61

I already have a function in SQL Server 2005 as:

ALTER function [dbo].[fCalculateEstimateDate] (@vWorkOrderID numeric)
Returns varchar(100)  AS
Begin
  <Function Body>
End

I want to modify this function to accept addition optional parameter @ToDate. I am going to add logic in function if @Todate Provided then do something else continue with existing code.

I modified the function as:

ALTER function [dbo].[fCalculateEstimateDate] (@vWorkOrderID numeric,@ToDate DateTime=null)
Returns varchar(100)  AS
Begin
  <Function Body>
End

Now I can call function as:

SELECT dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate(647,GETDATE())

But it gives error on following call:

SELECT dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate(647)

as

An insufficient number of arguments were supplied for the procedure or function dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate.

which as per my understanding should not happen.

Am I missing anything? Thanks in advance.

101

From CREATE FUNCTION:

When a parameter of the function has a default value, the keyword DEFAULT must be specified when the function is called to retrieve the default value. This behavior is different from using parameters with default values in stored procedures in which omitting the parameter also implies the default value.

So you need to do:

SELECT dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate(647,DEFAULT)
  • 2
    Is there any way to keep SELECT dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate(647) call working?? – MaxRecursion Oct 4 '12 at 7:11
  • 29
    No. Each call to the function must have the same number of parameters specified. You could always create a new function with two parameters, and turn dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate into a wrapper function that simply adds the second parameter to call the new function. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 4 '12 at 7:13
  • 6
    why on earth does this differ from Stored procedures? Im pretty sure you can just skip the second parameter and it would just work! – Peter Feb 4 '15 at 14:36
  • 1
    @Peter - T-SQL is a very crufty language. With lots of warts in odd and surprising places. I can't give you an actual reason for the different, but since stored procedures always appear in standalone contexts rather than as part of larger statements, it's may be parse related. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 4 '15 at 14:40
  • 4
    @Peter it was written by people with no common sense or db using experience – dvdmn Sep 8 '16 at 1:51
21

The way to keep SELECT dbo.fCalculateEstimateDate(647) call working is:

ALTER function [dbo].[fCalculateEstimateDate] (@vWorkOrderID numeric)
Returns varchar(100)  AS
   Declare @Result varchar(100)
   SELECT @Result = [dbo].[fCalculateEstimateDate_v2] (@vWorkOrderID,DEFAULT)
   Return @Result
Begin
End

CREATE function [dbo].[fCalculateEstimateDate_v2] (@vWorkOrderID numeric,@ToDate DateTime=null)
Returns varchar(100)  AS
Begin
  <Function Body>
End
  • 2
    Can't you just say RETURN [dbo].[fCalculateEstimateDate_v2] (@vWorkOrderID,DEFAULT) ? – Derek Tomes May 7 '15 at 1:26
  • Yes! sure. It´s the same – Gus May 7 '15 at 15:03
0

I have found the EXECUTE command as suggested here T-SQL - function with default parameters to work well. With this approach there is no 'DEFAULT' needed when calling the function, you just omit the parameter as you would with a stored procedure.

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