180

When I attempt to use a static method from within the body of the class, and define the static method using the built-in staticmethod function as a decorator, like this:

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod  # use as decorator
    def _stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = _stat_func()  # call the staticmethod

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass._stat_func() + Klass._ANS
        return ret

I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):<br>
  File "call_staticmethod.py", line 1, in <module>
    class Klass(object): 
  File "call_staticmethod.py", line 7, in Klass
    _ANS = _stat_func() 
  TypeError: 'staticmethod' object is not callable

I understand why this is happening (descriptor binding), and can work around it by manually converting _stat_func() into a staticmethod after its last use, like so:

class Klass(object):

    def _stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = _stat_func()  # use the non-staticmethod version

    _stat_func = staticmethod(_stat_func)  # convert function to a static method

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass._stat_func() + Klass._ANS
        return ret

So my question is:

Are there better, as in cleaner or more "Pythonic", ways to accomplish this?

5
  • 4
    If you're asking about Pythonicity, then the standard advice is not to use staticmethod at all. They are usually more useful as module-level functions, in which case your problem is not an issue. classmethod, on the other hand... – Benjamin Hodgson Oct 3 '12 at 23:22
  • 1
    @poorsod: Yes, I'm aware of that alternative. However in the actual code where I encountered this issue, making the function a static method rather than putting it at module-level makes more sense than it does in the simple example used in my question. – martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:43
  • @CallMarl: Python isn't C++ and doesn't have protected methods. Prepending an _ to a method name is simply a convention to indicate that something is private (although the language doesn't enforce it) — and may or may not have any bearing w.r.t. inheritance. Regardless, the code in my question is simply for illustrating the problem with calling static methods. – martineau Sep 22 '20 at 14:46
  • @martineau That is right, it's only calling convention. When simple _ mean protected and double __ mean private. Then as I say, in this case applying protected (by calling convention) on static method mean nothing. – CallMarl Sep 24 '20 at 14:51
  • @CallMarl: As I indicated already, the code just something I threw together to post with my question. – martineau Sep 24 '20 at 14:54
201

staticmethod objects apparently have a __func__ attribute storing the original raw function (makes sense that they had to). So this will work:

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod  # use as decorator
    def stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = stat_func.__func__()  # call the staticmethod

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass.stat_func()
        return ret

As an aside, though I suspected that a staticmethod object had some sort of attribute storing the original function, I had no idea of the specifics. In the spirit of teaching someone to fish rather than giving them a fish, this is what I did to investigate and find that out (a C&P from my Python session):

>>> class Foo(object):
...     @staticmethod
...     def foo():
...         return 3
...     global z
...     z = foo

>>> z
<staticmethod object at 0x0000000002E40558>
>>> Foo.foo
<function foo at 0x0000000002E3CBA8>
>>> dir(z)
['__class__', '__delattr__', '__doc__', '__format__', '__func__', '__get__', '__getattribute__', '__hash__', '__init__', '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__setattr__', '__sizeof__', '__str__', '__subclasshook__']
>>> z.__func__
<function foo at 0x0000000002E3CBA8>

Similar sorts of digging in an interactive session (dir is very helpful) can often solve these sorts of question very quickly.

10
  • 1
    Good update...I was just about to ask how you knew this since I don't see it in the documentation -- which makes me a little nervous about using it because it might be an "implementation detail". – martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:31
  • 1
    @martineau Not in this context. Bound and unbound method objects have an im_func attribute for getting the raw function, and the __func__ attribute of these method objects is the same as im_func. staticmethod objects do not have an im_func attribute (as shown by my dir posting above, and confirmed in an actual interpreter session). – Ben Oct 4 '12 at 0:38
  • 2
    I see, so technically it is undocumented in this context. – martineau Oct 4 '12 at 0:56
  • 1
    @AkshayHazari The __func__ attribute of a static method gets you a reference to the original function, exactly as if you had never used the staticmethod decorator. So if your function requires arguments, you'll have to pass them when calling __func__. The error message you quite sounds like you have not given it any arguments. If the stat_func in this post's example took two arguments, you would use _ANS = stat_func.__func__(arg1, arg2) – Ben Jan 23 '18 at 5:48
  • 1
    @AkshayHazari I'm not sure I understand. They can be variables, they just have to be in-scope variables: either defined earlier in the same scope where the class is defined (often global), or defined earlier within the class scope (stat_func itself is such a variable). Did you mean you can't use instance attributes of the class you're defining? That's true, but unsurprising; we don't have an instance of the class, since we're still defining the class! But anyway, I just meant them as standins for whatever arguments you wanted to pass; you could use literals there. – Ben Jan 23 '18 at 7:41
31

This is the way I prefer:

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod
    def stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = stat_func.__func__()

    def method(self):
        return self.__class__.stat_func() + self.__class__._ANS

I prefer this solution to Klass.stat_func, because of the DRY principle. Reminds me of the reason why there is a new super() in Python 3 :)

But I agree with the others, usually the best choice is to define a module level function.

For instance with @staticmethod function, the recursion might not look very good (You would need to break DRY principle by calling Klass.stat_func inside Klass.stat_func). That's because you don't have reference to self inside static method. With module level function, everything will look OK.

4
  • While I agree that using self.__class__.stat_func() in regular methods has advantages (DRY and all that) over using Klass.stat_func(), that wasn't really the topic of my question -- in fact I avoided using the former as not to cloud the issue of the inconsistency. – martineau Dec 10 '14 at 22:06
  • 1
    It's not really an issue of DRY per se. self.__class__ is better because if a subclass overrides stat_func, then Subclass.method will call the subclass's stat_func. But to be completely honest, in that situation it is much better to just use a real method instead of a static one. – asmeurer Apr 12 '17 at 19:44
  • @asmeurer: I can't use a real method because no instances of the class have been created yet—they can't be since the class itself hasn't even been completely defined yet. – martineau Jun 6 '18 at 19:09
  • I wanted a way to call the static method for my class (which is inherited; so the parent actually has the function) and this seems best by far (and will still work if I override it later). – whitey04 Oct 24 '18 at 20:46
12

What about injecting the class attribute after the class definition?

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod  # use as decorator
    def stat_func():
        return 42

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass.stat_func()
        return ret

Klass._ANS = Klass.stat_func()  # inject the class attribute with static method value
1
  • 2
    This is similar to my first attempts at a work around, but I would prefer something that was inside the class...partially because the attribute involved has a leading underscore and is private. – martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:24
11

This is due to staticmethod being a descriptor and requires a class-level attribute fetch to exercise the descriptor protocol and get the true callable.

From the source code:

It can be called either on the class (e.g. C.f()) or on an instance (e.g. C().f()); the instance is ignored except for its class.

But not directly from inside the class while it is being defined.

But as one commenter mentioned, this is not really a "Pythonic" design at all. Just use a module level function instead.

8
  • As I said in my question, I understand why the original code didn't work. Can you explain (or provide a link to something that does) why it's considered unPythonic? – martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:48
  • The staticmethod requires the class object itself to work correctly. But if you call it from within the class at the class level the class isn't really fully defined at that point. So you can't reference it yet. It's ok to call the staticmethod from outside the class, after it's defined. But "Pythonic" is not actually well defined, much like aesthetics. I can tell you my own first impression of that code was not favorable. – Keith Oct 3 '12 at 23:58
  • Impression of which version (or both)? And why, specifically? – martineau Oct 4 '12 at 0:11
  • 5
    No, what I want to do is actually pretty simple -- which is to factor out some common code and reuse it, both to create a private class attribute at class-creation time, and later on within one or more class methods. This common code has no use outside the class, so I naturally want it to be a part of it. Using a metaclass (or a class decorator) would work, but that seems like overkill for something that ought to be easy to do, IMHO. – martineau Oct 4 '12 at 16:32
  • 1
    That's fine for class attributes which are trivial constants as in my simplified example code, but not so much if they're not and require some computation. – martineau Oct 4 '12 at 16:50
8

What about this solution? It does not rely on knowledge of @staticmethod decorator implementation. Inner class StaticMethod plays as a container of static initialization functions.

class Klass(object):

    class StaticMethod:
        @staticmethod  # use as decorator
        def _stat_func():
            return 42

    _ANS = StaticMethod._stat_func()  # call the staticmethod

    def method(self):
        ret = self.StaticMethod._stat_func() + Klass._ANS
        return ret
3
  • 2
    +1 for creativity, but I'm no longer worried about using __func__ because it is now officially documented (see section Other Language Changes of the What's New in Python 2.7 and its reference to Issue 5982). Your solution is even more portable, since it would probably also work in Python versions before to 2.6 (when __func__ was first introduced as a synonym of im_func). – martineau May 16 '14 at 1:12
  • This is the only solution that works with Python 2.6. – benselme Jul 12 '17 at 21:46
  • @benselme: I can't verify your claim because I don't have Python 2.6 installed, but serious doubt it's the only only one... – martineau Jun 6 '18 at 19:12
0

If the "core problem" is assigning class variables using functions, an alternative is to use a metaclass (it's kind of "annoying" and "magical" and I agree that the static method should be callable inside the class, but unfortunately it isn't). This way, we can refactor the behavior into a standalone function and don't clutter the class.

class KlassMetaClass(type(object)):
    @staticmethod
    def _stat_func():
        return 42

    def __new__(cls, clsname, bases, attrs):
        # Call the __new__ method from the Object metaclass
        super_new = super().__new__(cls, clsname, bases, attrs)
        # Modify class variable "_ANS"
        super_new._ANS = cls._stat_func()
        return super_new

class Klass(object, metaclass=KlassMetaClass):
    """
    Class that will have class variables set pseudo-dynamically by the metaclass
    """
    pass

print(Klass._ANS) # prints 42

Using this alternative "in the real world" may be problematic. I had to use it to override class variables in Django classes, but in other circumstances maybe it's better to go with one of the alternatives from the other answers.

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