The singleton pattern ensures only one instance of a class is ever created. How do I build this in Dart?

up vote 88 down vote accepted

Thanks to Dart's factory constructors, it's easy to build a singleton:

class Singleton {
  static final Singleton _singleton = new Singleton._internal();

  factory Singleton() {
    return _singleton;
  }

  Singleton._internal();
}

You can construct it with new

main() {
  var s1 = new Singleton();
  var s2 = new Singleton();
  print(identical(s1, s2));  // true
  print(s1 == s2);           // true
}
  • 1
    Although what's the point of instantiating it twice? Shouldn't it be better if it threw an error when you instantiate it the second time? – westoque May 29 '13 at 6:30
  • 11
    I'm not instantiating it twice, just getting a reference to a Singleton object twice. You probably wouldn't do it twice in a row in real life :) I wouldn't want an exception thrown, I just want the same singleton instance every time I say "new Singleton()". I admit, it's a bit confusing... new doesn't mean "construct a new one" here, it just says "run the constructor". – Seth Ladd May 29 '13 at 22:11
  • 1
    What exactly does the factory keyword serve over here? It is purely annotating the implementation. Why is it required? – Καrτhικ Dec 3 '13 at 14:29
  • 3
    It's kind of confusing that you are using a constructor to get the instance. The new keyword suggests that the class is instantiated, which it isn't. I'd go for a static method get() or getInstance() like I do in Java. – Steven Roose Jan 24 '14 at 16:26
  • 4
    @SethLadd this is very nice but I suggest it needs a couple points of explanation. There's the weird syntax Singleton._internal(); that looks like a method call when it's really a constructor definition. There's the _internal name. And there's the nifty language design point that Dart lets you start out (dart out?) using an ordinary constructor and then, if needed, change it to a factory method without changing all the callers. – Jerry101 May 8 '14 at 22:36

I don't find it very intuitive reading new Singleton(). You have to read the docs to know that new isn't actually creating a new instance, as it normally would.

Here's another way to do singletons (Basically what Andrew said above).

lib/thing.dart

library thing;

final Thing thing = new Thing._private();

class Thing {
   Thing._private() { print('#2'); }
   foo() {
     print('#3');
   }
}

main.dart

import 'package:thing/thing.dart';

main() {
  print('#1');
  thing.foo();
}

Note that the singleton doesn't get created until the first time the getter is called due to Dart's lazy initialization.

If you prefer you can also implement singletons as static getter on the singleton class. i.e. Thing.singleton, instead of a top level getter.

Also read Bob Nystrom's take on singletons from his Game programming patterns book.

  • 1
    This makes more sense to me, thanks to Greg and the feature of top-level property of dart. – Eason PI Jul 8 '16 at 3:00
  • This is no idiomatic. It is a dream feature to have a singleton pattern build in the language, and you are throwing it out because you are not used to it. – Arash May 21 '17 at 13:39
  • Both Seth's example and this example are singleton patterns. It's really a question of syntax "new Singleton()" vs "singleton". I find the latter more clear. Dart's factory constructors are useful, but I don't think this is a good use case for them. I also think Dart's lazy initialisation is a great feature, which is underused. Also read Bob's article above - he recommends against singletons in most cases. – Greg Lowe May 21 '17 at 20:41
  • I also recommend reading this thread on the mailing list. groups.google.com/a/dartlang.org/d/msg/misc/9dFnchCT4kA/… – Greg Lowe May 21 '17 at 20:44

What about just using a global variable within your library, like so?

single.dart:

library singleton;

var Singleton = new Impl();

class Impl {
  int i;
}

main.dart:

import 'single.dart';

void main() {
  var a = Singleton;
  var b = Singleton;
  a.i = 2;
  print(b.i);
}

Or is this frowned upon?

The singleton pattern is necessary in Java where the concept of globals doesn't exist, but it seems like you shouldn't need to go the long way around in Dart.

  • 2
    Top-level variables are cool. However, anyone who can imported single.dart is free to construct a "new Impl()". You could give a underscore constructor to Impl, but then code inside the singleton library could call that constructor. – Seth Ladd Sep 29 '12 at 7:16
  • And the code in your implementation can't? Can you explain in your answer why it is better than a top level variable? – Jan Sep 29 '12 at 8:40
  • 2
    Hi @Jan, it's not better or worse, it's just different. In Andrew's example, Impl isn't a singleton class. He did correctly use a top-level variable to make the instance Singleton easy to access. In my example above, the Singleton class is a real singleton, only one instance of Singleton can ever exist in the isolate. – Seth Ladd Sep 29 '12 at 19:33
  • 1
    Seth, you are not right. There is no way in Dart to build a true singleton, as there is no way of restricting instantiability of a class inside the declaring library. It always requires discipline from the library author. In your example, the declaring library can call new Singleton._internal() as many times as it wants, creating a lot of objects of the Singleton class. If the Impl class in Andrew's example was private (_Impl), it would be the same as your example. On the other hand, singleton is an antipattern and noone should use it anyway. – Ladicek Sep 30 '12 at 16:44
  • @Ladicek, don't you trust the developers of a library not to call new Singelton._internal(). You can argue that the developers of the singelton class could instatiate the class several times as well. Sure there is the enum singelton but to me it is only of theoretic use. An enum is an enum, not a singelton... As for the use of top-level variables (@Andrew and @Seth): Couldn't anyone write to the top-level variable? It is by no means protected, or am I missing something? – Tobias Ritzau Oct 9 '12 at 19:18

Dart singleton by const constructor & factory

class Singleton {
  factory Singleton() =>
    const Singleton._internal_();
  const Singleton._internal_();
}


void main() {
  print(new Singleton() == new Singleton());
  print(identical(new Singleton() , new Singleton()));
}

Here is another possible way:

void main() {
  var s1 = Singleton.instance;
  s1.somedata = 123;
  var s2 = Singleton.instance;
  print(s2.somedata); // 123
  print(identical(s1, s2));  // true
  print(s1 == s2); // true
  //var s3 = new Singleton(); //produces a warning re missing default constructor and breaks on execution
}

class Singleton {
  static final Singleton _singleton = new Singleton._internal();
  Singleton._internal();
  static Singleton get instance => _singleton;
  var somedata;
}

Here's a concise example that combines the other solutions. Accessing the singleton can be done by:

  • Using a singleton global variable that points to the instance.
  • The common Singleton.instance pattern.
  • Using the default constructor, which is a factory that returns the instance.

Note: You should implement only one of the three options so that code using the singleton is consistent.

Singleton get singleton => Singleton.instance;
ComplexSingleton get complexSingleton => ComplexSingleton._instance;

class Singleton {
  static final Singleton instance = Singleton._private();
  Singleton._private();
  factory Singleton() => instance;
}

class ComplexSingleton {
  static ComplexSingleton _instance;
  static ComplexSingleton get instance => _instance;
  static void init(arg) => _instance ??= ComplexSingleton._init(arg);

  final property;
  ComplexSingleton._init(this.property);
  factory ComplexSingleton() => _instance;
}

If you need to do complex initialization, you'll just have to do so before using the instance later in the program.

Example

void main() {
  print(identical(singleton, Singleton.instance));        // true
  print(identical(singleton, Singleton()));               // true
  print(complexSingleton == null);                        // true
  ComplexSingleton.init(0); 
  print(complexSingleton == null);                        // false
  print(identical(complexSingleton, ComplexSingleton())); // true
}

This should work.

class GlobalStore {
    static GlobalStore _instance;
    static GlobalStore get instance {
       if(_instance == null)
           _instance = new GlobalStore()._();
       return _instance;
    }

    _(){

    }
    factory GlobalStore()=> instance;


}
  • Please don't post follow-up questions as answers. The issue with this code is that it is a bit verbose. static GlobalStore get instance => _instance ??= new GlobalStore._(); would do. What is _(){} supposed to do? This seems redundant. – Günter Zöchbauer Oct 13 at 8:35
  • sorry, that was a suggestion, not a follow up question, _(){} will create a private constructor right ? – Vilsad P P Oct 13 at 8:40
  • Constructors start with the class name. This is just a normal private instance method without a return type specified. – Günter Zöchbauer Oct 13 at 8:42
  • Sorry for the downvote, but I think it's poor quality and doesn't add any value in addition to the existing answers. – Günter Zöchbauer Oct 13 at 9:30
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Karl Richter Oct 14 at 8:55

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