41

What is the best way to map a network share to a windows drive using Python? This share also requires a username and password.

7 Answers 7

32

Building off of @Anon's suggestion:

# Drive letter: M
# Shared drive path: \\shared\folder
# Username: user123
# Password: password
import subprocess

# Disconnect anything on M
subprocess.call(r'net use m: /del', shell=True)

# Connect to shared drive, use drive letter M
subprocess.call(r'net use m: \\shared\folder /user:user123 password', shell=True)

I prefer this simple approach, especially if all the information is static.

3
  • I have a question on this setup. When you try to map drive in a web app, is the drive mapped to the user who is running the app or the server?
    – wolf97084
    Mar 5, 2015 at 13:05
  • 5
    Use 'net use a: /del /Y' to force, otherwise it will hang on asking for confirmation to delete
    – Tahlor
    Jun 22, 2017 at 22:10
  • 1
    Also if we do 'net use * ' + "\\UNC path\folder" it will auto find an empty drive slot to mount "UNC\path\folder"
    – Dylan
    Sep 23, 2017 at 16:52
13

Okay, Here's another method...

This one was after going through win32wnet. Let me know what you think...

def mapDrive(drive, networkPath, user, password, force=0):
    print networkPath
    if (os.path.exists(drive)):
        print drive, " Drive in use, trying to unmap..."
        if force:
            try:
                win32wnet.WNetCancelConnection2(drive, 1, 1)
                print drive, "successfully unmapped..."
            except:
                print drive, "Unmap failed, This might not be a network drive..."
                return -1
        else:
            print "Non-forcing call. Will not unmap..."
            return -1
    else:
        print drive, " drive is free..."
    if (os.path.exists(networkPath)):
        print networkPath, " is found..."
        print "Trying to map ", networkPath, " on to ", drive, " ....."
        try:
            win32wnet.WNetAddConnection2(win32netcon.RESOURCETYPE_DISK, drive, networkPath, None, user, password)
        except:
            print "Unexpected error..."
            return -1
        print "Mapping successful"
        return 1
    else:
        print "Network path unreachable..."
        return -1

And to unmap, just use....

def unmapDrive(drive, force=0):
    #Check if the drive is in use
    if (os.path.exists(drive)):
        print "drive in use, trying to unmap..."
        if force == 0:
            print "Executing un-forced call..."
        try:
            win32wnet.WNetCancelConnection2(drive, 1, force)
            print drive, "successfully unmapped..."
            return 1
        except:
            print "Unmap failed, try again..."
            return -1
    else:
        print drive, " Drive is already free..."
        return -1
1
  • 1
    Using win32wnet.WNetAddConnection2 and win32wnet.WNetCancelConnection2 is a good idea. But catching exceptions and returning a return code seems unnecessary. The built-in exceptions already provide you good return info. Also, it's not good practice to catch an empty except. Jan 7, 2016 at 21:56
4

An alternative to subprocess:

import os

os.system("net use m: \\\\shared\folder")

Or

import os

cmd = "net use m: \\\\shared\folder"
os.system(cmd)
3

I don't have a server to test with here at home, but maybe you could simply use the standard library's subprocess module to execute the appropriate NET USE command?

Looking at NET HELP USE from a windows command prompt, looks like you should be able to enter both the password and user id in the net use command to map the drive.

A quick test in the interpreter of a bare net use command w/o the mapping stuff:

>>> import subprocess
>>> subprocess.check_call(['net', 'use'])
New connections will be remembered.

There are no entries in the list.

0
>>>
3

Assuming that you import necessary libraries, This was a part of an RPC server where the client requested the server to map a drive locally...

#Small function to check the availability of network resource.
def isAvailable(path):
    winCMD = 'IF EXIST ' + path + ' echo YES'
    cmdOutPut = subprocess.Popen(winCMD, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True).communicate()
    return string.find(str(cmdOutPut), 'YES',)

#Small function to check if the mention location is a directory
def isDirectory(path):
    winCMD = 'dir ' + path + ' | FIND ".."'
    cmdOutPut = subprocess.Popen(winCMD, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True).communicate()
    return string.find(str(cmdOutPut), 'DIR',)

================Check the white spaces from here, these were a part of a function============

def mapNetworkDrive(self, drive, networkPath, user, password):

    #Check for drive availability
    if isAvailable(drive) > -1:
        #Drive letter is already in use
        return -1

    #Check for network resource availability
    if isAvailable(networkPath) == -1:
        print "Path not accessible: ", networkPath
        #Network path is not reachable
        return -1

    #Prepare 'NET USE' commands
    winCMD1 = 'NET USE ' + drive + ' ' + networkPath
    winCMD2 = winCMD1 + ' ' + password + ' /User' + user

    print "winCMD1 = ", winCMD1
    print "winCMD2 = ", winCMD2
    #Execute 'NET USE' command with authentication
    winCMD = winCMD2
    cmdOutPut = subprocess.Popen(winCMD, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True).communicate()
    print "Executed: ", winCMD
    if string.find(str(cmdOutPut), 'successfully',) == -1:
        print winCMD, " FAILED"
        winCMD = winCMD1
        #Execute 'NET USE' command without authentication, incase session already open
        cmdOutPut = subprocess.Popen(winCMD, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True).communicate()
        print "Executed: ", winCMD
        if string.find(str(cmdOutPut), 'successfully',) == -1:
            print winCMD, " FAILED"
            return -1
        #Mapped on second try
        return 1
    #Mapped with first try
    return 1

def unmapNetworkDrive(self, drive):

    #Check if the drive is in use
    if isAvailable(drive) == -1:
        #Drive is not in use
        return -1

    #Prepare 'NET USE' command
    winCMD = 'net use ' + drive + ' /DELETE'
    cmdOutPut = subprocess.Popen(winCMD, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True).communicate()
    if string.find(str(cmdOutPut), 'successfully',) == -1:
        #Could not UN-MAP, this might be a physical drive
        return -1
    #UN-MAP successful
    return 1
0

If you want to map the current login user, i think subprocess solve your problem. But is you want to control different mappings for different users, from a single master account. You could do this from the register of windows

The idea is to load the profile of a given user.

import win32api
import win32security
import win32profile
import win32netcon
import win32net
import win32netcon
import win32con

il = 'G'
m = '\\\\192.168.1.16\\my_share_folder'
usu = 'my_user'
cla = 'passwd'

#login the user
hUser = win32security.LogonUser(
       usu,
       None,
       cla,
       win32security.LOGON32_LOGON_NETWORK,
       win32security.LOGON32_PROVIDER_DEFAULT 
    )

#load the profile
hReg = win32profile.LoadUserProfile (
             hUser,  
             {"UserName" : usu}
            )

#alter the regedit entries of usu
win32api.RegCreateKey(hReg, "Network")
hkey = win32api.RegOpenKey(hReg, "Network\\", 0, win32con.KEY_ALL_ACCESS)
win32api.RegCreateKey(hkey, il)
hkey = win32api.RegOpenKey(hReg, "Network\\%s" % il, 0, win32con.KEY_ALL_ACCESS)
win32api.RegSetValueEx(hkey, "ConnectionType", 0, win32con.REG_DWORD, 1)
win32api.RegSetValueEx(hkey, "DeferFlags", 0, win32con.REG_DWORD, 4)
win32api.RegSetValueEx(hkey, "ProviderName", 0, win32con.REG_SZ, "Red de Microsoft Windows")
win32api.RegSetValueEx(hkey, "ProviderType", 0, win32con.REG_DWORD, 131072)
win32api.RegSetValueEx(hkey, "RemotePath", 0, win32con.REG_SZ, m)
win32api.RegSetValueEx(hkey, "UserName", 0, win32con.REG_DWORD, 0)
0

I had trouble getting this line to work:

win32wnet.WNetAddConnection2(win32netcon.RESOURCETYPE_DISK, drive, networkPath, None, user, password)

But was successful with this:

win32wnet.WNetAddConnection2(1, 'Z:', r'\\UNCpath\share', None, 'login', 'password') 

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