326

What is the recommended way to zerofill a value in JavaScript? I imagine I could build a custom function to pad zeros on to a typecasted value, but I'm wondering if there is a more direct way to do this?

Note: By "zerofilled" I mean it in the database sense of the word (where a 6-digit zerofilled representation of the number 5 would be "000005").

  • This really isn't enough information to answer. The most common instance of "zero padding" is probably probably prepending zeroes onto dates: 5/1/2008 > 05/01/2008. Is that what you mean? – Triptych Aug 12 '09 at 16:38
  • 6
    For node apps, use npm install sprintf-js, and require it in the file you need: sprintf('%0d6', 5); – Droogans Nov 12 '14 at 19:27
  • function padWithZeroes(n, width) { while(n.length<width) n = '0' + n; return n;} ...assuming n not negative – Paolo Feb 18 '16 at 23:52
  • @Paolo that function doesn't work if n is numeric. You'd need to convert n to a String before the while in order to access n.length – Nick F Jun 3 '16 at 10:28
  • @NickF of course... and assuming 'n' is a string. – Paolo Jun 3 '16 at 10:46

68 Answers 68

186

Note to readers!

As commenters have pointed out, this solution is "clever", and as clever solutions often are, it's memory intensive and relatively slow. If performance is a concern for you, don't use this solution!

Potentially outdated: ECMAScript 2017 includes String.prototype.padStart and Number.prototype.toLocaleString is there since ECMAScript 3.1. Example:

var n=-0.1;
n.toLocaleString('en', {minimumIntegerDigits:4,minimumFractionDigits:2,useGrouping:false})

...will output "-0000.10".

// or 
const padded = (.1+"").padStart(6,"0");
`-${padded}`

...will output "-0000.1".

A simple function is all you need

function zeroFill( number, width )
{
  width -= number.toString().length;
  if ( width > 0 )
  {
    return new Array( width + (/\./.test( number ) ? 2 : 1) ).join( '0' ) + number;
  }
  return number + ""; // always return a string
}

you could bake this into a library if you want to conserve namespace or whatever. Like with jQuery's extend.

  • 1
    Now you just need to take care of numbers like 50.1234 and you've got a readable version of my solution below! I did, however, assume that we were just left padding, not overall padding. – coderjoe Aug 12 '09 at 20:16
  • 5
    Not a fan of creating a new array each time you want to pad a value. Readers should be aware of the the potential memory and GC impact if they're doing large #'s of these (e.g. on a node.js server that's doing 1000's of these operations per second. @profitehlolz's answer would seem to be the better solution.) – broofa Sep 24 '12 at 12:21
  • 6
    This does not work for negative values: zeroFill(-10, 7) -> "0000-10" – digitalbath Nov 7 '12 at 15:20
  • 2
    Performance measure amongst three top answers here: jsperf.com/left-zero-pad – tomsmeding Feb 21 '14 at 16:35
  • 9
    As of ECMAScript 2017, there's a build-in function padStart. – Tomas Nikodym Sep 11 '16 at 21:23
290

Simple way. You could add string multiplication for the pad and turn it into a function.

var pad = "000000";
var n = '5';
var result = (pad+n).slice(-pad.length);

As a function,

function paddy(num, padlen, padchar) {
    var pad_char = typeof padchar !== 'undefined' ? padchar : '0';
    var pad = new Array(1 + padlen).join(pad_char);
    return (pad + num).slice(-pad.length);
}
var fu = paddy(14, 5); // 00014
var bar = paddy(2, 4, '#'); // ###2
  • 85
    This is a very nice solution, best I've seen. For clarity, here's a simpler version I'm using to pad the minutes in time formatting: ('0'+minutes).slice(-2) – Luke Ehresman Sep 14 '12 at 0:22
  • 15
    This is 5 times slower than the implementation with a while loop: gist.github.com/4382935 – andrewrk Dec 26 '12 at 20:37
  • 38
    This has a FATAL FLAW with larger than expected numbers -- which is an extremely common occurrence. For example, paddy (888, 2) yields 88 and not 888 as required. This answer also does not handle negative numbers. – Brock Adams Jun 15 '13 at 22:20
  • 8
    @BrockAdams, zerofill is typically used for fixed width number/formatting cases -- therefore I think it'd actually be less likely (or even a non-issue) if given a 3 digit number when trying to do 2 digit zerofill. – Seaux Dec 8 '13 at 23:15
  • 8
    Performance measure amongst three top answers here: jsperf.com/left-zero-pad – tomsmeding Feb 21 '14 at 16:36
251

I can't believe all the complex answers on here... Just use this:

var zerofilled = ('0000'+n).slice(-4);
  • 20
    Good except for negative numbers and numbers longer than 4 digits. – wberry Sep 19 '14 at 22:40
  • 8
    @wberry this was not intended to be production ready code, but more a simple explanation of the basics to solving the question at hand. Aka it's very easy to determine if a number is positive or negative and add the appropriate sign if needed, so i didn't want to cluster my easy example with that. Also, it's just as easy to make a function taking a digit length as an arg and using that instead of my hardcoded values. – Seaux Sep 21 '14 at 4:13
  • 4
    This seems like a good solution for simple cases. Easier to understand. – Artur Carvalho Jan 28 '15 at 12:23
  • 2
    @OmShankar by "complex answers", I wasn't referring to explained or detailed answers (which are obviously encouraged on this site even though my answer isn't), but rather answers that contained unnecessary code complexity. – Seaux Aug 10 '15 at 23:10
  • 3
    I like this answer. In my own specific case, I know that the numbers are always positive and never more than 3 digits, and this is often the case when you're padding with leading 0's and your input is well known. Nice! – Patrick Chu Dec 16 '16 at 22:12
104

I actually had to come up with something like this recently. I figured there had to be a way to do it without using loops.

This is what I came up with.

function zeroPad(num, numZeros) {
    var n = Math.abs(num);
    var zeros = Math.max(0, numZeros - Math.floor(n).toString().length );
    var zeroString = Math.pow(10,zeros).toString().substr(1);
    if( num < 0 ) {
        zeroString = '-' + zeroString;
    }

    return zeroString+n;
}

Then just use it providing a number to zero pad:

> zeroPad(50,4);
"0050"

If the number is larger than the padding, the number will expand beyond the padding:

> zeroPad(51234, 3);
"51234"

Decimals are fine too!

> zeroPad(51.1234, 4);
"0051.1234"

If you don't mind polluting the global namespace you can add it to Number directly:

Number.prototype.leftZeroPad = function(numZeros) {
    var n = Math.abs(this);
    var zeros = Math.max(0, numZeros - Math.floor(n).toString().length );
    var zeroString = Math.pow(10,zeros).toString().substr(1);
    if( this < 0 ) {
        zeroString = '-' + zeroString;
    }

    return zeroString+n;
}

And if you'd rather have decimals take up space in the padding:

Number.prototype.leftZeroPad = function(numZeros) {
    var n = Math.abs(this);
    var zeros = Math.max(0, numZeros - n.toString().length );
    var zeroString = Math.pow(10,zeros).toString().substr(1);
    if( this < 0 ) {
        zeroString = '-' + zeroString;
    }

    return zeroString+n;
}

Cheers!



XDR came up with a logarithmic variation that seems to perform better.

WARNING: This function fails if num equals zero (e.g. zeropad(0, 2))

function zeroPad (num, numZeros) {
    var an = Math.abs (num);
    var digitCount = 1 + Math.floor (Math.log (an) / Math.LN10);
    if (digitCount >= numZeros) {
        return num;
    }
    var zeroString = Math.pow (10, numZeros - digitCount).toString ().substr (1);
    return num < 0 ? '-' + zeroString + an : zeroString + an;
}

Speaking of performance, tomsmeding compared the top 3 answers (4 with the log variation). Guess which one majorly outperformed the other two? :)

  • 9
    This is good, I like how it's readable and robust. The only thing I would change is the name of the numZeros parameter, since it's misleading. It's not the number of zeros you want to add, it's the minimum length the number should be. A better name would be numLength or even length. – Senseful Jan 2 '12 at 4:23
  • 13
    +1. Unlike the higher voted answers, this one handles negative numbers and does not return gross errors on overflow!!?! – Brock Adams Jun 15 '13 at 22:39
  • 10
    Performance measure amongst three top answers here: jsperf.com/left-zero-pad – tomsmeding Feb 21 '14 at 16:36
  • 4
    I improved the performance of this answer by over 100% by using logarithms. Please see the logarithmic test case at http://jsperf.com/left-zero-pad/10 – XDR Aug 18 '14 at 4:30
  • 2
    The original solution is better, logarithmic variation doesn't work if num can be zero... – Ondra C. Mar 17 '15 at 10:03
56

Here's what I used to pad a number up to 7 characters.

("0000000" + number).slice(-7)

This approach will probably suffice for most people.

Edit: If you want to make it more generic you can do this:

("0".repeat(padding) + number).slice(-padding)
  • This fails, badly, on large numbers and negative numbers. number = 123456789, with the code, above, for example. – Brock Adams Jun 15 '13 at 22:49
  • This solution is the best possible ever for certains scenarios! I've got no clue why we didn't come up with this before. The scenario is: you've got a number which is always positive [as Brock mentioned] and you know that it won't take more characters than your limit. In our case we have a score which we store in Amazon SDB. As you know SDB can't compare numbers, so all scores have to be zero padded. This is extremely easy and effective! – Krystian Oct 10 '13 at 11:27
  • 2
    Apologies, I should have mentioned that this won't work for negative numbers. I think this deals with the more common positive number case, though. It does what I need, at least! – chetbox Oct 16 '13 at 11:33
  • Needed this again and realised you don't need new String. You can just use string literals. – chetbox Mar 4 '16 at 15:56
  • 2
    (new Array(padding + 1).join("0") can be replaced with "0".repeat(padding) – Pavel Jun 22 '17 at 16:17
24

Unfortunately, there are a lot of needless complicated suggestions for this problem, typically involving writing your own function to do math or string manipulation or calling a third-party utility. However, there is a standard way of doing this in the base JavaScript library with just one line of code. It might be worth wrapping this one line of code in a function to avoid having to specify parameters that you never want to change like the local name or style.

var amount = 5;

var text = amount.toLocaleString('en-US',
{
    style: 'decimal',
    minimumIntegerDigits: 3,
    useGrouping: false
});

This will produce the value of "005" for text. You can also use the toLocaleString function of Number to pad zeros to the right side of the decimal point.

var amount = 5;

var text = amount.toLocaleString('en-US',
{
    style: 'decimal',
    minimumFractionDigits: 2,
    useGrouping: false
});

This will produce the value of "5.00" for text. Change useGrouping to true to use comma separators for thousands.

Note that using toLocaleString() with locales and options arguments is standardized separately in ECMA-402, not in ECMAScript. As of today, some browsers only implement basic support, i.e. toLocaleString() may ignore any arguments.

Complete Example

  • Wow, this is a super clean solution and works in node.js. – jishi Feb 6 '16 at 22:21
  • I chuckled when I read the intro -- "needless complicated suggestions". Software development, as in all engineering disciplines, involves weighing trade-offs. I tried this "standard way" myself -- and timed it. It definitely works, but I would never choose to use it for any kind of repetitive application due to how slow it is compared to many of the other "home rolled" solutions. – bearvarine Sep 16 '17 at 20:47
  • True, a lot of built-in JavaScript functions perform poorly when looping over lots of data, but I would argue you should not use JavaScript for that, even server-side like Node.js. If you have lots of data to process server-side, you should use a better platform like .NET or Java. If you are processing client-side data for display to the end user, you should only process the data for what you are currently rendering to the end user's screen. For example, render only the visible rows of a table and don't process data for other roads. – Daniel Barbalace Jul 23 '18 at 21:03
20

If the fill number is known in advance not to exceed a certain value, there's another way to do this with no loops:

var fillZeroes = "00000000000000000000";  // max number of zero fill ever asked for in global

function zeroFill(number, width) {
    // make sure it's a string
    var input = number + "";  
    var prefix = "";
    if (input.charAt(0) === '-') {
        prefix = "-";
        input = input.slice(1);
        --width;
    }
    var fillAmt = Math.max(width - input.length, 0);
    return prefix + fillZeroes.slice(0, fillAmt) + input;
}

Test cases here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/N87mZ/

  • @BrockAdams - fixed for both cases you mention. If the number is already as wide as the fill width, then no fill is added. – jfriend00 Jun 16 '13 at 1:08
  • Thanks; +1. The negative numbers are slightly off from the usual convention, though. In your test case, -88 should yield "-00088", for example. – Brock Adams Jun 16 '13 at 1:57
  • 1
    @BrockAdams - I wasn't sure whether calling zeroFill(-88, 5) should produce -00088 or -0088? I guess it depends upon whether you want the width argument to be the entire width of the number or just the number of digits (not including the negative sign). An implementer can easily switch the behavior to not include the negative sign by just removing the --width line of code. – jfriend00 Jun 16 '13 at 3:07
19

In a proposed (stage 3) ES2017 method .padStart() you can simply now do (when implemented/supported):

string.padStart(maxLength, "0"); //max length is the max string length, not max # of fills
  • I've been looking for this one for some time now. Thank you for giving some visibility. I hope in 2030 we have it working. – dinigo Jun 20 '17 at 10:55
  • 1
    Its works now @dinigo ^^ it is live – Paulo Roberto Nov 22 '17 at 12:47
  • yep, I've used it a couple of times – dinigo Nov 22 '17 at 13:02
18

The quick and dirty way:

y = (new Array(count + 1 - x.toString().length)).join('0') + x;

For x = 5 and count = 6 you'll have y = "000005"

  • 1
    I got y="0005" with the above, y = (new Array(count + 1 - x.toString().length)).join('0') + x; is what gave me y="000005" – forforf May 23 '12 at 15:30
  • @forforf thanks, corrected it now! – Johann Philipp Strathausen May 24 '12 at 22:48
  • Thanks. I always like the shortest code solution. – Orr Siloni Nov 12 '12 at 14:08
  • 3
    @OrrSiloni: the shortest code solution is actually ('0000'+n).slice(-4) – Seaux Dec 8 '13 at 23:17
12

Here's a quick function I came up with to do the job. If anyone has a simpler approach, feel free to share!

function zerofill(number, length) {
    // Setup
    var result = number.toString();
    var pad = length - result.length;

    while(pad > 0) {
        result = '0' + result;
        pad--;
    }

    return result;
}
  • I don't think there will be a "simpler" solution - it will always be a function of some sort. We could have a algorithm discussion, but at the end of the day, you'll still end up with a function that zerofills a number. – Peter Bailey Aug 12 '09 at 17:54
  • My general advice is to use "for" loops as they are generally more stable and faster in ECMAScript languages (ActionScript 1-3, and JavaScript) – cwallenpoole Aug 12 '09 at 18:03
  • Or, skip iteration altogether ;) – Peter Bailey Aug 12 '09 at 20:05
  • Simpler function? Probably not. One that doesn't loop? That is possible... though the algorithm isn't entirely trivial. – coderjoe Aug 12 '09 at 20:09
  • 1
    Wow, pretty much all the above comments are incorrect. @profitehlolz's solution is simpler and suitable for inlining (doesn't need to be a function). Meanwhile, for .vs. while performance is not different enough to be interesting: jsperf.com/fors-vs-while/34 – broofa Sep 24 '12 at 12:07
11

Late to the party here, but I often use this construct for doing ad-hoc padding of some value n, known to be a positive, decimal:

(offset + n + '').substr(1);

Where offset is 10^^digits.

E.g. Padding to 5 digits, where n = 123:

(1e5 + 123 + '').substr(1); // => 00123

The hexidecimal version of this is slightly more verbose:

(0x100000 + 0x123).toString(16).substr(1); // => 00123

Note 1: I like @profitehlolz's solution as well, which is the string version of this, using slice()'s nifty negative-index feature.

  • Very elegant and neat! – Marc Feb 13 '13 at 9:42
11

I really don't know why, but no one did it in the most obvious way. Here it's my implementation.

Function:

/** Pad a number with 0 on the left */
function zeroPad(number, digits) {
    var num = number+"";
    while(num.length < digits){
        num='0'+num;
    }
    return num;
}

Prototype:

Number.prototype.zeroPad=function(digits){
    var num=this+"";
    while(num.length < digits){
        num='0'+num;
    }
    return(num);
};

Very straightforward, I can't see any way how this can be any simpler. For some reason I've seem many times here on SO, people just try to avoid 'for' and 'while' loops at any cost. Using regex will probably cost way more cycles for such a trivial 8 digit padding.

9

I use this snipet to get a 5 digits representation

(value+100000).toString().slice(-5) // "00123" with value=123
  • this is a smart way to add leading zero . I have done something similar to add leading zero for fixed length binary integer – Chris.Huang May 11 '15 at 2:14
8

The power of Math!

x = integer to pad
y = number of zeroes to pad

function zeroPad(x, y)
{
   y = Math.max(y-1,0);
   var n = (x / Math.pow(10,y)).toFixed(y);
   return n.replace('.','');  
}
  • Wow, that is a very clever way to solve this problem. I already had my own solution for this that is exactly functionally equivalent, and even relatively short, but this is concise and probably quite fast. – pseudosavant Jan 9 '14 at 21:10
8

I didn't see anyone point out the fact that when you use String.prototype.substr() with a negative number it counts from the right.

A one liner solution to the OP's question, a 6-digit zerofilled representation of the number 5, is:

console.log(("00000000" + 5).substr(-6));

Generalizing we'll get:

function pad(num, len) { return ("00000000" + num).substr(-len) };

console.log(pad(5, 6));
console.log(pad(45, 6));
console.log(pad(345, 6));
console.log(pad(2345, 6));
console.log(pad(12345, 6));

  • nice one liner solution – rave Sep 21 '17 at 21:06
7

First parameter is any real number, second parameter is a positive integer specifying the minimum number of digits to the left of the decimal point and third parameter is an optional positive integer specifying the number if digits to the right of the decimal point.

function zPad(n, l, r){
    return(a=String(n).match(/(^-?)(\d*)\.?(\d*)/))?a[1]+(Array(l).join(0)+a[2]).slice(-Math.max(l,a[2].length))+('undefined'!==typeof r?(0<r?'.':'')+(a[3]+Array(r+1).join(0)).slice(0,r):a[3]?'.'+a[3]:''):0
}

so

           zPad(6, 2) === '06'
          zPad(-6, 2) === '-06'
       zPad(600.2, 2) === '600.2'
        zPad(-600, 2) === '-600'
         zPad(6.2, 3) === '006.2'
        zPad(-6.2, 3) === '-006.2'
      zPad(6.2, 3, 0) === '006'
        zPad(6, 2, 3) === '06.000'
    zPad(600.2, 2, 3) === '600.200'
zPad(-600.1499, 2, 3) === '-600.149'
7

Don't reinvent the wheel, use underscore string:

jsFiddle

var numToPad = '5';

alert(_.str.pad(numToPad, 6, '0')); // yields: '000005'
  • 1
    Pure JavaScript! Short and simple, and a jsFiddle example! EXCELLENT! :D – tfont Oct 10 '14 at 23:41
7

This is the ES6 solution.

function pad(num, len) {
  return '0'.repeat(len - num.toString().length) + num;
}
alert(pad(1234,6));

  • Clearly the most elegant solution I would just modify it to avoid 2 string conversions: const numStr = String(num) and return '0'.repeat(len - numStr.length) + numStr; – ngryman Sep 26 '16 at 21:52
6

After a, long, long time of testing 15 different functions/methods found in this questions answers, I now know which is the best (the most versatile and quickest).

I took 15 functions/methods from the answers to this question and made a script to measure the time taken to execute 100 pads. Each pad would pad the number 9 with 2000 zeros. This may seem excessive, and it is, but it gives you a good idea about the scaling of the functions.

The code I used can be found here: https://gist.github.com/NextToNothing/6325915

Feel free to modify and test the code yourself.

In order to get the most versatile method, you have to use a loop. This is because with very large numbers others are likely to fail, whereas, this will succeed.

So, which loop to use? Well, that would be a while loop. A for loop is still fast, but a while loop is just slightly quicker(a couple of ms) - and cleaner.

Answers like those by Wilco, Aleksandar Toplek or Vitim.us will do the job perfectly.

Personally, I tried a different approach. I tried to use a recursive function to pad the string/number. It worked out better than methods joining an array but, still, didn't work as quick as a for loop.

My function is:

function pad(str, max, padder) {
  padder = typeof padder === "undefined" ? "0" : padder;
  return str.toString().length < max ? pad(padder.toString() + str, max, padder) : str;
}

You can use my function with, or without, setting the padding variable. So like this:

pad(1, 3); // Returns '001'
// - Or -
pad(1, 3, "x"); // Returns 'xx1'

Personally, after my tests, I would use a method with a while loop, like Aleksandar Toplek or Vitim.us. However, I would modify it slightly so that you are able to set the padding string.

So, I would use this code:

function padLeft(str, len, pad) {
    pad = typeof pad === "undefined" ? "0" : pad + "";
    str = str + "";
    while(str.length < len) {
        str = pad + str;
    }
    return str;
}

// Usage
padLeft(1, 3); // Returns '001'
// - Or -
padLeft(1, 3, "x"); // Returns 'xx1'

You could also use it as a prototype function, by using this code:

Number.prototype.padLeft = function(len, pad) {
    pad = typeof pad === "undefined" ? "0" : pad + "";
    var str = this + "";
    while(str.length < len) {
        str = pad + str;
    }
    return str;
}

// Usage
var num = 1;

num.padLeft(3); // Returns '001'
// - Or -
num.padLeft(3, "x"); // Returns 'xx1'
  • I put this in a jsfiddle to make it quick for others to test, adding your version of the code: jsfiddle.net/kevinmicke/vnvghw7y/2 Your version is always very competitive, and sometimes the fastest. Thanks for the fairly exhaustive testing. – kevinmicke Oct 5 '15 at 19:17
6

ECMAScript 2017: use padStart or padEnd

'abc'.padStart(10);         // "       abc"
'abc'.padStart(10, "foo");  // "foofoofabc"
'abc'.padStart(6,"123465"); // "123abc"

More info:

  • Voted up because it works in my scenario and would be nice to have in the specs. (Although it doesn't really answer the question, as it is not about "0"s :-) ) – Xan-Kun Clark-Davis Jun 6 '17 at 9:28
5

In all modern browsers you can use

numberStr.padStart(numberLength, "0");

function zeroFill(num, numLength) {
  var numberStr = num.toString();

  return numberStr.padStart(numLength, "0");
}

var numbers = [0, 1, 12, 123, 1234, 12345];

numbers.forEach(
  function(num) {
    var numString = num.toString();
    
    var paddedNum = zeroFill(numString, 5);

    console.log(paddedNum);
  }
);

Here is the MDN reference https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/padStart

4

Not that this question needs more answers, but I thought I would add the simple lodash version of this.

_.padLeft(number, 6, '0')

  • 1
    Better: var zfill = _.partialRight(_.padStart, '0'); – Droogans Mar 14 '16 at 18:03
  • 3
    Some people will probably protest "I don't want to use lodash" but it's hardly a valid argument anymore since you can install only this function: npm install --save lodash.padleft, then import padLeft from 'lodash.padleft' and omit the _. – Andy Oct 14 '16 at 20:44
4

The latest way to do this is much simpler:

var number = 2
number.toLocaleString(undefined, {minimumIntegerDigits:2})

output: "02"

  • (8).toLocaleString(undefined, {minimumIntegerDigits: 5}) returns "00.008" for me, based on my locale. – le_m Mar 18 '17 at 21:58
4

Just an another solution, but I think it's more legible.

function zeroFill(text, size)
{
  while (text.length < size){
  	text = "0" + text;
  }
  
  return text;
}

  • Same as which other? – Fabio Turati Jul 22 '16 at 14:14
3

This one is less native, but may be the fastest...

zeroPad = function (num, count) {
    var pad = (num + '').length - count;
    while(--pad > -1) {
        num = '0' + num;
    }
    return num;
};
  • i think you want to do pad = count - (num + '').length. negative numbers aren't handled well, but apart from that, it's not bad. +1 – nickf Sep 6 '09 at 23:29
3

My solution

Number.prototype.PadLeft = function (length, digit) {
    var str = '' + this;
    while (str.length < length) {
        str = (digit || '0') + str;
    }
    return str;
};

Usage

var a = 567.25;
a.PadLeft(10); // 0000567.25

var b = 567.25;
b.PadLeft(20, '2'); // 22222222222222567.25
3

Why not use recursion?

function padZero(s, n) {
    s = s.toString(); // in case someone passes a number
    return s.length >= n ? s : padZero('0' + s, n);
}
  • padZero(223, 3) fails with '0223' – Serginho Oct 18 '16 at 10:55
  • Well, I assumed that this function is called with a string as the first parameter. However, I fixed it. – lex82 Oct 18 '16 at 12:12
  • I love recursions :-) – Xan-Kun Clark-Davis Jun 6 '17 at 9:33
2

Some monkeypatching also works

String.prototype.padLeft = function (n, c) {
  if (isNaN(n))
    return null;
  c = c || "0";
  return (new Array(n).join(c).substring(0, this.length-n)) + this; 
};
var paddedValue = "123".padLeft(6); // returns "000123"
var otherPadded = "TEXT".padLeft(8, " "); // returns "    TEXT"
  • 1
    -1 monkeypatching the toplevel namespacing in javascript is bad practice. – Jeremy Wall Sep 7 '09 at 0:37
  • 2
    True for Object and Array objects, but String is not bad – Rodrigo Sep 11 '09 at 16:56
2
function pad(toPad, padChar, length){
    return (String(toPad).length < length)
        ? new Array(length - String(toPad).length + 1).join(padChar) + String(toPad)
        : toPad;
}

pad(5, 0, 6) = 000005

pad('10', 0, 2) = 10 // don't pad if not necessary

pad('S', 'O', 2) = SO

...etc.

Cheers

  • This doesn't work. pad(100, '0', 4) => 000100 – drewish May 22 '12 at 20:23
  • I think it should be more like: var s = String(toPad); return (s.length < length) ? new Array(length - s.length + 1).join('0') + s : s; if you fix it I'll remove my down vote. – drewish May 22 '12 at 20:24
  • @drewish Thanks for catching that, I agree with your edit (except for the hardcoded 0 join char :) -- Answer updated. – Madbreaks May 22 '12 at 21:25
  • Ah yeah I'd hard coded it in my usage. – drewish May 23 '12 at 2:04
  • I think it'd be better to store the string into a temporary variable. I did some benchmarking of that here: jsperf.com/padding-with-memoization it's also got benchmarks for the use of the new in "new Array" the results for new are all over the place but memiozation seems like the way to go. – drewish May 23 '12 at 16:28
2

The simplest, most straight-forward solution you will find.

function zerofill(number,length) {
    var output = number.toString();
    while(output.length < length) {
      output = '0' + output;
    }
    return output;
}

protected by Ionică Bizău Dec 2 '14 at 18:19

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