6

I used grep that outputs a list like this

/player/ABc12
/player/ABC321
/player/EGF987
/player/egf751

However I want to only give the name of the players such ABC321, EFG987, etc...

1
  • grep only shows you the lines that contain what you found. usually you'd use awk/sed to filter things so you only get the sub-parts of the line.
    – Marc B
    Oct 1 '12 at 23:56
15

Start using grep :

$ grep -oP "/player/\K.*" FILE
ABc12
ABC321
EGF987
egf751

Or shorter :

$ grep -oP "[^/]/\K.*" FILE
ABc12
ABC321
EGF987
egf751

Or without -P (pcre) option :

$ grep -o '[^/]\+$' FILE
ABc12
ABC321
EGF987
egf751

Or with pure bash :

$ IFS=/ oIFS=$IFS
$ while read a b c; do echo $c; done < FILE
ABc12
ABC321
EGF987
egf751
$ IFS=$oIFS
1
  • Added grep -oP shorter solution :) Oct 2 '12 at 0:56
9

@sputnick has the right idea with grep, and something like that would actually be my preferred solution. I personally immediately thought of a positive lookbehind:

grep -oP '(?<=/player/)\w+' file

But the \K works perfectly fine as well.

An alternative (somewhat shorter) solution is with sed:

sed 's:.*/::' file
1
  • 1
    the sed expression worked out better for me Oct 2 '12 at 2:12
4

Stop using grep.

$ awk -F/ '$2 == "player" { print $3 }' input.txt
ABc12
ABC321
EGF987
egf751
0

One way using GNU grep and a positive lookbehind:

grep -oP '(?<=^/player/).*' file.txt

Results:

ABc12
ABC321
EGF987
egf751

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