607

Has anybody done constructor overloading in TypeScript. On page 64 of the language specification (v 0.8), there are statements describing constructor overloads, but there wasn't any sample code given.

I'm trying out a really basic class declaration right now; it looks like this,

interface IBox {    
    x : number;
    y : number;
    height : number;
    width : number;
}

class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public height: number;
    public width: number;

    constructor(obj: IBox) {    
        this.x = obj.x;
        this.y = obj.y;
        this.height = obj.height;
        this.width = obj.width;
    }   

    constructor() {
        this.x = 0;
        this.y = 0;
        this.width = 0;
        this.height = 0;
    }
}

When ran with tsc BoxSample.ts, it throws out a duplicate constructor definition -- which is obvious. Any help is appreciated.

3
  • 8
    as far as I can tell, it doesnt support multiple constructors yet
    – Johan
    Commented Oct 3, 2012 at 6:09
  • 2
    still doesn't support multiple constructors. Just tried :( Commented Oct 11, 2019 at 6:46
  • Check this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/58788876/2746447, declare class fields only one time
    – egor.xyz
    Commented Dec 17, 2019 at 9:37

18 Answers 18

446

TypeScript allows you to declare overloads but you can only have one implementation and that implementation must have a signature that is compatible with all overloads. In your example, this can easily be done with an optional parameter as in,

interface IBox {    
    x: number;
    y: number;
    height: number;
    width: number;
}
    
class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public height: number;
    public width: number;

    constructor(obj?: IBox) {    
        this.x = obj?.x ?? 0;
        this.y = obj?.y ?? 0;
        this.height = obj?.height ?? 0;
        this.width = obj?.width ?? 0;
    }   
}

or two overloads with a more general constructor as in,

interface IBox {    
    x: number;
    y: number;
    height: number;
    width: number;
}
    
class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public height: number;
    public width: number;

    constructor();
    constructor(obj: IBox); 
    constructor(obj?: IBox) {    
        this.x = obj?.x ?? 0;
        this.y = obj?.y ?? 0;
        this.height = obj?.height ?? 0;
        this.width = obj?.width ?? 0;
    }   
}

See in Playground

8
  • 24
    Actually, it should be possible to let the compiler generate javascript to determine at run-time which overload was taken. But this is unlikely because their philosophy seems te be to generate as little javascript as possible.
    – remcoder
    Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 20:58
  • @remcoder, that would always be true. Some kinds of type information are not available at runtime. For example, there is no concept of the interface IBox in the generated JavaScript. It could work for classes and built in types, but I suppose given the potential confusion around this it was omitted. Commented Feb 27, 2014 at 11:27
  • 3
    Another very important note: while TypeScript is already not typesafe, this further invades it. Function overloading like done here loses any properties that can be checked about the function. The compiler won't care anymore and will assume the returned types to be correct. Commented Aug 6, 2014 at 8:19
  • 3
    What makes this not type safe? We're still ensuring that the type is number with public x: number. The safety comes in that we're making sure that parameters, if passed, are of a correct type.
    – nikk wong
    Commented Apr 19, 2016 at 5:53
  • @nikkwong froginvasion's point was that using this technique TypeScript doesn't verify the correctness of the overloaded implementation with respect to the overloads. The call sites are verified but the implementation is not. Though not "typesafe", using froginvasion's implied definition, it does limit the code that can be blamed for type errors to the overloaded implementation.
    – chuckj
    Commented Apr 20, 2016 at 23:06
228

Regarding constructor overloads one good alternative would be to implement the additional overloads as static factory methods. I think its more readable and easier than checking for all possible argument combinations at the constructor.

In the following example we're able to create a patient object using data from an insurance provider which stores values differently. To support yet another data structure for patient instantiation, one could simply add another static method to call the default constructor the best it can after normalizing the data provided.

class Patient {
    static fromInsurance({
        first, middle = '', last,
        birthday, gender
    }: InsuranceCustomer): Patient {
        return new this(
            `${last}, ${first} ${middle}`.trim(),
            utils.age(birthday),
            gender
        );
    }

    constructor(
        public name: string,
        public age: number,
        public gender?: string
    ) {}
}

interface InsuranceCustomer {
    first: string,
    middle?: string,
    last: string,
    birthday: string,
    gender: 'M' | 'F'
}


const utils = { /* included in the playground link below */};

{// Two ways of creating a Patient instance
    const
        jane = new Patient('Doe, Jane', 21),
        alsoJane = Patient.fromInsurance({ 
            first: 'Jane', last: 'Doe',
            birthday: 'Jan 1, 2000', gender: 'F'
        })

    console.clear()
    console.log(jane)
    console.log(alsoJane)
}

You can check the output at TS Playground


Method overloading in TypeScript isn't for real, let's say, as it would require too much compiler-generated code and TS is designed to avoid that at all costs. The main use case for method overloading is probably writing declarations for libraries that have magic arguments in their API. Since all the heavy-lifting of handling different sets of possible arguments is done by you I don't see much advantage in using overloads rather than ad-hoc methods for each scenario.

5
  • 9
    you could use (data: Partial<PersonData>) if you don't always want to require first, last, and birthday to be present in data.
    – Cabrera
    Commented Mar 16, 2019 at 17:10
  • 4
    Also, the access modifier of the constructor can be changed from public to private/protected, and then the only way to create an object is static factory methods. Sometimes this can be very useful. Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 10:10
  • One of the main differences is that child static methods must be subtypes of the parent static method, whereas there's no restriction on child constructors at all. Commented May 7, 2022 at 4:04
  • Great answer! tx. Particularly useful in any situation where the constructor's arguments don't match those of the additional method you want to make. Commented May 17, 2022 at 22:55
  • +10 for perseverance
    – JΛYDΞV
    Commented Oct 27, 2022 at 20:41
107

It sounds like you want the object parameter to be optional, and also each of the properties in the object to be optional. In the example, as provided, overload syntax isn't needed. I wanted to point out some bad practices in some of the answers here. Granted, it's not the smallest possible expression of essentially writing box = { x: 0, y: 87, width: 4, height: 0 }, but this provides all the code hinting niceties you could possibly want from the class as described. This example allows you to call a function with one, some, all, or none of the parameters and still get default values.

 /** @class */
 class Box {
     public x?: number;
     public y?: number;
     public height?: number;
     public width?: number;   

     // The Box class can work double-duty as the interface here since 
     // they are identical.  If you choose to add methods or modify this class, 
     // you will need to define and reference a new interface 
     // for the incoming parameters object 
     // e.g.:  `constructor(params: BoxObjI = {} as BoxObjI)` 
     constructor(params: Box = {} as Box) {

         // Define the properties of the incoming `params` object here. 
         // Setting a default value with the `= 0` syntax is optional for each parameter
         const {
             x = 0,
             y = 0,
             height = 1,
             width = 1
         } = params;
         
         //  If needed, make the parameters publicly accessible
         //  on the class ex.: 'this.var = var'.
         /**  Use jsdoc comments here for inline ide auto-documentation */
         this.x = x;
         this.y = y;
         this.height = height;
         this.width = width;
     }
 }

Need to add methods? A verbose but more extendable alternative: The Box class above can work double-duty as the interface since they are identical. If you choose to modify the above class, you will need to define and reference a new interface for the incoming parameters object since the Box class no longer would look exactly like the incoming parameters. Notice where the question marks (?:) denoting optional properties move in this case. Since we're setting default values within the class, they are guaranteed to be present, yet they are optional within the incoming parameters object:

    interface BoxParams {
        x?: number;
         // Add Parameters ...
    }

    class Box {
         public x: number;
         // Copy Parameters ...
         constructor(params: BoxParams = {} as BoxParams) {
         let { x = 0 } = params;
         this.x = x;
    }
    doSomething = () => {
        return this.x + this.x;
        }
    }

Whichever way you choose to define your class, this technique offers the guardrails of type safety, yet the flexibility write any of these:

const box1 = new Box();
const box2 = new Box({});
const box3 = new Box({x: 0});
const box4 = new Box({x: 0, height: 10});
const box5 = new Box({x: 0, y: 87, width: 4, height: 0});

 // Correctly reports error in TypeScript, and in js, box6.z is undefined
const box6 = new Box({z: 0});  

Compiled, you see how the default settings are only used if an optional value is undefined; it avoids the pitfalls of a widely used (but error-prone) fallback syntax of var = isOptional || default; by checking against void 0, which is shorthand for undefined:

The Compiled Output

var Box = (function () {
    function Box(params) {
        if (params === void 0) { params = {}; }
        var _a = params.x, x = _a === void 0 ? 0 : _a, _b = params.y, y = _b === void 0 ? 0 : _b, _c = params.height, height = _c === void 0 ? 1 : _c, _d = params.width, width = _d === void 0 ? 1 : _d;
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.height = height;
        this.width = width;
    }
    return Box;
}());

Addendum: Setting default values: the wrong way

The || (or) operator

Consider the danger of ||/or operators when setting default fallback values as shown in some other answers. This code below illustrates the wrong way to set defaults. You can get unexpected results when evaluating against falsey values like 0, '', null, undefined, false, NaN:

var myDesiredValue = 0;
var result = myDesiredValue || 2;

// This test will correctly report a problem with this setup.
console.assert(myDesiredValue === result && result === 0, 'Result should equal myDesiredValue. ' + myDesiredValue + ' does not equal ' + result);

Object.assign(this,params)

In my tests, using es6/typescript destructured object can be 15-90% faster than Object.assign. Using a destructured parameter only allows methods and properties you've assigned to the object. For example, consider this method:

class BoxTest {
    public x?: number = 1;

    constructor(params: BoxTest = {} as BoxTest) {
        Object.assign(this, params);
    }
}

If another user wasn't using TypeScript and attempted to place a parameter that didn't belong, say, they might try putting a z property

var box = new BoxTest({x: 0, y: 87, width: 4, height: 0, z: 7});

// This test will correctly report an error with this setup. `z` was defined even though `z` is not an allowed property of params.
console.assert(typeof box.z === 'undefined')
18
  • I know this is kind of an old thread but the Ibox casting broke my mind, can you explain it to me how it works?
    – Nickso
    Commented Apr 11, 2017 at 18:42
  • 2
    I've updated my answer to remove the superfluous casting that was a carryover from coding for Typescript 1.8. The casting that remains is for the empty object ( {} becomes the default object if no parameters are defined; and since {} doesn't validate as a Box, we cast it as a Box. Casting it this way allow us to create a new Box with none of its parameters defined. In your IDE, you can input my example, as well as the const box1 = new Box(); lines, and you can see how casting solves some of the error messages we see in the usage scenarios.
    – Benson
    Commented Apr 13, 2017 at 8:02
  • @Benson the BoxTest example contains errors. The TypeScript compiler correctly complains about the wrong usage of the constructor, but the assignment will still occur. The assertion fails because box.z is in fact 7 in your code, not undefined. Commented Apr 13, 2017 at 9:58
  • 1
    Added a method to the Box class and then the constructor stop working (failed at compile time). Any idea? Commented Dec 13, 2017 at 7:45
  • 1
    @JeeShenLee you could either extend the Box class to a newly-named class with methods or create an interface for the parameters expected. The interface type is borrowed from the Box class since classes can act as interfaces. With your added method, the interface was expecting a method to be passed in as part of the object since the class is doing double-duty as the interface. Just copy the first five lines of the Box class and change it to an interface with a new name, such as interface BoxConfig { x?: number ...} and then change the line constructor(obj: BoxConfig = {} as BoxConfig) {
    – Benson
    Commented Jan 6, 2018 at 12:34
82

Note that you can also work around the lack of overloading at the implementation level through default parameters in TypeScript, e.g.:

interface IBox {    
    x : number;
    y : number;
    height : number;
    width : number;
}

class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public height: number;
    public width: number;

    constructor(obj : IBox = {x:0,y:0, height:0, width:0}) {    
        this.x = obj.x;
        this.y = obj.y;
        this.height = obj.height;
        this.width = obj.width;
    }   
}

Edit: As of Dec 5 '16, see Benson's answer for a more elaborate solution that allows more flexibility.

1
  • What about interface IBox extends Box?
    – Ahmad
    Commented Feb 25, 2020 at 13:25
52

Update 2 (28 September 2020): This language is constantly evolving, and so if you can use Partial (introduced in v2.1) then this is now my preferred way to achieve this.

class Box {
   x: number;
   y: number;
   height: number;
   width: number;

   public constructor(b: Partial<Box> = {}) {
      Object.assign(this, b);
   }
}

// Example use
const a = new Box();
const b = new Box({x: 10, height: 99});
const c = new Box({foo: 10});          // Will fail to compile

Update (8 June 2017): guyarad and snolflake make valid points in their comments below to my answer. I would recommend readers look at the answers by Benson, Joe and snolflake who have better answers than mine.*

Original Answer (27 January 2014)

Another example of how to achieve constructor overloading:

class DateHour {

  private date: Date;
  private relativeHour: number;

  constructor(year: number, month: number, day: number, relativeHour: number);
  constructor(date: Date, relativeHour: number);
  constructor(dateOrYear: any, monthOrRelativeHour: number, day?: number, relativeHour?: number) {
    if (typeof dateOrYear === "number") {
      this.date = new Date(dateOrYear, monthOrRelativeHour, day);
      this.relativeHour = relativeHour;
    } else {
      var date = <Date> dateOrYear;
      this.date = new Date(date.getFullYear(), date.getMonth(), date.getDate());
      this.relativeHour = monthOrRelativeHour;
    }
  }
}

Source: http://mimosite.com/blog/post/2013/04/08/Overloading-in-TypeScript

4
  • 24
    This isn't a constructive comment - but, wow, this is ugly. Kind of misses the point of type safety in TypeScript...
    – Guy
    Commented Mar 1, 2015 at 10:04
  • 2
    Is that a constructor overload?! No thanks! I'd rather implement a static factory method for that class, really ugly indeed. Commented Jul 31, 2016 at 20:32
  • 2
    I suppose today we could have dateOrYear: Date | number, Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 17:18
  • I think it's a very good way to have something like the object initializer in c#. Ok, you open the door having a problem in some situations but it's not all objects that should have guards to prevent bad initialization. POCO or DTO as example are good candidates for this implementation. I would also put the parameter nullable to allow an empty constructor like this: args?: Partial<T>
    – Samuel
    Commented Jun 23, 2021 at 10:36
34

I know this is an old question, but new in 1.4 is union types; use these for all function overloads (including constructors). Example:

class foo {
    private _name: any;
    constructor(name: string | number) {
        this._name = name;
    }
}
var f1 = new foo("bar");
var f2 = new foo(1);
2
  • Wouldn't the name field also be of type string | number instead of any? Commented Apr 4, 2016 at 15:47
  • You could definitely do that, yes, and it might be a bit more consistent, but in this example, it'd only give you access to .toString() and .valueOf(), in Intellisense, so for me, using any is just fine, but to each his/her own.
    – Joe
    Commented Apr 5, 2016 at 13:20
18

Actually it might be too late for this answer but you can now do this:

class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public height: number;
    public width: number;

    constructor();
    constructor(obj: IBox);
    constructor(obj?: IBox) {    
        this.x = !obj ? 0 : obj.x;
        this.y = !obj ? 0 : obj.y;
        this.height = !obj ? 0 : obj.height;
        this.width = !obj ? 0 : obj.width;
    }
}

so instead of static methods you can do the above. I hope it will help you!!!

2
  • Great! You have to consider here, that every new extra field of other constructors should be marked as optional; like you already did for obj?
    – Radu Linu
    Commented Mar 4, 2020 at 8:37
  • 1
    Isn't the second constructor constructor(obj: IBox); redundant? Isn't the last one taking care of these both cases?
    – zaplec
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 11:45
9

You can handle this by :

class Box {
  x: number;
  y: number;
  height: number;
  width: number;
  constructor(obj?: Partial<Box>) {    
     assign(this, obj);
  }
}

Partial will make your fields (x,y, height, width) optionals, allowing multiple constructors

eg: you can do new Box({x,y}) without height, and width.

6
  • 2
    I think you still need to handle default values for missing items. Easily done, tho. Commented Oct 9, 2019 at 1:09
  • 1
    or constructor(obj?: Partial<Box>) +1 Commented May 17, 2020 at 12:12
  • 1
    Partials are a great answer, but why introduce lowdash? Commented Sep 28, 2020 at 10:11
  • @vegemite4me you're right no need for lodash. Object.assign is sufficient
    – spielbug
    Commented Nov 5, 2020 at 9:06
  • 1
    Careful, this solution breaks the class contract as Box defines that all properties are mandatory, while this solution allows them to be undefined.
    – DarkNeuron
    Commented Nov 26, 2020 at 14:38
7

Your Box class is attempting to define multiple constructor implementations.

Only the last constructor overload signature is used as the class constructor implementation.

In the below example, note the constructor implementation is defined such that it does not contradict either of the preceding overload signatures.

interface IBox = {
    x: number;
    y: number;
    width: number;
    height: number;
}

class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public width: number;
    public height: number;

    constructor() /* Overload Signature */
    constructor(obj: IBox) /* Overload Signature */
    constructor(obj?: IBox) /* Implementation Constructor */ {
        if (obj) {
            this.x = obj.x;
            this.y = obj.y;
            this.width = obj.width;
            this.height = obj.height;
        } else {
            this.x = 0;
            this.y = 0;
            this.width = 0;
            this.height = 0
        }
    }

    get frame(): string {
        console.log(this.x, this.y, this.width, this.height);
    }
}

new Box().frame; // 0 0 0 0
new Box({ x:10, y:10, width: 70, height: 120 }).frame; // 10 10 70 120



// You could also write the Box class like so;
class Box {
    public x: number = 0;
    public y: number = 0;
    public width: number = 0;
    public height: number = 0;

    constructor() /* Overload Signature */
    constructor(obj: IBox) /* Overload Signature */
    constructor(obj?: IBox) /* Implementation Constructor */ {
        if (obj) {
            this.x = obj.x;
            this.y = obj.y;
            this.width = obj.width;
            this.height = obj.height;
        }
    }

    get frame(): string { ... }
}
4

In the case where an optional, typed parameter is good enough, consider the following code which accomplishes the same without repeating the properties or defining an interface:

export class Track {
   public title: string;
   public artist: string;
   public lyrics: string;

   constructor(track?: Track) {
     Object.assign(this, track);
   }
}

Keep in mind this will assign all properties passed in track, eve if they're not defined on Track.

4
interface IBox {
    x: number;
    y: number;
    height: number;
    width: number;
}

class Box {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;
    public height: number;
    public width: number;

    constructor(obj: IBox) {
        const { x, y, height, width } = { x: 0, y: 0, height: 0, width: 0, ...obj }
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.height = height;
        this.width = width;
    }
}
2
  • In that case, wouldn't it be better to type the parameter as {} instead of IBox? You're already enumerating the property constraints...
    – Roy Tinker
    Commented Jul 5, 2017 at 23:37
  • @RoyTinker yeah, you are right. Basically the answer was wrong and I updated it. Commented Oct 10, 2019 at 15:41
2

We can simulate constructor overload using guards

interface IUser {
  name: string;
  lastName: string;
}

interface IUserRaw {
  UserName: string;
  UserLastName: string;
}

function isUserRaw(user): user is IUserRaw {
  return !!(user.UserName && user.UserLastName);
}

class User {
  name: string;
  lastName: string;

  constructor(data: IUser | IUserRaw) {
    if (isUserRaw(data)) {
      this.name = data.UserName;
      this.lastName = data.UserLastName;
    } else {
      this.name = data.name;
      this.lastName = data.lastName;
    }
  }
}

const user  = new User({ name: "Jhon", lastName: "Doe" })
const user2 = new User({ UserName: "Jhon", UserLastName: "Doe" })
1

I use the following alternative to get default/optional params and "kind-of-overloaded" constructors with variable number of params:

private x?: number;
private y?: number;

constructor({x = 10, y}: {x?: number, y?: number}) {
 this.x = x;
 this.y = y;
}

I know it's not the prettiest code ever, but one gets used to it. No need for the additional Interface and it allows private members, which is not possible when using the Interface.

1

Here is a working example and you have to consider that every constructor with more fields should mark the extra fields as optional.

class LocalError {
  message?: string;
  status?: string;
  details?: Map<string, string>;

  constructor(message: string);
  constructor(message?: string, status?: string);
  constructor(message?: string, status?: string, details?: Map<string, string>) {
    this.message = message;
    this.status = status;
    this.details = details;
  }
}
1

As commented in @Benson answer, I used this example in my code and I found it very useful. However I found with the Object is possibly 'undefined'.ts(2532) error when I tried to make calculations with my class variable types, as the question mark leads them to be of type AssignedType | undefined. Even if undefined case is handled in later execution or with the compiler type enforce <AssignedType> I could not get rid of the error, so could not make the args optional.I solved creating a separated type for the arguments with the question mark params and the class variables without the question marks. Verbose, but worked.

Here is the original code, giving the error in the class method(), see below:

/** @class */

class Box {
  public x?: number;
  public y?: number;
  public height?: number;
  public width?: number;

  // The Box class can work double-duty as the interface here since they are identical
  // If you choose to add methods or modify this class, you will need to
  // define and reference a new interface for the incoming parameters object 
  // e.g.:  `constructor(params: BoxObjI = {} as BoxObjI)` 
  constructor(params: Box = {} as Box) {
    // Define the properties of the incoming `params` object here. 
    // Setting a default value with the `= 0` syntax is optional for each parameter
    const {
      x = 0,
      y = 0,
      height = 1,
      width = 1,
    } = params;

    //  If needed, make the parameters publicly accessible
    //  on the class ex.: 'this.var = var'.
    /**  Use jsdoc comments here for inline ide auto-documentation */
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
  }

  method(): void {
    const total = this.x + 1; // ERROR. Object is possibly 'undefined'.ts(2532)
  }
}

const box1 = new Box();
const box2 = new Box({});
const box3 = new Box({ x: 0 });
const box4 = new Box({ x: 0, height: 10 });
const box5 = new Box({ x: 0, y: 87, width: 4, height: 0 });

So variable cannot be used in the class methods. If that is corrected like this for example:

method(): void {
    const total = <number> this.x + 1;
}

Now this error appears:

Argument of type '{ x: number; y: number; width: number; height: number; }' is not 
assignable to parameter of type 'Box'.
Property 'method' is missing in type '{ x: number; y: number; width: number; height: 
number; }' but required in type 'Box'.ts(2345)

As if the whole arguments bundle was no optional anymore.

So if a type with optional args is created, and the class variables are removed from optional I achieve what I want, the arguments to be optional, and to be able to use them in the class methods. Below the solution code:

type BoxParams = {
  x?: number;
  y?: number;
  height?: number;
  width?: number;
}

/** @class */
class Box {
  public x: number;
  public y: number;
  public height: number;
  public width: number;

  // The Box class can work double-duty as the interface here since they are identical
  // If you choose to add methods or modify this class, you will need to
  // define and reference a new interface for the incoming parameters object 
  // e.g.:  `constructor(params: BoxObjI = {} as BoxObjI)` 
  constructor(params: BoxParams = {} as BoxParams) {
    // Define the properties of the incoming `params` object here. 
    // Setting a default value with the `= 0` syntax is optional for each parameter
    const {
      x = 0,
      y = 0,
      height = 1,
      width = 1,
    } = params;

    //  If needed, make the parameters publicly accessible
    //  on the class ex.: 'this.var = var'.
    /**  Use jsdoc comments here for inline ide auto-documentation */
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
  }

  method(): void {
    const total = this.x + 1;
  }
}

const box1 = new Box();
const box2 = new Box({});
const box3 = new Box({ x: 0 });
const box4 = new Box({ x: 0, height: 10 });
const box5 = new Box({ x: 0, y: 87, width: 4, height: 0 });

Comments appreciated from anyone who takes the time to read and try to understand the point I am trying to make.

Thanks in advance.

2
  • Yes, this is exactly how to use my method when doing customizations (the comment above the constructor directs to the exact solution you have here). A few people have been tripped up on it--my stealing the interface from the class--so I'm tempted to modify my answer. But I'll leave it for history as having my answer "as is" is a required point of reference in your great answer here.
    – Benson
    Commented Jan 17, 2021 at 22:22
  • OK I see. Thanks for clarifyng Commented Jan 18, 2021 at 8:25
1

Generally speaking for N overloads, it might be better to use:

constructor(obj?: {fromType1: IType1} | {fromType2: IType2}) {    
    if(obj){
      if(obj.fromType1){
        //must be of form IType1
      } else if(obj.fromType2){
        //must have used a IType2
      } else {
        throw "Invalid argument 1"
      }
    } else {
      //obj not given
    }
}   

At least now we can check which route to go down and act accordingly

1

As chuckj said, the simple answer is an optional parameter, but what if we want to overload a constructor with more than one parameter, or we want to change parameter order?

Turns out, constructors can be overloaded just like functions:

class FooBar {
  public foo?: number;
  public bar?: string;

  // Constructor A
  constructor(foo: number, bar?: string);
  // Constructor B
  constructor(bar: string, foo?: number);
  // Constructor C
  constructor(bar: string);
  // Constructor D
  constructor(foo: number);
  // Constructor E
  constructor();

  constructor(...args: any[]) {
    switch (args.length) {
      case 2:
        if (typeof args[0] === "number") {
          this.foo = args[0];
          this.bar = args[1];
        } else {
          this.bar = args[0];
          this.foo = args[1];
        }
        break;
      case 1:
        if (typeof args[0] === "number") {
          this.foo = args[0];
        } else {
          this.bar = args[0];
        }
    }

    console.log(this.foo, this.bar);
  }
}

const fooBarConstructorA = new FooBar("150", 25);
const fooBarConstructorB = new FooBar(25, "150");
const fooBarConstructorC = new FooBar("150");
const fooBarConstructorD = new FooBar("150");
const fooBarConstructorE = new FooBar();
-6

You should had in mind that...

contructor()

constructor(a:any, b:any, c:any)

It's the same as new() or new("a","b","c")

Thus

constructor(a?:any, b?:any, c?:any)

is the same above and is more flexible...

new() or new("a") or new("a","b") or new("a","b","c")

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