123

In R, I'd like to retrieve a list of global variables at the end of my script and iterate over them. Here is my code

#declare a few sample variables
a<-10
b<-"Hello world"
c<-data.frame()

#get all global variables in script and iterate over them
myGlobals<-objects()
for(i in myGlobals){
  print(typeof(i))     #prints 'character'
}

My problem is that typeof(i) always returns character even though variable a and c are not character variables. How can I get the original type of variable inside the for loop?

1
  • 1
    Note to people reading this question: typeof() gives a very generic piece of information about how the object is stored in memory. For most use cases, if you want to know good information about a variable x, you'll get more useful information from class(x), is(x), or str(x) (in order of how much detail they provide). See Eric's answer below for examples of what typeof() tells you: factors are integer; lists, data frames, model objects, other advanced objects are just list... – Gregor Thomas Jan 26 '18 at 14:59
116

You need to use get to obtain the value rather than the character name of the object as returned by ls:

x <- 1L
typeof(ls())
[1] "character"
typeof(get(ls()))
[1] "integer"

Alternatively, for the problem as presented you might want to use eapply:

eapply(.GlobalEnv,typeof)
$x
[1] "integer"

$a
[1] "double"

$b
[1] "character"

$c
[1] "list"
2
  • Get worked perfectly. Do you know if there is any performance penalty if get() is used to find the type of several large data frames which may be present in the variable list returned by objects()? – user1625066 Oct 2 '12 at 16:15
  • 1
    get has its critics and I would imagine eapply would be faster than an interpreted loop. But there is only one way to find out... – James Oct 2 '12 at 16:20
20

R/Rscript doesn't have concrete datatypes.

R interpreter has a duck-typing memory allocation system. There is no builtin method to tell you the datatype of your pointer to memory. Duck typing is done for speed, but turned out to be a bad idea because now statements such as: print(is.integer(5)) returns FALSE and is.integer(as.integer(5)) returns TRUE. Go figure.

The R-manual on basic types: https://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/R-lang.html#Basic-types

The best you can hope for is to write your own function to probe your pointer to memory, then use process of elimination to decide if it is suitable for your needs.

If your variable is a global or an object:

Your object() needs to be penetrated with get(...) before you can see inside. Example:

a <- 10
myGlobals <- objects()
for(i in myGlobals){
  typeof(i)         #prints character
  typeof(get(i))    #prints integer
}

typeof(...) probes your variable pointer to memory:

The R function typeof has a bias to give you the type at maximum depth, for example.

library(tibble)

#expression              notes                                  type
#----------------------- -------------------------------------- ----------
typeof(TRUE)             #a single boolean:                     logical
typeof(1L)               #a single numeric with L postfixed:    integer
typeof("foobar")         #A single string in double quotes:     character
typeof(1)                #a single numeric:                     double
typeof(list(5,6,7))      #a list of numeric:                    list
typeof(2i)               #an imaginary number                   complex

typeof(5 + 5L)           #double + integer is coerced:          double
typeof(c())              #an empty vector has no type:          NULL
typeof(!5)               #a bang before a double:               logical
typeof(Inf)              #infinity has a type:                  double
typeof(c(5,6,7))         #a vector containing only doubles:     double
typeof(c(c(TRUE)))       #a vector of vector of logicals:       logical
typeof(matrix(1:10))     #a matrix of doubles has a type:       list

typeof(substr("abc",2,2))#a string at index 2 which is 'b' is:  character
typeof(c(5L,6L,7L))      #a vector containing only integers:    integer
typeof(c(NA,NA,NA))      #a vector containing only NA:          logical
typeof(data.frame())     #a data.frame with nothing in it:      list
typeof(data.frame(c(3))) #a data.frame with a double in it:     list
typeof(c("foobar"))      #a vector containing only strings:     character
typeof(pi)               #builtin expression for pi:            double

typeof(1.66)             #a single numeric with mantissa:       double
typeof(1.66L)            #a double with L postfixed             double
typeof(c("foobar"))      #a vector containing only strings:     character
typeof(c(5L, 6L))        #a vector containing only integers:    integer
typeof(c(1.5, 2.5))      #a vector containing only doubles:     double
typeof(c(1.5, 2.5))      #a vector containing only doubles:     double
typeof(c(TRUE, FALSE))   #a vector containing only logicals:    logical

typeof(factor())         #an empty factor has default type:     integer
typeof(factor(3.14))     #a factor containing doubles:          integer
typeof(factor(T, F))     #a factor containing logicals:         integer
typeof(Sys.Date())       #builtin R dates:                      double
typeof(hms::hms(3600))   #hour minute second timestamp          double
typeof(c(T, F))          #T and F are builtins:                 logical
typeof(1:10)             #a builtin sequence of numerics:       integer
typeof(NA)               #The builtin value not available:      logical

typeof(c(list(T)))       #a vector of lists of logical:         list
typeof(list(c(T)))       #a list of vectors of logical:         list
typeof(c(T, 3.14))       #a vector of logicals and doubles:     double
typeof(c(3.14, "foo"))   #a vector of doubles and characters:   character
typeof(c("foo",list(T))) #a vector of strings and lists:        list
typeof(list("foo",c(T))) #a list of strings and vectors:        list
typeof(TRUE + 5L)        #a logical plus an integer:            integer
typeof(c(TRUE, 5L)[1])   #The true is coerced to 1              integer
typeof(c(c(2i), TRUE)[1])#logical coerced to complex:           complex
typeof(c(NaN, 'batman')) #NaN's in a vector don't dominate:     character
typeof(5 && 4)           #doubles are coerced by order of &&    logical
typeof(8 < 'foobar')     #string and double is coerced          logical
typeof(list(4, T)[[1]])  #a list retains type at every index:   double
typeof(list(4, T)[[2]])  #a list retains type at every index:   logical
typeof(2 ** 5)           #result of exponentiation              double
typeof(0E0)              #exponential lol notation              double
typeof(0x3fade)          #hexidecimal                           double
typeof(paste(3, '3'))    #paste promotes types to string        character
typeof(3 + 四)           #R pukes on unicode                    error
typeof(iconv("a", "latin1", "UTF-8")) #UTF-8 characters         character
typeof(5 == 5)           #result of a comparison:               logical

class(...) probes your variable pointer to memory:

The R function class has a bias to give you the type of container or structure encapsulating your types, for example.

library(tibble)

#expression            notes                                    class
#--------------------- ---------------------------------------- ---------
class(matrix(1:10))     #a matrix of doubles has a class:       matrix
class(factor("hi"))     #factor of items is:                    factor
class(TRUE)             #a single boolean:                      logical
class(1L)               #a single numeric with L postfixed:     integer
class("foobar")         #A single string in double quotes:      character
class(1)                #a single numeric:                      numeric
class(list(5,6,7))      #a list of numeric:                     list
class(2i)               #an imaginary                           complex
class(data.frame())     #a data.frame with nothing in it:       data.frame
class(Sys.Date())       #builtin R dates:                       Date
class(sapply)           #a function is                          function
class(charToRaw("hi"))  #convert string to raw:                 raw
class(array("hi"))      #array of items is:                     array

class(5 + 5L)           #double + integer is coerced:          numeric
class(c())              #an empty vector has no class:         NULL
class(!5)               #a bang before a double:               logical
class(Inf)              #infinity has a class:                 numeric
class(c(5,6,7))         #a vector containing only doubles:     numeric
class(c(c(TRUE)))       #a vector of vector of logicals:       logical

class(substr("abc",2,2))#a string at index 2 which is 'b' is:  character
class(c(5L,6L,7L))      #a vector containing only integers:    integer
class(c(NA,NA,NA))      #a vector containing only NA:          logical
class(data.frame(c(3))) #a data.frame with a double in it:     data.frame
class(c("foobar"))      #a vector containing only strings:     character
class(pi)               #builtin expression for pi:            numeric

class(1.66)             #a single numeric with mantissa:       numeric
class(1.66L)            #a double with L postfixed             numeric
class(c("foobar"))      #a vector containing only strings:     character
class(c(5L, 6L))        #a vector containing only integers:    integer
class(c(1.5, 2.5))      #a vector containing only doubles:     numeric
class(c(TRUE, FALSE))   #a vector containing only logicals:    logical

class(factor())       #an empty factor has default class:      factor
class(factor(3.14))   #a factor containing doubles:            factor
class(factor(T, F))   #a factor containing logicals:           factor
class(hms::hms(3600)) #hour minute second timestamp            hms difftime
class(c(T, F))        #T and F are builtins:                   logical
class(1:10)           #a builtin sequence of numerics:         integer
class(NA)             #The builtin value not available:        logical

class(c(list(T)))       #a vector of lists of logical:         list
class(list(c(T)))       #a list of vectors of logical:         list
class(c(T, 3.14))       #a vector of logicals and doubles:     numeric
class(c(3.14, "foo"))   #a vector of doubles and characters:   character
class(c("foo",list(T))) #a vector of strings and lists:        list
class(list("foo",c(T))) #a list of strings and vectors:        list
class(TRUE + 5L)        #a logical plus an integer:            integer
class(c(TRUE, 5L)[1])   #The true is coerced to 1              integer
class(c(c(2i), TRUE)[1])#logical coerced to complex:           complex
class(c(NaN, 'batman')) #NaN's in a vector don't dominate:     character
class(5 && 4)           #doubles are coerced by order of &&    logical
class(8 < 'foobar')     #string and double is coerced          logical
class(list(4, T)[[1]])  #a list retains class at every index:  numeric
class(list(4, T)[[2]])  #a list retains class at every index:  logical
class(2 ** 5)           #result of exponentiation              numeric
class(0E0)              #exponential lol notation              numeric
class(0x3fade)          #hexidecimal                           numeric
class(paste(3, '3'))     #paste promotes class to string       character
class(3 + 四)           #R pukes on unicode                   error
class(iconv("a", "latin1", "UTF-8")) #UTF-8 characters         character
class(5 == 5)           #result of a comparison:               logical

Get the data storage.mode of your variable:

When an R variable is written to disk, the data layout changes again, and is called the data's storage.mode. The function storage.mode(...) reveals this low level information: see Mode, Class, and Type of R objects. You shouldn't need to worry about R's storage.mode unless you are trying to understand delays caused by round trip casts/coercions that occur when assigning and reading data to and from disk.

Demo: R/Rscript gettype(your_variable):

Run this R code then adapt it for your purposes, it'll make a pretty good guess as to what type it is.

get_type <- function(variable){ 
  sz <- as.integer(length(variable)) #length of your variable 
  tof <- typeof(variable)            #typeof your variable 
  cls <- class(variable)             #class of your variable 
  isc <- is.character(variable)      #what is.character() has to say about it.  
  d <- dim(variable)                 #dimensions of your variable 
  isv <- is.vector(variable) 
  if (is.matrix(variable)){  
    d <- dim(t(variable))             #dimensions of your matrix
  }    
  #observations ----> datatype 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "logical" && cls == "logical" && isv == TRUE){ return("vector of logical") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "integer" && cls == "integer" ){ return("vector of integer") } 
  if (sz==1 && tof == "double"  && cls == "Date" ){ return("Date") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "raw"     && cls == "raw" ){ return("vector of raw") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "double"  && cls == "numeric" ){ return("vector of double") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "double"  && cls == "array" ){ return("vector of array of double") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "character"  && cls == "array" ){ return("vector of array of character") } 
  if (sz>=0 && tof == "list"       && cls == "data.frame" ){ return("data.frame") } 
  if (sz>=1 && isc == TRUE         && isv == TRUE){ return("vector of character") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "complex"    && cls == "complex" ){ return("vector of complex") } 
  if (sz==0 && tof == "NULL"       && cls == "NULL" ){ return("NULL") } 
  if (sz>=0 && tof == "integer"    && cls == "factor" ){ return("factor") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "double"     && cls == "numeric" && isv == TRUE){ return("vector of double") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "double"     && cls == "matrix"){ return("matrix of double") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "character"  && cls == "matrix"){ return("matrix of character") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "list"       && cls == "list" && isv == TRUE){ return("vector of list") } 
  if (sz>=1 && tof == "closure"    && cls == "function" && isv == FALSE){ return("closure/function") } 
  return("it's pointer to memory, bruh") 
} 
assert <- function(a, b){ 
  if (a == b){ 
    cat("P") 
  } 
  else{ 
    cat("\nFAIL!!!  Sniff test:\n") 
    sz <- as.integer(length(variable))   #length of your variable 
    tof <- typeof(variable)              #typeof your variable 
    cls <- class(variable)               #class of your variable 
    isc <- is.character(variable)        #what is.character() has to say about it. 
    d <- dim(variable)                   #dimensions of your variable 
    isv <- is.vector(variable) 
    if (is.matrix(variable)){  
      d <- dim(t(variable))                   #dimensions of your variable 
    } 
    if (!is.function(variable)){ 
      print(paste("value: '", variable, "'")) 
    } 
    print(paste("get_type said: '", a, "'")) 
    print(paste("supposed to be: '", b, "'")) 
 
    cat("\nYour pointer to memory has properties:\n")  
    print(paste("sz: '", sz, "'")) 
    print(paste("tof: '", tof, "'")) 
    print(paste("cls: '", cls, "'")) 
    print(paste("d: '", d, "'")) 
    print(paste("isc: '", isc, "'")) 
    print(paste("isv: '", isv, "'")) 
    quit() 
  } 
}
#these asserts give a sample for exercising the code. 
assert(get_type(TRUE),      "vector of logical")  #everything is a vector in R by default. 
assert(get_type(c(TRUE)),   "vector of logical")  #c() just casts to vector 
assert(get_type(c(c(TRUE))),"vector of logical")  #casting vector multiple times does nothing 
assert(get_type(!5),        "vector of logical")  #bang inflicts 'not truth-like' 
assert(get_type(1L),              "vector of integer")   #naked integers are still vectors of 1 
assert(get_type(c(1L, 2L)),       "vector of integer")   #Longs are not doubles 
assert(get_type(c(1L, c(2L, 3L))),"vector of integer")   #nested vectors of integers 
assert(get_type(c(1L, c(TRUE))),  "vector of integer")   #logicals coerced to integer 
assert(get_type(c(FALSE, c(1L))), "vector of integer")   #logicals coerced to integer 
assert(get_type("foobar"),        "vector of character")    #character here means 'string' 
assert(get_type(c(1L, "foobar")), "vector of character")    #integers are coerced to string 
assert(get_type(5),           "vector of double") 
assert(get_type(5 + 5L),      "vector of double") 
assert(get_type(Inf),         "vector of double") 
assert(get_type(c(5,6,7)),    "vector of double") 
assert(get_type(NaN),           "vector of double") 
assert(get_type(list(5)),       "vector of list")    #your list is in a vector. 
assert(get_type(list(5,6,7)),   "vector of list") 
assert(get_type(c(list(5,6,7))),"vector of list") 
assert(get_type(list(c(5,6),T)),"vector of list")    #vector of list of vector and logical 
assert(get_type(list(5,6,7)),   "vector of list") 
assert(get_type(2i),            "vector of complex") 
assert(get_type(c(2i, 3i, 4i)), "vector of complex") 
assert(get_type(c()),            "NULL") 
assert(get_type(data.frame()),   "data.frame") 
assert(get_type(data.frame(4,5)),"data.frame") 
assert(get_type(Sys.Date()),     "Date") 
assert(get_type(sapply),         "closure/function") 
assert(get_type(charToRaw("hi")),"vector of raw") 
assert(get_type(c(charToRaw("a"), charToRaw("b"))), "vector of raw") 
assert(get_type(array(4)),       "vector of array of double") 
assert(get_type(array(4,5)),     "vector of array of double") 
assert(get_type(array("hi")),    "vector of array of character") 
assert(get_type(factor()),       "factor") 
assert(get_type(factor(3.14)),   "factor") 
assert(get_type(factor(TRUE)),   "factor") 
assert(get_type(matrix(3,4,5)),  "matrix of double") 
assert(get_type(as.matrix(5)),   "matrix of double") 
assert(get_type(matrix("yatta")),"matrix of character") 

I put in a C++/Java/Python ideology here that gives me the scoop of what the memory most looks like. R triad typing system is like trying to nail spaghetti to the wall, <- and <<- will package your matrix to a list when you least suspect. As the old duck-typing saying goes: If it waddles like a duck and if it quacks like a duck and if it has feathers, then it's a duck.

1
  • 1
    how to identify for example ds <- c(3,4,5,5,3) - that "ds" is exactly vector with contain numeric type ? – Max Usanin Sep 26 '17 at 9:27
6

You can use class(x) to check the variable type. If requirement is to check all variables type of a data frame then sapply(x, class) can be used.

5
> mtcars %>% 
+     summarise_all(typeof) %>% 
+     gather
    key  value
1   mpg double
2   cyl double
3  disp double
4    hp double
5  drat double
6    wt double
7  qsec double
8    vs double
9    am double
10 gear double
11 carb double

I try class and typeof functions, but all fails.

1

Designed to do essentially the inverse of what you wanted, here's one of my toolkit toys:

 lstype<-function(type='closure'){
inlist<-ls(.GlobalEnv)
if (type=='function') type <-'closure'
typelist<-sapply(sapply(inlist,get),typeof)
return(names(typelist[typelist==type]))
}
0

lapply(your_dataframe, class) gives you something like:

$tikr [1] "factor"

$Date [1] "Date"

$Open [1] "numeric"

$High [1] "numeric"

... etc.

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