17

I am reading in a file and wonder if there's a way to read the next line in a for loop?

I am currently reading the file like this:

file = open(input,"r").read()
for line in file.splitlines():
  line = doSomething()

So is there anyway I can retrieve the next line of the file in that for loop such that I can perform some operation in the doSomething() function?

35

Just loop over the open file:

infile = open(input,"r")
for line in infile:
    line = doSomething(line, next(infile))

Because you now use the file as an iterator, you can call the next() function on the infile variable at any time to retrieve an extra line.

Two extra tips:

  1. Don't call your variable file; it masks the built-in file type object in python. I named it infile instead.

  2. You can use the open file as a context manager with the with statement. It'll close the file for you automatically when done:

    with open(input,"r") as infile:
        for line in infile:
            line = doSomething(line, next(infile))
    
8
  • this is better than my indexing solution as it actually increments the counter as well... – Joran Beasley Sep 28 '12 at 20:37
  • 1
    @Martijin: A small query: Using next() will move the pointer to the next line, but when the control comes back to the for loop, will it again read the "next" line or pass on to the next-to-next line? – Konstant Sep 28 '12 at 20:38
  • 1
    @MartijnPieters: Thanks a lot. So if i have to read every line in a file and process it depending on the next one, i cannot use it. Right? Just curious (and learning). – Konstant Sep 28 '12 at 20:43
  • 1
    @Konstant: You'd have to use some kind of push-back buffer, yes. Load the next line, push it back into the buffer when done. – Martijn Pieters Sep 28 '12 at 20:53
  • 1
    @user5359531: next() always gives you the next item from an iterator. You can insert an itertools.islice() object if you need to skip items and use the next item after that: next(islice(infile, 2, 3)) skips to, then produces the 3rd. – Martijn Pieters Aug 31 '16 at 14:43
8
file = open(input,"r").read()
lines =  file.read().splitlines()
for i in range(len(lines)):
     line = lines[i]
     next_line = lines[i+1]
3
  • 4
    why -1? ... this does what was asked ... Martjin's answer is better granted but this gives you next line (at least now it does .. was missing read() )... – Joran Beasley Sep 28 '12 at 20:38
  • how do you close the file in this case? – Flame of udun Oct 24 '18 at 17:19
  • file.close() ... or understand python garbage collection... or understand that opening a file for reading does not lock the file so it doesnt really matter in general ... you could just as easily use a with open(...) as f context if you are really worried about it – Joran Beasley Oct 24 '18 at 18:08
8

I think that you mean that if you are in line n, you want to be able to access line n+1.

The simplest way to do that is to replace

for line in file.splitlines():

with

lines = file.readlines()
for i in xrange(len(lines)):

then you can get the current line with lines[i] and the next line with lines[i+1]

the more pythonic way is to use enumerate

lines = file.readlines()
for index, line in enumerate(lines):

now you have the current line in "line" like normal, but you also have the index if you want to find a different line relative to it.

3
  • Martin posted his answer while I was fighting with the editor. His is a little more svelte, but it's still worthwhile to be aware of the enumerate option. – BostonJohn Sep 28 '12 at 20:41
  • Coming across this answer in 2016 it bears pointing out that 'xrange' does not exist in Python 3 and 'range' should be used instead. – Michael Jun 27 '16 at 13:26
  • Doesn't this approach read the entire file into memory, in contrast to the method that uses the file as an iterator (for line in infile:)? That may be a trivial difference to some, but could matter quite a lot if you are dealing with very large files. The iterator method is inherently more efficient. – Erik Swan Jun 17 '20 at 23:44

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