18

Consider:

class Item:
   def __init__(self, a, b):
       self.a = a
       self.b = b

class Items:
    GREEN = Item('a', 'b')
    BLUE = Item('c', 'd')

Is there a way to adapt the ideas for simple enums to this case? (see this question) Ideally, as in Java, I would like to cram it all into one class.

Java model:

enum EnumWithAttrs {
    GREEN("a", "b"),
    BLUE("c", "d");

    EnumWithAttrs(String a, String b) {
      this.a = a;
      this.b = b;
    }

    private String a;
    private String b;

    /* accessors and other java noise */
}
  • 5
    What you are trying to do is not at all clear from the phrase "adapt the ideas for simple enums to this case". – kindall Oct 1 '12 at 19:54
  • 2
    Use a named tuple perhaps? But then again, no, it's better to use a class for that instead. – Martijn Pieters Oct 1 '12 at 19:56
17

Python 3.4 has a new Enum data type (which has been backported as enum34 and enhanced as aenum1). Both enum34 and aenum2 easily support your use case:

[aenum py2/3]

import aenum
class EnumWithAttrs(aenum.AutoNumberEnum):
    _init_ = 'a b'
    GREEN = 'a', 'b'
    BLUE = 'c', 'd'

[enum34 py2/3 or stdlib enum 3.4+]

import enum
class EnumWithAttrs(enum.Enum):

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwds):
        value = len(cls.__members__) + 1
        obj = object.__new__(cls)
        obj._value_ = value
        return obj

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

    GREEN = 'a', 'b'
    BLUE = 'c', 'd'

And in use:

--> EnumWithAttrs.BLUE
<EnumWithAttrs.BLUE: 1>

--> EnumWithAttrs.BLUE.a
'c'

1 Disclosure: I am the author of the Python stdlib Enum, the enum34 backport, and the Advanced Enumeration (aenum) library.

2 aenum also supports NamedConstants and metaclass-based NamedTuples.

| improve this answer | |
  • @andilabs: Sounds like you asking for something like mypy. mypy currently supports the stdlib Enum only. Someone could take the Enum support from mypy and translate that for aenum.Enum, but I have not had time. – Ethan Furman Dec 18 '19 at 17:43
  • Why EnumWithAttrs.BLUE.a returns "c" instead of "a"? I need to get the second value from tuple. – Alexei Marinichenko Aug 25 at 15:57
  • @AlexeiMarinichenko: In the example code above, a is the first attribute and b is the second; so to access the second attribute of BLUE you would do EnumWithAttrs.BLUE.b. – Ethan Furman Aug 26 at 22:05
12

For Python 3:

class Status(Enum):
    READY = "ready", "I'm ready to do whatever is needed"
    ERROR = "error", "Something went wrong here"

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwds):
        obj = object.__new__(cls)
        obj._value_ = args[0]
        return obj

    # ignore the first param since it's already set by __new__
    def __init__(self, _: str, description: str = None):
        self._description_ = description

    def __str__(self):
        return self.value

    # this makes sure that the description is read-only
    @property
    def description(self):
        return self._description_

And you can use it as a standard enum or factory by type:

print(Status.READY)
# ready
print(Status.READY.description)
# I'm ready to do whatever is needed
print(Status("ready")) # this does not create a new object
# ready
| improve this answer | |
10

Before Python 3.4 and the addition of the excellent enum module, a good choice would have been to use a namedtuple:

from collections import namedtuple

Item = namedtuple('abitem', ['a', 'b'])

class Items:
    GREEN = Item('a', 'b')
    BLUE = Item('c', 'd')

These days, any supported version of Python has enum, so please use that module. It gives you a lot more control over how each enum value is produced.

If you give each item a tuple of values, then these are passed to the __init__ method as separate (positional) arguments, which lets you set additional attributes on the enum value:

from enum import Enum

class Items(Enum):
    GREEN = ('a', 'b')
    BLUE = ('c', 'd')

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

This produces enum entries whose value is the tuple assigned to each name, as well as two attributes a and b:

>>> Items.GREEN, Items.BLUE
(<Items.GREEN: ('a', 'b')>, <Items.BLUE: ('c', 'd')>)
>>> Items.BLUE.a
'c'
>>> Items.BLUE.b
'd'
>>> Items(('a', 'b'))
<Items.GREEN: ('a', 'b')>

Note that you can look up each enum value by passing in the same tuple again.

If the first item should represent the value of each enum entry, use a __new__ method to set _value_:

from enum import Enum

class Items(Enum):
    GREEN = ('a', 'b')
    BLUE = ('c', 'd')

    def __new__(cls, a, b):
        entry = object.__new__(cls) 
        entry.a = entry._value_ = a  # set the value, and the extra attribute
        entry.b = b
        return entry

    def __repr__(self):
        return f'<{type(self).__name__}.{self.name}: ({self.a!r}, {self.b!r})>'

I added a custom __repr__ as well, the default only includes self._value_. Now the value of each entry is defined by the first item in the tuple, and can be used to look up the enum entry:

>>> Items.GREEN, Items.BLUE
(<Items.GREEN: ('a', 'b')>, <Items.BLUE: ('c', 'd')>)
>>> Items.BLUE.a
'c'
>>> Items.BLUE.b
'd'
>>> Items('a')
<Items.GREEN: ('a', 'b')>

See the section on __init__ vs. __new__ in the documentation for further options.

| improve this answer | |
  • @bmargulies Or some watching. In this video recording of a PyCon talk] Raymond Hettinger explains why named tuples are awesome, how they work and use cases for them. Fun with Python's Newer Tools [11:35 - 26:00]. The examples he demonstrates include an enum type for colors. – Lukas Graf Oct 1 '12 at 20:44
  • Doesn't allow me to chose an item from its name e.g. I expect Items('a') to return Items.GREEN – off99555 Oct 16 at 8:54
  • @off99555: this answer was posted long before the enum module was added, which is what you really want to use now. – Martijn Pieters Oct 16 at 9:10
  • @off99555: I've updated the answer to make use of enum now that that's a universally available option. Note that an Enum won't directly let you map arbitrary items from the tuple of options to an enum value; Items('b') or Items('d') still won't work, only the enum _value_ attribute is supported in lookups. You'd have to define a class method yourself that encodes custom lookup rules, e.g. @classmethod, def lookup(cls, value):, for entry in cls.__members__.values(): if value in {entry.a, entry.b}: return entry. – Martijn Pieters Oct 16 at 9:21
5

Here's another approach which I think is simpler than the others, but allows the most flexibility:

from collections import namedtuple
from enum import Enum

class Status(namedtuple('Status', 'name description'), Enum):
    READY = 'ready', 'I am ready to do whatever is needed'
    ERROR = 'error', 'Something went wrong here'

    def __str__(self) -> str:
        return self.name

Works as expected:

print(Status.READY)
print(repr(Status.READY))
print(Status.READY.description)
print(Status.READY.value)

prints:

ready
<Status.READY: Status(name='ready', description='I am ready to do whatever is needed')>
I am ready to do whatever is needed
Status(name='ready', description='I am ready to do whatever is needed')

You get the best of namedtuple and Enum.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is more descriptive and easy to use than the accepted answer. – Alexei Marinichenko Aug 25 at 16:05
  • 1
    It doesn't allow me to select the Status by name e.g. Status('ready'). It's needed when you want user to choose the status from a list of names, and they will type a name e.g. 'ready' – off99555 Oct 16 at 8:53

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