57

If I'm passing an object to a case statement, and there is a case where it is undefined, can I handle that case? If so then how? If its not possible, then what is the best practice for handling an undefined case for a switch?

6
  • 2
    Why wouldn't default work in this case?
    – jcolebrand
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:27
  • I actually never heard of MDN. Thanks for that. It will be useful for future JS questions.
    – egucciar
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:34
  • I have, I just didnt think it would work with an "undeclared" value, and I wanted to see if anyone here would know. But apparently, undefined has 2 different meanings in the JS world, one which works in a case statement, and one which breaks it at runtime. Not so intuitive..
    – egucciar
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:40
  • Is there a more "functional" version of a switch statement?
    – egucciar
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:43
  • 1
    no, there's typeof var == 'undefined' and var === undefined and var == undefined, all of which have explicit meanings.
    – jcolebrand
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:43

4 Answers 4

74

Add a case for undefined.

case undefined:
  // code
  break;

Or, if all other options are exhausted, use the default.

default:
  // code
  break;

Note: To avoid errors, the variable supplied to switch has to be declared but can have an undefined value. Reference this fiddle and read more about defined and undefined variables in JavaScript.

10
  • I think this answers my question. I just was not entirely sure if undefined would cause unexpected behavoir in a switch statement. Thanks!
    – egucciar
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:30
  • Your last updated confuses me. What if it is undefined, and it is not defined anywhere? I just tested out the code and yeah, it breaks at runtime due to the argument being undefined.
    – egucciar
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:33
  • Again, the variable has to be declared, i.e. var myvar. Otherwise, you'll get an error. Oct 2, 2012 at 18:34
  • @user1274649: You should be declaring variables before you use them. Are these global variables you're testing? Oct 2, 2012 at 18:34
  • 3
    You know undefined can be assigned a value right? I mean it is javascript after all ;-)
    – PeeHaa
    Oct 2, 2012 at 18:38
3

Well, the most portable way would be to define a new variable undefined in your closure, that way you can completely avoid the case when someone does undefined = 1; somewhere in the code base (as a global var), which would completely bork most of the implementations here.

(function() {
    var foo;
    var undefined;

    switch (foo) {
        case 1:
            //something
            break;
        case 2:
            //something
            break;
        case undefined:
            // Something else!
            break;
        default:
            // Default condition
    }
})();

By explicitly declaring the variable, you prevent integration issues where you depend upon the global state of the undefined variable...

1
  • 2
    Downvoter: any comment as to the rationale for the downvote? Can this answer be improved? Is there a fundamental issue that you disagree with? Something worth discussing at least?
    – ircmaxell
    Oct 2, 2012 at 21:23
2

If you're comparing object references, but the variable may not be assigned a value, it'll work like any other case to simply use undefined.

var obs = [
    {},
    {}
];

var ob = obs[~~(Math.random() * (obs.length + 1))];

switch(ob) {
    case obs[0]: 
        alert(0); 
        break;
    case obs[1]:
        alert(1); 
        break;
    case undefined: 
        alert("Undefined"); 
        break;
    default: alert("some unknown value");
}
1
  • 1
    Thansk @jcolebrand. I didn't consider that I had excluded 0. Oct 2, 2012 at 18:42
0

Since undefined really is just another value ('undefined' in window === true), you can check for that.

var foo;

switch( foo ) {
    case 1:
        console.log('1');
        break;
    case 2:
        console.log('2');
        break;
    case 3:
        console.log('3');
        break;
    case undefined:
        console.log('undefined');
        break;
}

works just about right.

0

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