20

I mean for example I can create table like

create table XTable
( 
  idt int not null primary key,
  value nvarchar(50),
  idq int,
  constraint fk_idq foreign key(idq) references YTable(idq)
)

and I can create it like this

create table XTable
(
  idt int not null primary key,
  value nvarchar(50),
  idq int,
  foreign key(idq) references YTable(idq)
)

I usually create table like in the second example but now I'm curious about the first example. What is the difference?

15

The first option is purely for nameing the constraint.

From SQL FOREIGN KEY Constraint

To allow naming of a FOREIGN KEY constraint, and for defining a FOREIGN KEY constraint on multiple columns, use the following SQL syntax

CREATE TABLE Orders
 (
 O_Id int NOT NULL,
 OrderNo int NOT NULL,
 P_Id int,
 PRIMARY KEY (O_Id),
 CONSTRAINT fk_PerOrders FOREIGN KEY (P_Id)
 REFERENCES Persons(P_Id)
 )

Also, from CREATE TABLE (Transact-SQL) one can see that [ CONSTRAINT constraint_name ] is optional.

  • 3
    Noob question: what benefits does naming the constraint offer? – Brad Turek Dec 19 '17 at 22:39
15

The first one assigns a user-defined name to the foreign key, the second one will assign a system-generated name to the foreign key.

User-defined foreign key names can be useful for subsequent statements like these:

ALTER TABLE XTable DROP    CONSTRAINT fk_idq;
ALTER TABLE XTable ENABLE  CONSTRAINT fk_idq;
ALTER TABLE XTable DISABLE CONSTRAINT fk_idq;

It's harder to alter constraints with system-generated names, as you have to discover those names first.

  • So the only use of CONSTRAINT is to have an easier way to DROP, ENABLE or DISABLE a constraint? Is it recommended to name all constraints? – displayname Sep 24 '15 at 18:21
  • 1
    @StefanFalk: I would always explicitly name all objects in the database as I've only seen regrets when things haven't been done this way, later on when a project goes into maintenance. In fact, it is wise to define a naming scheme where constraints can be visually associated with their tables easily by their name. Looks like a good blog post topic, in fact. – Lukas Eder Sep 27 '15 at 8:01
  • This makes sense. My naming schema for foreign keys is fk__referencing_table_name__referenced_table_name which unfortunately produces quite large names sometimes. :) – displayname Sep 28 '15 at 9:43
  • 2
    @StefanFalk: I've seen systems where each table had an official, 4-letter abbreviations, such as: ACCOUNTS -> ACCO, ACCOUNT_ TRANSACTIONS -> ACTR, ACOUNT_ TRANSACTION_ DETAILS -> ACTD. Those abbreviations could then be used for all derived names, such as constraints, indexes, views, aliases (in joins) etc. – Lukas Eder Sep 28 '15 at 10:42
3

Apart from controlling the name, nothing really. SQL Server will supply a name if you omit it. FYI, you only need this syntax (SQL Fiddle):

create table XTable
(
  idt int not null primary key,
  value nvarchar(50),
  idq int references YTable(idq)
)

Here's a fuller example.

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