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I am working on a web app which has a width of 640px.

In the document head I set

  <meta name="viewport" content = "width=640, user-scalable=no" />

so the content is nicely displayed and stretched horizontally.
This works perfectly on iOS but in Android the browser opens the website zoomed in so the user has to double click to zoom out and the entire page.

When I change the viewport setting to leave out the user-scalable tag like this:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=640" />

the Android browser adjusts nicely to the 640px - so it works.
The problem however now is, that users can zoom in and out on Android and iOS since the user-scalable tag is not set.

How can I forbid the scaling and at the same time set the viewport width to 640px on Android?

1
  • 1
    this is browser's bug. i've tried everything, nothing worked. at last i removed user-scalable=no only from this browser. it works fine. Jul 25, 2013 at 9:40

3 Answers 3

36
+50

Trying rendering the viewport meta tag like so:

    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0, user-scalable=no" />

Setting scale settings will set user restrictions on how far they can zoom, and so if you set the initial and maximum to the same amount, this should fix the problem.

UPDATE: I was able to fix my bug for android devices all together by setting the below:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=640px, initial-scale=.5, maximum-scale=.5" />

I also noticed that some content, such as p tags were not flowing across the screen, so the hack for that would be to add the background-image property with empty string to any content that is stuck and is not going across the layout view. Hope this helps this time for you.

11
  • apparently when setting the initial-scale to 1.0 it adjusts to 320px, so that the page loads zoomed in (the width of my page is 640px). Setting the initial-scale to 0.5 works as well as 640px though. the user-scalable=no option breaks Android no matter if I use , or ; - so still no solution :(
    – Horen
    Oct 9, 2012 at 9:37
  • 1
    I have tried <meta name="viewport" content = "width=640, user-scalable=no" /> and <meta name="viewport" content = "width=640; user-scalable=no" /> both make the Android browser load the page zoomed in initially
    – Horen
    Oct 9, 2012 at 14:42
  • 1
    cool, that seems to work - so to understand this: user-scalable=no is not needed because initial-scale and maximum-scale is set to the same number?
    – Horen
    Oct 9, 2012 at 14:57
  • 1
    exactly. we can lock the user visible layout this way :) Oct 9, 2012 at 15:10
  • 1
    This says that you should use commas to seperate multiple properties, not semicolons.
    – nickgrim
    Feb 7, 2013 at 12:57
7

I wanted mobile to always show a website 640px wide because of a design that would break otherwise. (a design I did not make..) Thereby I wanted to disable zooming for mobile users. What worked for me me is the following:

- UPDATED 2013-10-31

First of all, there is no way you can do this without Javascript. You will have to check the user agent string. Therefore I created a mobile-viewport.js and included the script just before the closing tag:

function writeViewPort() {
    var ua = navigator.userAgent;
    var viewportChanged = false;
    var scale = 0;

    if (ua.indexOf("Android") >= 0 && ua.indexOf("AppleWebKit") >= 0) {
        var webkitVersion = parseFloat(ua.slice(ua.indexOf("AppleWebKit") + 12));
        // targets android browser, not chrome browser (http://jimbergman.net/webkit-version-in-android-version/)
        if (webkitVersion < 535) {
            viewportChanged = true;
            scale = getScaleWithScreenwidth();
            document.write('<meta name="viewport" content="width=640, initial-scale=' + scale + ', minimum-scale=' + scale + ', maximum-scale=' + scale + '" />');
        }
    }

    if (ua.indexOf("Firefox") >= 0) {
        viewportChanged = true;
        scale = (getScaleWithScreenwidth() / 2);
        document.write('<meta name="viewport" content="width=640, user-scalable=false, initial-scale=' + scale + '" />');
    }

    if (!viewportChanged) {
        document.write('<meta name="viewport" content="width=640, user-scalable=false" />');
    }

    if (ua.indexOf("IEMobile") >= 0) {
        document.write('<meta name="MobileOptimized" content="640" />');
    }

    document.write('<meta name="HandheldFriendly" content="true"/>');
}

function getScaleWithScreenwidth() {
    var viewportWidth = 640;
    var screenWidth = window.innerWidth;
    return (screenWidth / viewportWidth);
}

writeViewPort();

The script checks if the visitor has an android (not chrome) or firefox browser. The android browser does not support the combination of width=640 and user-scalable=false, and the firefox browser does have a double screen width for some strange reason. If the visitor has a windows phone IE browser MobileOptimized is set.

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  • Oh, thank you for this. I had to tweak it a bit to work for my specific site, but now I get a site that fits the browser exactly, even on old Android devices.
    – jeffedsell
    Jan 30, 2014 at 17:38
0

I had the same situation, if you want the content to always fit the screen width without allowing the user to zoom in/out, use the following meta tags (this will work no matter what width you give)

 <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1.0, user-scalable=no" />
1
  • apparently when setting the initial-scale to 1.0 it adjusts to 320px, so that the page loads zoomed in (the width of my page is 640px). Setting the initial-scale to 0.5 works as well as 640px though. the user-scalable=no option breaks Android no matter if I use , or ; - so still no solution :(
    – Horen
    Oct 9, 2012 at 9:35

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