Is there a way to add created_at and updated_at fields to a mongoose schema, without having to pass them in everytime new MyModel() is called?

The created_at field would be a date and only added when a document is created. The updated_at field would be updated with new date whenever save() is called on a document.

I have tried this in my schema, but the field does not show up unless I expcitly add it:

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name    : { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
  , created_at    : { type: Date, required: true, default: Date.now }
});
  • I did exactly what you did and it worked. Using Mongoose 4.8.4. Might be a new thing? – martinedwards Nov 21 at 11:54
  • 1
    this was from quite awhile ago. – chovy Nov 22 at 12:26
  • Yeah, thought it was worth noting that the above now works. – martinedwards Nov 29 at 11:34

16 Answers 16

up vote 21 down vote accepted

If use update() or findOneAndUpdate()

with {upsert: true} option

you can use $setOnInsert

var update = {
  updatedAt: new Date(),
  $setOnInsert: {
    createdAt: new Date()
  }
};
  • 2
    Nice and elegant – Bhargav Nanekalva May 27 '15 at 13:30
  • 1
    this works in most mongo libraries. changing to accepted answer – chovy Dec 11 '16 at 9:16
  • 1
    If you are using Mogo's default _id field, then you do not need a createdAt field. Check my answer below for more details. – Pavel Nikolov Dec 14 '16 at 0:40
  • 1
    ... check my ORIGINAL ANSWER. – Pavel Nikolov Dec 19 '16 at 0:18
  • 9
    everybody just scroollll down...... lower.... – softcode Mar 8 '17 at 6:07

UPDATE: (5 years later)

Note: If you decide to use Kappa Architecture (Event Sourcing + CQRS), then you do not need updated date at all. Since your data is an immutable, append-only event log, you only ever need event created date. Similar to the Lambda Architecture, described below. Then your application state is a projection of the event log (derived data). If you receive a subsequent event about existing entity, then you'll use that event's created date as updated date for your entity. This is a commonly used (and commonly misunderstood) practice in miceroservice systems.

UPDATE: (4 years later)

If you use ObjectId as your _id field (which is usually the case), then all you need to do is:

let document = {
  updatedAt: new Date(),
}

Check my original answer below on how to get the created timestamp from the _id field. If you need to use IDs from external system, then check Roman Rhrn Nesterov's answer.

UPDATE: (2.5 years later)

You can now use the #timestamps option with mongoose version >= 4.0.

let ItemSchema = new Schema({
  name: { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
},
{
  timestamps: true
});

If set timestamps, mongoose assigns createdAt and updatedAt fields to your schema, the type assigned is Date.

You can also specify the timestamp fileds' names:

timestamps: { createdAt: 'created_at', updatedAt: 'updated_at' }

Note: If you are working on a big application with critical data you should reconsider updating your documents. I would advise you to work with immutable, append-only data (lambda architecture). What this means is that you only ever allow inserts. Updates and deletes should not be allowed! If you would like to "delete" a record, you could easily insert a new version of the document with some timestamp/version filed and then set a deleted field to true. Similarly if you want to update a document – you create a new one with the appropriate fields updated and the rest of the fields copied over.Then in order to query this document you would get the one with the newest timestamp or the highest version which is not "deleted" (the deleted field is undefined or false`).

Data immutability ensures that your data is debuggable – you can trace the history of every document. You can also rollback to previous version of a document if something goes wrong. If you go with such an architecture ObjectId.getTimestamp() is all you need, and it is not Mongoose dependent.


ORIGINAL ANSWER:

If you are using ObjectId as your identity field you don't need created_at field. ObjectIds have a method called getTimestamp().

ObjectId("507c7f79bcf86cd7994f6c0e").getTimestamp()

This will return the following output:

ISODate("2012-10-15T21:26:17Z")

More info here How do I extract the created date out of a Mongo ObjectID

In order to add updated_at filed you need to use this:

var ArticleSchema = new Schema({
  updated_at: { type: Date }
  // rest of the fields go here
});

ArticleSchema.pre('save', function(next) {
  this.updated_at = Date.now();
  next();
});
  • 3
    How do you do that in Mongoose/node.js? – Zebra Propulsion Lab Sep 16 '13 at 20:44
  • 5
    That's worth knowing even if it's not the solution that gets used, very interesting! – unwitting Aug 9 '14 at 10:47
  • But if i want to pass the create at date to the view, i would need to set special variable for this, or pass the id right? – user3052629 Nov 9 '15 at 20:04
  • That's very valuable information! but i have one worry, with this method (immutable data), the database, will grow big very fast! especially in an application where updates occur a lot! – Xsmael Jun 18 '16 at 12:47
  • 2
    I appreciate the initial answer but advocating for using lambda architecture also sounds like a great way to solve 5x levels of meta problems and possibly never deliver rather than building the CRUD app and keeping it simple unless the complexity of this approach is truly warranted. Remember you are posting about MongoDB which 'barely' scales out to begin with and you are advocating for a new record for every write which will quickly kill Mongo at any meaningful scale. Move this to the Cassandra section... – John Culviner Apr 28 '17 at 20:32

This is what I ended up doing:

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name    : { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
  , created_at    : { type: Date }
  , updated_at    : { type: Date }
});


ItemSchema.pre('save', function(next){
  now = new Date();
  this.updated_at = now;
  if ( !this.created_at ) {
    this.created_at = now;
  }
  next();
});
  • 8
    1. Store the current time in a local var and assign it instead of each time calling new Date(), this will make sure that at first pass created_at and updated_at have the same excect value. 2. new Date => new Date() – Shay Erlichmen Oct 27 '13 at 9:22
  • 13
    Would just like to point out that if you use ObjectId then you can get the created_at from there....you do not need a separate field. Check out getTimestamp() – Xerri Nov 26 '13 at 15:58
  • 6
    Other option for the created_at could be to change the model to -> created_at: { type: Date, default: Date.now }, – OscarVGG Jan 19 '14 at 4:47
  • 1
    @ajbraus Make a schema plugin – wlingke Jul 3 '15 at 16:48
  • 2
    also use Date.now() where possible instead of new Date its faster as it is a static method – karlkurzer Feb 5 '16 at 23:27

Use the built-in timestamps option for your Schema.

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name: { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
},
{
    timestamps: true
});

This will automatically add createdAt and updatedAt fields to your schema.

http://mongoosejs.com/docs/guide.html#timestamps

  • 1
    Requires mongoose version >= 4.0 – Jensen Oct 19 '16 at 13:23
  • 2
    I find the docs unclear - this adds the fields, but does it also make sure they're updated on every update? – Ludwik Nov 4 '16 at 9:34
  • generally, createdAt is always only stored once...when object is created. updatedAt is updated on each new save (when the obj is changed) – codyc4321 Dec 2 '16 at 1:05
  • 1
    I got this "2016-12-07T11:46:46.066Z".. Could please explain time stamp format, how change time zone?? is take mongoDB server time zone?? – Mahesh K Dec 7 '16 at 11:52
  • @mcompeau, Thank you for the answer! I know it's a long shot, but do you remember by any chance if fields created this way can be used as index? – manidos Aug 25 '17 at 18:31

As of Mongoose 4.0 you can now set a timestamps option on the Schema to have Mongoose handle this for you:

var thingSchema = new Schema({..}, { timestamps: true });

You can change the name of the fields used like so:

var thingSchema = new Schema({..}, { timestamps: { createdAt: 'created_at' } });

http://mongoosejs.com/docs/guide.html#timestamps

  • 2
    Seems like the best solution imo. Upvoted. – Jake Wilson Oct 24 '15 at 3:52
  • 1
    Agreed, this is the best option in Mongoose 4.0. – Tadd Giles Nov 18 '15 at 20:58

Add timestamps to your Schema like this then createdAt and updatedAt will automatic generate for you

var UserSchema = new Schema({
    email: String,
    views: { type: Number, default: 0 },
    status: Boolean
}, { timestamps: {} });

enter image description here
Also you can change createdAt -> created_at by

timestamps: { createdAt: 'created_at', updatedAt: 'updated_at' }
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer – Martin De Simone Aug 29 '17 at 17:37
  • 1
    Now that Mongoose does all this work for you, I agree that this is the best solution now. – Vince Bowdren May 1 at 14:45

This is how I achieved having created and updated.

Inside my schema I added the created and updated like so:

   /**
     * Article Schema
     */
    var ArticleSchema = new Schema({
        created: {
            type: Date,
            default: Date.now
        },
        updated: {
            type: Date,
            default: Date.now
        },
        title: {
            type: String,
            default: '',
            trim: true,
            required: 'Title cannot be blank'
        },
        content: {
            type: String,
            default: '',
            trim: true
        },
        user: {
            type: Schema.ObjectId,
            ref: 'User'
        }
    });

Then in my article update method inside the article controller I added:

/**
     * Update a article
     */
    exports.update = function(req, res) {
        var article = req.article;

        article = _.extend(article, req.body);
        article.set("updated", Date.now());

        article.save(function(err) {
            if (err) {
                return res.status(400).send({
                    message: errorHandler.getErrorMessage(err)
                });
            } else {
                res.json(article);
            }
        });
    };

The bold sections are the parts of interest.

You can use the timestamp plugin of mongoose-troop to add this behavior to any schema.

You can use this plugin very easily. From the docs:

var timestamps = require('mongoose-timestamp');
var UserSchema = new Schema({
    username: String
});
UserSchema.plugin(timestamps);
mongoose.model('User', UserSchema);
var User = mongoose.model('User', UserSchema)

And also set the name of the fields if you wish:

mongoose.plugin(timestamps,  {
  createdAt: 'created_at', 
  updatedAt: 'updated_at'
});

we may can achieve this by using schema plugin also.

In helpers/schemaPlugin.js file

module.exports = function(schema) {

  var updateDate = function(next){
    var self = this;
    self.updated_at = new Date();
    if ( !self.created_at ) {
      self.created_at = now;
    }
    next()
  };
  // update date for bellow 4 methods
  schema.pre('save', updateDate)
    .pre('update', updateDate)
    .pre('findOneAndUpdate', updateDate)
    .pre('findByIdAndUpdate', updateDate);
};

and in models/ItemSchema.js file:

var mongoose = require('mongoose'),
  Schema   = mongoose.Schema,
  SchemaPlugin = require('../helpers/schemaPlugin');

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
  name    : { type: String, required: true, trim: true },
  created_at    : { type: Date },
  updated_at    : { type: Date }
});
ItemSchema.plugin(SchemaPlugin);
module.exports = mongoose.model('Item', ItemSchema);

My mongoose version is 4.10.2

Seems only the hook findOneAndUpdate is work

ModelSchema.pre('findOneAndUpdate', function(next) {
  // console.log('pre findOneAndUpdate ....')
  this.update({},{ $set: { updatedAt: new Date() } });
  next()
})
const mongoose = require('mongoose');
const config = require('config');
const util = require('util');

const Schema = mongoose.Schema;
const BaseSchema = function(obj, options) {
  if (typeof(options) == 'undefined') {
    options = {};
  }
  if (typeof(options['timestamps']) == 'undefined') {
    options['timestamps'] = true;
  }

  Schema.apply(this, [obj, options]);
};
util.inherits(BaseSchema, Schema);

var testSchema = new BaseSchema({
  jsonObject: { type: Object }
  , stringVar : { type: String }
});

Now you can use this, so that there is no need to include this option in every table

I actually do this in the back

If all goes well with the updating:

 // All ifs passed successfully. Moving on the Model.save
    Model.lastUpdated = Date.now(); // <------ Now!
    Model.save(function (err, result) {
      if (err) {
        return res.status(500).json({
          title: 'An error occured',
          error: err
        });
      }
      res.status(200).json({
        message: 'Model Updated',
        obj: result
      });
    });

Use machinepack-datetime to format the datetime.

tutorialSchema.virtual('createdOn').get(function () {
    const DateTime = require('machinepack-datetime');
    let timeAgoString = "";
    try {
        timeAgoString = DateTime.timeFrom({
            toWhen: DateTime.parse({
                datetime: this.createdAt
            }).execSync(),
            fromWhen: new Date().getTime()
        }).execSync();
    } catch(err) {
        console.log('error getting createdon', err);
    }
    return timeAgoString; // a second ago
});

Machine pack is great with clear API unlike express or general Javascript world.

Use a function to return the computed default value:

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name: {
      type: String,
      required: true,
      trim: true
    },
    created_at: {
      type: Date,
      default: function(){
        return Date.now();
      }
    },
    updated_at: {
      type: Date,
      default: function(){
        return Date.now();
      }
    }
});

ItemSchema.pre('save', function(done) {
  this.updated_at = Date.now();
  done();
});
  • no need to wrap Date.now() in a function just do: ...default: Date.now() – karlkurzer Feb 5 '16 at 23:23
  • 1
    I wrap it in a function so I can mock '.now()' in tests. Otherwise it's only run once during initialization and the value can't easily be changed. – orourkedd Feb 5 '16 at 23:28
  • 1
    Note that default: Date.now() would be wrong. If anything it's default: Date.now. Otherwise all your documents will have the same timestamp: The time when your application started ;) – Max Truxa Aug 9 '16 at 18:11
  • I like your default: Date.now strategy. much cleaner. – orourkedd Aug 10 '16 at 4:13
  • why the downvote? – orourkedd Aug 10 '16 at 4:14

You can use middleware and virtuals. Here is an example for your updated_at field:

ItemSchema.virtual('name').set(function (name) {
  this.updated_at = Date.now;
  return name;
});
  • When would this actually get set? and will it persist? So 3 days from now, it would still have a date from 3 days ago? – chovy Oct 1 '12 at 9:21
  • the virtual will be called whenever you change the given property, in this case name. And yes, it should be persistent. – zemirco Oct 1 '12 at 9:29
  • would this work for all fields on Item object? I"m not sure this solution does what I want – chovy Oct 3 '12 at 9:41

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