80

How do I disable assertions in Python?

That is, if an assertion fails, I don't want it to throw an AssertionError, but to keep going.

How do I do that?

59

How do I disable assertions in Python?

There are multiple approaches that affect a single process, the environment, or a single line of code.

I demonstrate each.

For the whole process

Using the -O flag (capital O) disables all assert statements in a process.

For example:

$ python -Oc "assert False"

$ python -c "assert False"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError

Note that by disable I mean it also does not execute the expression that follows it:

$ python -Oc "assert 1/0"

$ python -c "assert 1/0"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

For the environment

You can use an environment variable to set this flag as well.

This will affect every process that uses or inherits the environment.

E.g., in Windows, setting and then clearing the environment variable:

C:\>python -c "assert False"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError
C:\>SET PYTHONOPTIMIZE=TRUE

C:\>python -c "assert False"

C:\>SET PYTHONOPTIMIZE=

C:\>python -c "assert False"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError

Same in Unix (using set and unset for respective functionality)

Single point in code

You continue your question:

if an assertion fails, I don't want it to throw an AssertionError, but to keep going.

If you want the code that fails to be exercised, you can catch either ensure control flow does not reach the assertion, for example:

if False:
    assert False, "we know this fails, but we don't get here"

or you can catch the assertion error:

try:
    assert False, "this code runs, fails, and the exception is caught"
except AssertionError as e:
    print(repr(e))

which prints:

AssertionError('this code runs, fails, and the exception is caught')

and you'll keep going from the point you handled the AssertionError.

References

From the assert documentation:

An assert statement like this:

assert expression #, optional_message

Is equivalent to

if __debug__:
    if not expression: raise AssertionError #(optional_message)

And,

the built-in variable __debug__ is True under normal circumstances, False when optimization is requested (command line option -O).

and further

Assignments to __debug__ are illegal. The value for the built-in variable is determined when the interpreter starts.

From the usage docs:

-O

Turn on basic optimizations. This changes the filename extension for compiled (bytecode) files from .pyc to .pyo. See also PYTHONOPTIMIZE.

and

PYTHONOPTIMIZE

If this is set to a non-empty string it is equivalent to specifying the -O option. If set to an integer, it is equivalent to specifying -O multiple times.

  • would it be possible to skip the code that fails in case of 'Single point in code'? I tried setting __debug__ to False but that is not allowed. – Matthijs Sep 4 '19 at 19:32
  • 1
    @Matthijs you can either ensure control flow doesn't reach it (e.g. if False: assert False) or you can catch the Assertion error. Those are your choices. Updated the answer to address your question. – Aaron Hall Sep 4 '19 at 20:36
  • Thanks for the answer, but not yet completely what i was thinking about. I would like to disable asserts inside a function during runtime, ideally with some sort of context manager: assertion is evaluated: foo() and switching assertions off: with skip_assertion(): foo(). The benefit of this being that i dont have to add another flag on the function – Matthijs Sep 4 '19 at 21:42
  • 1
    You could rewrite the bytecode of the function, rewrite the AST, or rewrite the function itself. (manually or programmatically, for either). Rewriting the AST would probably be the most reliable approach ("simply" replace Assert objects with Pass objects). A context manager wouldn't directly work for that, but you could have some kind of mechanism that used decorated functions in that way. Regardless, I don't recommend it. I suspect your reason for wanting to do so is you are calling code you don't control and getting AssertionErrors. If so, you likely need to find a different fix. – Aaron Hall Sep 5 '19 at 15:07
57

Call Python with the -O flag:

test.py:

assert(False)
print 'Done'

Output:

C:\temp\py>C:\Python26\python.exe test.py
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 1, in <module>
    assert(False)
AssertionError

C:\temp\py>C:\Python26\python.exe -O test.py
Done
  • 4
    Assert is not a function, so the parens are superfluous. – Aaron Hall Sep 29 '17 at 14:15
15

Both of the two answers already given are valid (call Python with either -O or -OO on the command line).

Here is the difference between them:

  • -O Turn on basic optimizations. This changes the filename extension for compiled (bytecode) files from .pyc to .pyo.

  • -OO Discard docstrings in addition to the -O optimizations.

(From the Python documentation)

7

Use python -O:

$ python -O
>>> assert False
>>> 
4

You should NOT disable (most) assertions. They catch unanticipated errors when attention is elsewhere. See Rule 5 in "The power of ten".

Instead, guard some expensive assertion checks by something like:

import logging
logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)

if logger.getEffectiveLevel() < logging.DEBUG:
    ok = check_expensive_property()
    assert ok, 'Run !'

One way to keep important assertions, and allow assert statements to be optimized away is by raising them within a selection statement:

if foo_is_broken():
    raise AssertionError('Foo is broken!')
  • 1
    // , The problem is, though, that the statement still adds to cyclomatic complexity, and error handling should handle the rest? – Nathan Basanese Jan 18 '17 at 2:13
  • 1
    The assertions that would be guarded as above are expensive calls that significantly slow down execution. For some algorithms, checks of this sort can take orders of magnitude longer than the entire program. Think of running a naive but simpler implementation (so less likely to contain errors) of the same algorithm to check correctness. Or a check by exhaustive enumeration of something that is out of the question for normal operation. – Ioannis Filippidis Jan 18 '17 at 2:20
  • I don't see much of a problem with readability, because such a statement doesn't add nesting to the code. Extracting it as a function call can move it out of the way, if that's an issue (and I expect that such a refactoring should reduce cyclomatic complexity). In any event, cyclomatic complexity should not govern safety checks. – Ioannis Filippidis Jan 18 '17 at 2:22
2

Running in optimized mode should do it:

python -OO module.py

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.