81

I got a webSocket comunication, I recieve base64 encoded string, convert it to uint8 and work on it, but now I need to send back, I got the uint8 array, and need to convert it to base64 string, so I can send it. How can I make this convertion?

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11 Answers 11

11

All solutions already proposed have severe problems. Some solutions fail to work on large arrays, some provide wrong output, some throw an error on btoa call if an intermediate string contains multibyte characters, some consume more memory than needed.

So I implemented a direct conversion function which just works regardless of the input. It converts about 5 million bytes per second on my machine.

https://gist.github.com/enepomnyaschih/72c423f727d395eeaa09697058238727

/*
MIT License
Copyright (c) 2020 Egor Nepomnyaschih
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all
copies or substantial portions of the Software.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE
SOFTWARE.
*/

/*
// This constant can also be computed with the following algorithm:
const base64abc = [],
	A = "A".charCodeAt(0),
	a = "a".charCodeAt(0),
	n = "0".charCodeAt(0);
for (let i = 0; i < 26; ++i) {
	base64abc.push(String.fromCharCode(A + i));
}
for (let i = 0; i < 26; ++i) {
	base64abc.push(String.fromCharCode(a + i));
}
for (let i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
	base64abc.push(String.fromCharCode(n + i));
}
base64abc.push("+");
base64abc.push("/");
*/
const base64abc = [
	"A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M",
	"N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z",
	"a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m",
	"n", "o", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z",
	"0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "+", "/"
];

/*
// This constant can also be computed with the following algorithm:
const l = 256, base64codes = new Uint8Array(l);
for (let i = 0; i < l; ++i) {
	base64codes[i] = 255; // invalid character
}
base64abc.forEach((char, index) => {
	base64codes[char.charCodeAt(0)] = index;
});
base64codes["=".charCodeAt(0)] = 0; // ignored anyway, so we just need to prevent an error
*/
const base64codes = [
	255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
	255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
	255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 62, 255, 255, 255, 63,
	52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 255, 255, 255, 0, 255, 255,
	255, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,
	15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
	255, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40,
	41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51
];

function getBase64Code(charCode) {
	if (charCode >= base64codes.length) {
		throw new Error("Unable to parse base64 string.");
	}
	const code = base64codes[charCode];
	if (code === 255) {
		throw new Error("Unable to parse base64 string.");
	}
	return code;
}

export function bytesToBase64(bytes) {
	let result = '', i, l = bytes.length;
	for (i = 2; i < l; i += 3) {
		result += base64abc[bytes[i - 2] >> 2];
		result += base64abc[((bytes[i - 2] & 0x03) << 4) | (bytes[i - 1] >> 4)];
		result += base64abc[((bytes[i - 1] & 0x0F) << 2) | (bytes[i] >> 6)];
		result += base64abc[bytes[i] & 0x3F];
	}
	if (i === l + 1) { // 1 octet yet to write
		result += base64abc[bytes[i - 2] >> 2];
		result += base64abc[(bytes[i - 2] & 0x03) << 4];
		result += "==";
	}
	if (i === l) { // 2 octets yet to write
		result += base64abc[bytes[i - 2] >> 2];
		result += base64abc[((bytes[i - 2] & 0x03) << 4) | (bytes[i - 1] >> 4)];
		result += base64abc[(bytes[i - 1] & 0x0F) << 2];
		result += "=";
	}
	return result;
}

export function base64ToBytes(str) {
	if (str.length % 4 !== 0) {
		throw new Error("Unable to parse base64 string.");
	}
	const index = str.indexOf("=");
	if (index !== -1 && index < str.length - 2) {
		throw new Error("Unable to parse base64 string.");
	}
	let missingOctets = str.endsWith("==") ? 2 : str.endsWith("=") ? 1 : 0,
		n = str.length,
		result = new Uint8Array(3 * (n / 4)),
		buffer;
	for (let i = 0, j = 0; i < n; i += 4, j += 3) {
		buffer =
			getBase64Code(str.charCodeAt(i)) << 18 |
			getBase64Code(str.charCodeAt(i + 1)) << 12 |
			getBase64Code(str.charCodeAt(i + 2)) << 6 |
			getBase64Code(str.charCodeAt(i + 3));
		result[j] = buffer >> 16;
		result[j + 1] = (buffer >> 8) & 0xFF;
		result[j + 2] = buffer & 0xFF;
	}
	return result.subarray(0, result.length - missingOctets);
}

export function base64encode(str, encoder = new TextEncoder()) {
	return bytesToBase64(encoder.encode(str));
}

export function base64decode(str, decoder = new TextDecoder()) {
	return decoder.decode(base64ToBytes(str));
}

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156

If your data may contain multi-byte sequences (not a plain ASCII sequence) and your browser has TextDecoder, then you should use that to decode your data (specify the required encoding for the TextDecoder):

var u8 = new Uint8Array([65, 66, 67, 68]);
var decoder = new TextDecoder('utf8');
var b64encoded = btoa(decoder.decode(u8));

If you need to support browsers that do not have TextDecoder (currently just IE and Edge), then the best option is to use a TextDecoder polyfill.

If your data contains plain ASCII (not multibyte Unicode/UTF-8) then there is a simple alternative using String.fromCharCode that should be fairly universally supported:

var ascii = new Uint8Array([65, 66, 67, 68]);
var b64encoded = btoa(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, ascii));

And to decode the base64 string back to a Uint8Array:

var u8_2 = new Uint8Array(atob(b64encoded).split("").map(function(c) {
    return c.charCodeAt(0); }));

If you have very large array buffers then the apply may fail and you may need to chunk the buffer (based on the one posted by @RohitSengar). Again, note that this is only correct if your buffer only contains non-multibyte ASCII characters:

function Uint8ToString(u8a){
  var CHUNK_SZ = 0x8000;
  var c = [];
  for (var i=0; i < u8a.length; i+=CHUNK_SZ) {
    c.push(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, u8a.subarray(i, i+CHUNK_SZ)));
  }
  return c.join("");
}
// Usage
var u8 = new Uint8Array([65, 66, 67, 68]);
var b64encoded = btoa(Uint8ToString(u8));
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  • 4
    This is working for me in Firefox, but Chrome chokes with "Uncaught RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded" (doing the btoa). – Michael Paulukonis Apr 28 '14 at 17:58
  • 4
    Thanks. All I needed was btoa(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, myArray)) – Glen Little Mar 31 '17 at 21:02
  • 26
    This doesn't work if the byte array is not valid Unicode. – Melab Nov 16 '17 at 17:33
  • 3
    The TextDecoder solution fails for me for any value in the Uint8Array >127. The String.fromCharCode however works perfectly. – Stephen Smith Sep 5 '18 at 18:07
  • 9
    There are no multibyte characters in a base64 string, or in Uint8Array. TextDecoder is absolutely the wrong thing to use here, because if your Uint8Array has bytes in range 128..255, text decoder will erroneously convert them into unicode characters, which will break base64 converter. – riv Sep 5 '18 at 23:37
24

Very simple solution and test for JavaScript!

ToBase64 = function (u8) {
    return btoa(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, u8));
}

FromBase64 = function (str) {
    return atob(str).split('').map(function (c) { return c.charCodeAt(0); });
}

var u8 = new Uint8Array(256);
for (var i = 0; i < 256; i++)
    u8[i] = i;

var b64 = ToBase64(u8);
console.debug(b64);
console.debug(FromBase64(b64));
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  • 4
    Cleanest solution! – realappie Jan 13 '17 at 15:28
  • Perfect solution – Haris ur Rehman Jan 28 '19 at 20:23
  • 1
    it fails on large data (such as images) with RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded – Maxim Khokhryakov Apr 22 at 15:53
17
function Uint8ToBase64(u8Arr){
  var CHUNK_SIZE = 0x8000; //arbitrary number
  var index = 0;
  var length = u8Arr.length;
  var result = '';
  var slice;
  while (index < length) {
    slice = u8Arr.subarray(index, Math.min(index + CHUNK_SIZE, length)); 
    result += String.fromCharCode.apply(null, slice);
    index += CHUNK_SIZE;
  }
  return btoa(result);
}

You can use this function if you have a very large Uint8Array. This is for Javascript, can be useful in case of FileReader readAsArrayBuffer.

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  • 2
    Interestingly, in Chrome I timed this on a 300kb+ buffer and found doing it in chunks like you are to be ever so slightly slower than doing it byte by byte. This surprised me. – Matt Aug 24 '16 at 23:10
  • @Matt interesting. It's possible that in the meantime, Chrome has now detects this conversion and has a specific optimization for it and chunking the data may reduce its efficiency. – kanaka Apr 3 '17 at 14:53
  • 2
    This isn’t safe, is it? If my chunk’s boundary cuts through a multi-byte UTF8 encoded character, then fromCharCode() would not be able to create sensible characters from the bytes on both sides of the boundary, would it? – Jens May 22 '17 at 10:49
  • 2
    @Jens String.fromCharCode.apply() methods cannot reproduce UTF-8: UTF-8 characters may vary in length from one byte to four bytes, yet String.fromCharCode.apply() examines a UInt8Array in segments of UInt8, so it erroneously assumes each character to be exactly one byte long and independent of the neighbouring ones. If the characters encoded in the input UInt8Array all happen to be in the ASCII (single-byte) range, it will work by chance, but it cannot reproduce full UTF-8. You need TextDecoder or a similar algorithm for that. – Jamie Birch Sep 29 '17 at 10:28
  • 1
    @Jens what multi-byte UTF8 encoded characters in a binary data array? We're not dealing with unicode strings here, but with arbitrary binary data, which should NOT be treated as utf-8 codepoints. – riv Sep 5 '18 at 23:39
10

If you are using Node.js then you can use this code to convert Uint8Array to base64

var b64 = Buffer.from(u8).toString('base64');
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  • 3
    This is a better answer then the hand rolled functions above in terms of performance. – Ben Liyanage Jan 13 at 21:45
  • 1
    Awesome! Thanks. Best answer ever – Alan Jun 8 at 16:09
0

See here https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Base64_encoding_and_decoding#Appendix.3A_Decode_a_Base64_string_to_Uint8Array_or_ArrayBuffer

(Decode a Base64 string to Uint8Array or ArrayBuffer with Unicode support)

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0

Here is a JS Function to this:

This function is needed because Chrome doesn't accept a base64 encoded string as value for applicationServerKey in pushManager.subscribe yet https://bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=802280

function urlBase64ToUint8Array(base64String) {
  var padding = '='.repeat((4 - base64String.length % 4) % 4);
  var base64 = (base64String + padding)
    .replace(/\-/g, '+')
    .replace(/_/g, '/');

  var rawData = window.atob(base64);
  var outputArray = new Uint8Array(rawData.length);

  for (var i = 0; i < rawData.length; ++i) {
    outputArray[i] = rawData.charCodeAt(i);
  }
  return outputArray;
}
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  • 2
    This converts base64 to Uint8Array. But the question asks how to convert Uint8Array to base64 – Barry Michael Doyle Oct 16 '18 at 7:30
0

Pure JS - no string middlestep (no btoa)

In below solution I omit conversion to string. IDEA is following:

  • join 3 bytes (3 array elements) and you get 24-bits
  • split 24bits to four 6-bit numbers (which take values from 0 to 63)
  • use that numbers as index in base64 alphabet
  • corner case: when input byte array the length is not divided by 3 then add = or == to result

Solution below works on 3-bytes chunks so it is good for large arrays. Similar solution to convert base64 to binary array (without atob) is HERE

function bytesArrToBase64(arr) {
  const abc = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/"; // base64 alphabet
  const bin = n => n.toString(2).padStart(8,0); // convert num to 8-bit binary string
  const l = arr.length
  let result = '';

  for(let i=0; i<=(l-1)/3; i++) {
    let c1 = i*3+1>=l; // case when "=" is on end
    let c2 = i*3+2>=l; // case when "=" is on end
    let chunk = bin(arr[3*i]) + bin(c1? 0:arr[3*i+1]) + bin(c2? 0:arr[3*i+2]);
    let r = chunk.match(/.{1,6}/g).map((x,j)=> j==3&&c2 ? '=' :(j==2&&c1 ? '=':abc[+('0b'+x)]));  
    result += r.join('');
  }

  return result;
}


// ----------
// TEST
// ----------

let test = "Alice's Adventure in Wondeland.";
let testBytes = [...test].map(c=> c.charCodeAt(0) );

console.log('test string:', test);
console.log('bytes:', JSON.stringify(testBytes));
console.log('btoa            ', btoa(test));
console.log('bytesArrToBase64', bytesArrToBase64(testBytes));

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-1

A very good approach to this is shown at the Mozilla Developer Network website:

function btoaUTF16 (sString) {
    var aUTF16CodeUnits = new Uint16Array(sString.length);
    Array.prototype.forEach.call(aUTF16CodeUnits, function (el, idx, arr) { arr[idx] = sString.charCodeAt(idx); });
    return btoa(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, new Uint8Array(aUTF16CodeUnits.buffer)));
}

function atobUTF16 (sBase64) {
    var sBinaryString = atob(sBase64), aBinaryView = new Uint8Array(sBinaryString.length);
    Array.prototype.forEach.call(aBinaryView, function (el, idx, arr) { arr[idx] = sBinaryString.charCodeAt(idx); });
    return String.fromCharCode.apply(null, new Uint16Array(aBinaryView.buffer));
}

var myString = "☸☹☺☻☼☾☿";

var sUTF16Base64 = btoaUTF16(myString);
console.log(sUTF16Base64);    // Shows "OCY5JjomOyY8Jj4mPyY="

var sDecodedString = atobUTF16(sUTF16Base64);
console.log(sDecodedString);  // Shows "☸☹☺☻☼☾☿"

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-3

If all you want is a JS implementation of a base64-encoder, so that you can send data back, you can try the btoa function.

b64enc = btoa(uint);

A couple of quick notes on btoa - it's non-standard, so browsers aren't forced to support it. However, most browsers do. The big ones, at least. atob is the opposite conversion.

If you need a different implementation, or you find an edge-case where the browser has no idea what you're talking about, searching for a base64 encoder for JS wouldn't be too hard.

I think there are 3 of them hanging around on my company's website, for some reason...

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  • Thanks, i didnt try that out before. – Caio Keto Oct 3 '12 at 14:44
  • 10
    Couple of notes. btoa and atob are actually part of the HTML5 standardization process and most browsers do support them in mostly the same way already. Secondly, btoa and atob work with strings only. Running btoa on the Uint8Array will first convert the buffer to a string using toString(). This results in the string "[object Uint8Array]". That's probably not what is intended. – kanaka Oct 3 '12 at 17:06
  • 1
    @CaioKeto you might want to consider changing your selected answer. This answer is not correct. – kanaka Mar 3 '14 at 22:28
-4

npm install google-closure-library --save

require("google-closure-library");
goog.require('goog.crypt.base64');

var result =goog.crypt.base64.encodeByteArray(Uint8Array.of(1,83,27,99,102,66));
console.log(result);

$node index.js would write AVMbY2Y= to the console.

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  • 1
    It's funny that a -ve voted answer is accepted rather than a highly +ve one. – Vishnudev Jun 20 '19 at 11:30

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