10

Particularly when editing legacy C++ code, I often find myself manually reformatting something like this:

SomeObject doSomething(firstType argumentOne, secondType argumentTwo, thirdType argumentThree);

to something like this:

SomeObject doSomething(firstType argumentOne,
                       secondType argumentTwo,
                       thirdType argumentThree);

Is there a builtin command to do this? If not, can someone suggest a plugin or provide some VimScript code for it? (J or gq can reverse the process very easily, so it need not go both ways.)

  • This almost seems like a question for superuser – Wug Oct 4 '12 at 19:05
  • 1
    @Wug The Vim community is split between the sites. This is a question about a coding-specific use of Vim and thus is quite appropriate for this site, tho of course I could have asked it there too. – Keith Pinson Oct 4 '12 at 19:17
9

You can use splitjoin.

SomeObject doSomething(firstType argumentOne, secondType argumentTwo, thirdType argumentThree);

Inside or on brackets, type gS to split. You get:

SomeObject doSomething(firstType argumentOne,
    secondType argumentTwo,
    thirdType argumentThree);

You can also use vim-argwrap

  • 2
    Just installed argwrap - it's awesome! :) – Ben Dowling Nov 18 '15 at 1:04
  • 1
    Installed both. For comparison, even splitjoin has more contributions but argwrap is better because it works on all filetypes. splitjoin only works on a handful filetypes and it can't wrap in many situations. It relies on too much specific features. I map argwrap to gaw. It has some bugs that if resolved would be a lot better than splitjoin. – off99555 Nov 29 '16 at 18:03
3

Here's what I've put in my .vimrc. It is more flexible than @rbernabe's answer; it does the formatting based on the cinoptions global settings and simply breaks on commas (and so can be used on more than functions, if needed).

function FoldArgumentsOntoMultipleLines()
    substitute@,\s*@,\r@ge
    normal v``="
endfunction

nnoremap <F2> :call FoldArgumentsOntoMultipleLines()<CR>
inoremap <F2> <Esc>:call FoldArgumentsOntoMultipleLines()<CR>a

This maps F2 in normal and insert mode to doing a search and replace on the current line which converts all commas (with 0 or more spaces after each) into commas with a carriage return after each, then selects the whole group and indents it using the Vim builtin =.

A known shortcoming of this solution is for lines that include multiple template parameters (it breaks on their commas as well instead of just the commas of the normal parameters).

2

I would set a register to a preset macro. After some tests I got the following:

let @x="/\\w\\+ \\w\\+(\nf(_:s­\\(\\w\\+\\)\\@<=,/,\\r            /g\n"

With this line in your vimrc, you can format the methods by executing the macro x: @x with the cursor above of the line you want to format. It adds 12 spaces for indentation so given:

|
SomeObject doSomething(firstType argumentOne, secondType argumentTwo, thirdType argumentThree);

After executing the macro: @x You get

SomeObject doSomething(firstType argumentOne,
             secondType argumentTwo,
             thirdType argumentThree);

If you are in the line of the function definition you could just do a replacement:

:s\(\w\+\)\@,<=,/,\r            /g

Which is easy to put it in a mapping:

nmap <F4> :s/\(\w\+\)\@<=,/,\r            /g<CR>

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