43

I'm writing an Android application that records audio every 10 minutes. I am using a Timer to do that. But what is the difference between schedule and scheduleAtFixedRate? Is there any performance benefit in using one over the other?

1
95

The difference is best explained by this non-Android documentation:

Fixed-rate timers (scheduleAtFixedRate()) are based on the starting time (so each iteration will execute at startTime + iterationNumber * delayTime).

In fixed-rate execution, each execution is scheduled relative to the scheduled execution time of the initial execution. If an execution is delayed for any reason (such as garbage collection or other background activity), two or more executions will occur in rapid succession to "catch up."

Fixed-delay timers (schedule()) are based on the previous execution (so each iteration will execute at lastExecutionTime + delayTime).

In fixed-delay execution, each execution is scheduled relative to the actual execution time of the previous execution. If an execution is delayed for any reason (such as garbage collection or other background activity), subsequent executions will be delayed as well.

Aside from this, there is no difference. You will not find a significance performance difference, either.

If you are using this in a case where you want to stay synchronized with something else, you'll want to use scheduleAtFixedRate(). The delay from schedule() can drift and introduce error.

1
  • 1
    Be aware that, when you change the system time to a time in the past (on android this needs root), the timer will NOT execute your tasks for that amount of time in both the described cases. – Nappy Apr 10 '15 at 9:36
19

A simple schedule() method will execute at once while scheduleAtFixedRate() method takes and extra parameter which is for repetition of the task again & again on specific time interval.

by looking at syntax :

Timer timer = new Timer(); 
timer.schedule( new performClass(), 30000 );

This is going to perform once after the 30 Second Time Period Interval is over. A kind of timeoput-action.

Timer timer = new Timer(); 
//timer.schedule(task, delay, period)
//timer.schedule( new performClass(), 1000, 30000 );
// or you can write in another way
//timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, delay, period);
timer.scheduleAtFixedRate( new performClass(), 1000, 30000 );

This is going to start after 1 second and will repeat on every 30 seconds time interval.

5
  • 5
    Actually, if you specify the 3rd argument, schedule() will repeat also. – Eric Oct 2 '12 at 4:45
  • 1
    You hadn't when I commented! Comment rescinded. ;) – Eric Oct 2 '12 at 4:50
  • nopes, i did it before you commented it, then i comment that part in my code and wrote another method scheduleAtFixRate(); – Lucifer Oct 2 '12 at 4:50
  • so are these two calls the same? timer.schedule( new performClass(), 0, 30000); and timer.scheduleAtFixedRate( new performClass(), 0, 30000); – DXM Oct 2 '12 at 19:59
  • why there is no control for period must be bigger than delay. for example what does it mean. (period is smaller than delay) github.com/daimajia/NumberProgressBar/blob/master/demo/src/main/… – mehmet Mar 29 '18 at 7:30
1

According to java.util.Timer.TimerImpl.TimerHeap code

// this is a repeating task,
if (task.fixedRate) {
    // task is scheduled at fixed rate
    task.when = task.when + task.period;
} else {
    // task is scheduled at fixed delay
    task.when = System.currentTimeMillis() + task.period;
}

--

java.util.Timer.schedule(TimerTask task, long delay, long period)

will set task.fixedRate = false;

java.util.Timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task, long delay, long period)

will set task.fixedRate = true;

btw Timer doesn't work when screen is off. You should use AlarmManager.

There is sample:http://developer.android.com/training/scheduling/alarms.html

-1

In case of schedule it only executes once when the appropriate times came. On the other hand scheduleAtFixedRate has an extra parameter period which contains amount of time in milliseconds between subsequent executions.

More info can be find here

http://developer.android.com/reference/java/util/Timer.html#schedule(java.util.TimerTask, long)

1
  • 1
    schedule() can also have that period argument specified. – Eric Oct 2 '12 at 4:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.