172

I have a table

create table us
(
 a number
);

Now I have data like:

a
1
2
3
4
null
null
null
8
9

Now I need a single query to count null and not null values in column a

7
  • 3
    Hi, where do you need to this kind of counting database code in what language database are we talking Best Regards, Iordan Aug 13 '09 at 13:03
  • 2
    I am surprised no single answer contains a simple union of select count(*) ... Aug 13 '09 at 13:18
  • 1
    @Lieven: Why on earth would you use a union here? Montecristo's answer is by far the best solution.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:20
  • 1
    Because OP wants it with a single query. Montecristo's answer indeed is by far the best solution... he just needs to add the union :) Aug 13 '09 at 13:24
  • 1
    And that's what I get for reading the title. Will edit.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:27

26 Answers 26

259

This works for Oracle and SQL Server (you might be able to get it to work on another RDBMS):

select sum(case when a is null then 1 else 0 end) count_nulls
     , count(a) count_not_nulls 
  from us;

Or:

select count(*) - count(a), count(a) from us;
5
  • 1
    Using the distinction between count(*) and count(a) also works well with group by
    – shannon
    Mar 4 '15 at 7:36
  • 1
    @shannon I agree, COUNT(a) is a useful comment to add, but this does throw a warning/error depending on your stack and might warrant a comment in code. I would prefer the SUM method.
    – Richard
    Mar 29 '16 at 9:41
  • 4
    Prefer count(*) to count(1)
    – Lei Zhao
    May 15 '18 at 10:42
  • @LeiZhao - Does it make any difference in speed?
    – Ωmega
    Apr 25 at 18:24
  • @Ωmega No difference in speed, I believe, at least for any recent version of RDBMS (within one or two decades). I preferred count(*) not for performance, but for clarity of meaning.
    – Lei Zhao
    Apr 27 at 13:14
73

If I understood correctly you want to count all NULL and all NOT NULL in a column...

If that is correct:

SELECT count(*) FROM us WHERE a IS NULL 
UNION ALL
SELECT count(*) FROM us WHERE a IS NOT NULL

Edited to have the full query, after reading the comments :]


SELECT COUNT(*), 'null_tally' AS narrative 
  FROM us 
 WHERE a IS NULL 
UNION
SELECT COUNT(*), 'not_null_tally' AS narrative 
  FROM us 
 WHERE a IS NOT NULL;
6
  • 7
    +1: By far the simplest, quickest way. I was shocked when every answer wasn't this.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:16
  • 7
    Yes but no. I think he wants to have the number of NULL and not NULL in only one query... You are saying how to do that in two queries... Aug 13 '09 at 13:25
  • @romaintaz: Quite right. I read the title as the question. In five edits, nobody thought to fix it. Yeesh.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:29
  • @romaintaz: Yes you are right, I've taken this as a "run once query to spot how many nulls we have", I don't even know why ^^', going to correct, thanks. Aug 13 '09 at 13:29
  • 1
    @Montecristo: Because the title asked for only counting null :)
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:30
47

Here is a quick and dirty version that works on Oracle :

select sum(case a when null then 1 else 0) "Null values",
       sum(case a when null then 0 else 1) "Non-null values"
from us
7
  • 3
    Similar syntax would work in SQL Server as well. Also, doing it this way will only scan the table once; the UNION solutions will do two table scans. Irrelevant for small tables, very important for huge ones. Aug 13 '09 at 13:37
  • 2
    Only change for SQL Server is "Null values" would have to become 'Null values'. Single quotes, not doubles.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:42
  • 1
    SQLServer uses an index scan for this query vs two index seeks using a union. On a table with 40.000 rows, there is no speed difference. Aug 13 '09 at 13:45
  • 1
    On a table with 11.332.581 rows, there are two table scans, no noticable speed difference (actualy, the union is slightly faster). Aug 13 '09 at 13:50
  • 2
    This did not work for me in Oracle 11g. The version @user155789 posted with "case when a is null then 1 else 0 end" was the syntax that worked.
    – Steve
    Jun 21 '12 at 19:04
28

for non nulls

select count(a)
from us

for nulls

select count(*)
from us

minus 

select count(a)
from us

Hence

SELECT COUNT(A) NOT_NULLS
FROM US

UNION

SELECT COUNT(*) - COUNT(A) NULLS
FROM US

ought to do the job

Better in that the column titles come out correct.

SELECT COUNT(A) NOT_NULL, COUNT(*) - COUNT(A) NULLS
FROM US

In some testing on my system, it costs a full table scan.

3
  • 5
    Good gravy, man, look at the execution plans for these queries. You're kicking off table scans left and right, especially where there's such a bloody simple statement (select count(*) from t where a is null) that does this.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:15
  • 2
    I don't have a database handy to look, but either the column is indexed or not. If it is, it happens via a range scan, otherwise, you are pretty much left with a full table scan. In oracle, NULLs are not stored in the index, so I suspect you example isn't much better. Your milage may very.
    – EvilTeach
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:19
  • 1
    @EvilTeach: Indexes are only helpful when you're not pulling back > ~10% of the rows. After that, full scans are initiated. In this case, you'll get the scan at least once, if not twice.
    – Eric
    Aug 13 '09 at 13:22
26

As i understood your query, You just run this script and get Total Null,Total NotNull rows,

select count(*) - count(a) as 'Null', count(a) as 'Not Null' from us;
0
21

usually i use this trick

select sum(case when a is null then 0 else 1 end) as count_notnull,
       sum(case when a is null then 1 else 0 end) as count_null
from tab
group by a
1
  • 1
    You need to swap count_notnull and count_null, now it gives opposite results :)
    – neu242
    Sep 25 '20 at 12:48
15

Just to provide yet another alternative, Postgres 9.4+ allows applying a FILTER to aggregates:

SELECT
  COUNT(*) FILTER (WHERE a IS NULL) count_nulls,
  COUNT(*) FILTER (WHERE a IS NOT NULL) count_not_nulls
FROM us;

SQLFiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!17/80a24/5

1
  • filter was nice!
    – neu242
    Sep 25 '20 at 13:01
6

This is little tricky. Assume the table has just one column, then the Count(1) and Count(*) will give different values.

set nocount on
    declare @table1 table (empid int)
    insert @table1 values (1),(2),(3),(4),(5),(6),(7),(8),(9),(10),(NULL),(11),(12),(NULL),(13),(14);

    select * from @table1
    select COUNT(1) as "COUNT(1)" from @table1
    select COUNT(empid) "Count(empid)" from @table1

Query Results

As you can see in the image, The first result shows the table has 16 rows. out of which two rows are NULL. So when we use Count(*) the query engine counts the number of rows, So we got count result as 16. But in case of Count(empid) it counted the non-NULL-values in the column empid. So we got the result as 14.

so whenever we are using COUNT(Column) make sure we take care of NULL values as shown below.

select COUNT(isnull(empid,1)) from @table1

will count both NULL and Non-NULL values.

Note: Same thing applies even when the table is made up of more than one column. Count(1) will give total number of rows irrespective of NULL/Non-NULL values. Only when the column values are counted using Count(Column) we need to take care of NULL values.

4

I had a similar issue: to count all distinct values, counting null values as 1, too. A simple count doesn't work in this case, as it does not take null values into account.

Here's a snippet that works on SQL and does not involve selection of new values. Basically, once performed the distinct, also return the row number in a new column (n) using the row_number() function, then perform a count on that column:

SELECT COUNT(n)
FROM (
    SELECT *, row_number() OVER (ORDER BY [MyColumn] ASC) n
    FROM (
        SELECT DISTINCT [MyColumn]
                    FROM [MyTable]
        ) items  
) distinctItems
3

Here are two solutions:

Select count(columnname) as countofNotNulls, count(isnull(columnname,1))-count(columnname) AS Countofnulls from table name

OR

Select count(columnname) as countofNotNulls, count(*)-count(columnname) AS Countofnulls from table name
3

Try

SELECT 
   SUM(ISNULL(a)) AS all_null,
   SUM(!ISNULL(a)) AS all_not_null
FROM us;

Simple!

3

Try this..

SELECT CASE 
         WHEN a IS NULL THEN 'Null' 
         ELSE 'Not Null' 
       END a, 
       Count(1) 
FROM   us 
GROUP  BY CASE 
            WHEN a IS NULL THEN 'Null' 
            ELSE 'Not Null' 
          END 
2

If you're using MS Sql Server...

SELECT COUNT(0) AS 'Null_ColumnA_Records',
(
    SELECT COUNT(0)
    FROM your_table
    WHERE ColumnA IS NOT NULL
) AS 'NOT_Null_ColumnA_Records'
FROM your_table
WHERE ColumnA IS NULL;

I don't recomend you doing this... but here you have it (in the same table as result)

2

use ISNULL embedded function.


1
  • This is also a worthy answer. I personally found that COUNT(DISTINCT ISNULL(A,'')) works even better then COUNT(DISTINCT A) + SUM (CASE WHEN A IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
    – Vladislav
    Oct 24 '13 at 12:05
1
SELECT SUM(NULLs) AS 'NULLS', SUM(NOTNULLs) AS 'NOTNULLs' FROM 
    (select count(*) AS 'NULLs', 0 as 'NOTNULLs' FROM us WHERE a is null
    UNION select 0 as 'NULLs', count(*) AS 'NOTNULLs' FROM us WHERE a is not null) AS x

It's fugly, but it will return a single record with 2 cols indicating the count of nulls vs non nulls.

1

This works in T-SQL. If you're just counting the number of something and you want to include the nulls, use COALESCE instead of case.

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#us') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE #us

CREATE TABLE #us
    (
    a INT NULL
    );

INSERT INTO #us VALUES (1),(2),(3),(4),(NULL),(NULL),(NULL),(8),(9)

SELECT * FROM #us

SELECT CASE WHEN a IS NULL THEN 'NULL' ELSE 'NON-NULL' END AS 'NULL?',
        COUNT(CASE WHEN a IS NULL THEN 'NULL' ELSE 'NON-NULL' END) AS 'Count'
    FROM #us
    GROUP BY CASE WHEN a IS NULL THEN 'NULL' ELSE 'NON-NULL' END

SELECT COALESCE(CAST(a AS NVARCHAR),'NULL') AS a,
        COUNT(COALESCE(CAST(a AS NVARCHAR),'NULL')) AS 'Count'
    FROM #us
    GROUP BY COALESCE(CAST(a AS NVARCHAR),'NULL')
1

Building off of Alberto, I added the rollup.

 SELECT [Narrative] = CASE 
 WHEN [Narrative] IS NULL THEN 'count_total' ELSE    [Narrative] END
,[Count]=SUM([Count]) FROM (SELECT COUNT(*) [Count], 'count_nulls' AS [Narrative]  
FROM [CrmDW].[CRM].[User]  
WHERE [EmployeeID] IS NULL 
UNION
SELECT COUNT(*), 'count_not_nulls ' AS narrative 
FROM [CrmDW].[CRM].[User] 
WHERE [EmployeeID] IS NOT NULL) S 
GROUP BY [Narrative] WITH CUBE;
1
SELECT
    ALL_VALUES
    ,COUNT(ALL_VALUES)
FROM(
        SELECT 
        NVL2(A,'NOT NULL','NULL') AS ALL_VALUES 
        ,NVL(A,0)
        FROM US
)
GROUP BY ALL_VALUES
0
1
select count(isnull(NullableColumn,-1))
1
  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. Apr 27 '18 at 5:14
1

All the answers are either wrong or extremely out of date.

The simple and correct way of doing this query is using COUNT_IF function.

SELECT
  COUNT_IF(a IS NULL) AS nulls,
  COUNT_IF(a IS NOT NULL) AS not_nulls
FROM
  us
0
1

I created the table in postgres 10 and both of the following worked:

select count(*) from us

and

select count(a is null) from us

2
  • 1
    a IS NULL produces TRUE or FALSE, and COUNT() will count all NOT NULL values. So count(a is null) will return the count of all rows.
    – ypresto
    Jun 25 '20 at 5:26
  • @ypresto I agree with you, the answer is incorrect
    – Key.L
    Aug 18 at 6:52
0

if its mysql, you can try something like this.

select 
   (select count(*) from TABLENAME WHERE a = 'null') as total_null, 
   (select count(*) from TABLENAME WHERE a != 'null') as total_not_null
FROM TABLENAME
0
0

Just in case you wanted it in a single record:

select 
  (select count(*) from tbl where colName is null) Nulls,
  (select count(*) from tbl where colName is not null) NonNulls 

;-)

0

for counting not null values

select count(*) from us where a is not null;

for counting null values

 select count(*) from us where a is null;
1
  • 1
    The op asked for single query :) Sep 13 '16 at 8:53
0

In my case I wanted the "null distribution" amongst multiple columns:

SELECT
       (CASE WHEN a IS NULL THEN 'NULL' ELSE 'NOT-NULL' END) AS a_null,
       (CASE WHEN b IS NULL THEN 'NULL' ELSE 'NOT-NULL' END) AS b_null,
       (CASE WHEN c IS NULL THEN 'NULL' ELSE 'NOT-NULL' END) AS c_null,
       ...
       count(*)
FROM us
GROUP BY 1, 2, 3,...
ORDER BY 1, 2, 3,...

As per the '...' it is easily extendable to more columns, as many as needed

-2

Number of elements where a is null:

select count(a) from us where a is null;

Number of elements where a is not null:

select count(a) from us where a is not null;
1
  • 1
    The question is for a single query.
    – DreamWave
    Jul 24 '15 at 8:16

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