, that means, they are of the same type. I'm confsued. A little help here please?

  • Please note that even if a class if abstract (or an instance) you can still construct a new array instance of that type, e.g. new Serializable[]. – David Grant Sep 28 '12 at 15:39
0

Replace this: -

Book[] book = new Fiction[6];

With : -

Book[] book = new Book[6];

By using first way of declaration, you are actually telling compiler that Array will contain object of type Fiction and not any other subtype of Book

You have confused yourself between: -

Book book = new Fiction();

and

 Book[] books = new Fiction[6];
  • Oh god! You are right. I really confused myself with that. omg, thank you. I know i can't do that, but i confused myself. must pay more attention. thanks – Firefoxx Pwnass Sep 28 '12 at 15:47
4

You can't put a Nonfiction in a new Fiction[6].

You're being misled by the fact that you can assign an array of Fictions to a variable of type Book[] (array covariance).
As you've discovered, that should not be possible, since a Fiction[] cannot be treated as a Book[]. (mutable types cannot be covariant)

This is a design flaw in Java.

  • True. I confused myself. Thanks. – Firefoxx Pwnass Sep 28 '12 at 15:48

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