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I've been using Makefile and to keep some stuff sepparate I decided to include a new common makefile. The problem I faced is that my First makefile looks like this:

Filename Makefile.test

include ./Makefile.a
all: a b c
b:
    @echo "b"
c:
    @echo "c"

Filename Makefile.a

a:
    @echo "a"

When I execute my makefile: make -f Makefile.test I only get "a" printed out and it finishes.

The only way to make it work is place the include bellow (anywhere) the all: target

Is there a reason why this behaves liks this?

Thanks!

10

When you say this:

include ./Makefile.a

make just pulls Makefile.a into the current Makefile in the same way that #include <x.h> does in C: it inserts the contents of Makefile.a to replace the include statement and keeps going. The result is that make sees this when it starts figuring out what to do:

a:
    @echo "a"
all: a b c
b:
    @echo "b"
c:
    @echo "c"

So the first target in source-order will be a and since you didn't specify a target, make will use the first one. That's where your result comes from.

You could explicitly specify the all target if you wanted:

make -f Makefile.test all

That would use the all target regardless of where it appears in the Makefile.

If you're using GNU Make, then you could use .DEFAULT_GOAL to specify a default target inside Makefile.test and then you wouldn't have to worry about the order:

include ./Makefile.a
all: a b c
b:
    @echo "b"
c:
    @echo "c"

.DEFAULT_GOAL := all

Thanks to Idelic for the reminder about this.

  • 3
    If using GNU make, you could also override the default target in Makefile.test by setting .DEFAULT_GOAL := all. – Idelic Oct 4 '12 at 15:07
  • @Idelic: Thanks for the reminder, been awhile since I've done any serious make work. – mu is too short Oct 4 '12 at 17:54

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