223

I checked here https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/blob/master/doc/spec.md which is the TypeScript Language Specifications but I couldn't find how I can declare a return type of the function.

I showed what I was expecting in the code below: greet(name:string): string {}

class Greeter {
  greeting: string;
  constructor(message: string) {
    this.greeting = message;
  }
  greet(): string {
    return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
  }
}

I know I can use (name:string) => any but this is used mostly when passing callback functions around:

function vote(candidate: string, callback: (result: string) => any) {
  // ...
}
2
  • 1
    Your code correctly declares a return type on your greet() function. What problem are you having? Oct 4, 2012 at 21:34
  • 1
    I was having that I didn't know it was correct. It was what I was expecting to see and what I was hoping to see happened to be correct. LOL :)
    – Tarik
    Oct 4, 2012 at 21:35

8 Answers 8

178

You are correct - here is a fully working example - you'll see that var result is implicitly a string because the return type is specified on the greet() function. Change the type to number and you'll get warnings.

class Greeter {
    greeting: string;
    constructor (message: string) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    greet() : string {
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    }
} 

var greeter = new Greeter("Hi");
var result = greeter.greet();

Here is the number example - you'll see red squiggles in the playground editor if you try this:

greet() : number {
    return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
}
0
63

Return types using arrow notation is the same as previous answers:

const sum = (a: number, b: number) : number => a + b;
56
functionName() : ReturnType { ... }
2
  • Hi how do you write it if return type is array of a Type, will that be function: Array<ReturnType> Jan 9, 2019 at 13:38
  • 3
    functionName() : ReturnType[] { ... } or also functionName() : Array<ReturnType> { ... } (I prefer the first since more readable and short)
    – Luca C.
    Jan 11, 2019 at 8:10
22

You can read more about function types in the language specification in sections 3.5.3.5 and 3.5.5.

The TypeScript compiler will infer types when it can, and this is done you do not need to specify explicit types. so for the greeter example, greet() returns a string literal, which tells the compiler that the type of the function is a string, and no need to specify a type. so for instance in this sample, I have the greeter class with a greet method that returns a string, and a variable that is assigned to number literal. the compiler will infer both types and you will get an error if you try to assign a string to a number.

class Greeter {
    greet() {
        return "Hello, ";  // type infered to be string
    }
} 

var x = 0; // type infered to be number

// now if you try to do this, you will get an error for incompatable types
x = new Greeter().greet(); 

Similarly, this sample will cause an error as the compiler, given the information, has no way to decide the type, and this will be a place where you have to have an explicit return type.

function foo(){
    if (true)
        return "string"; 
    else 
        return 0;
}

This, however, will work:

function foo() : any{
    if (true)
        return "string"; 
    else 
        return 0;
}
1
  • 2
    In some case, you might have two different types return so you could use | (pipe) to declare all the possible return type: function foo(): string|number {}
    – Snook
    Jun 14, 2017 at 11:35
9

External return type declaration to use with multiple functions:

type ValidationReturnType = string | boolean;

function isEqual(number1: number, number2: number): ValidationReturnType {
    return number1 == number2 ? true : 'Numbers are not equal.';
}

1
  • type ValidationReturnType = string | boolean; it is good to define some return types like this one.
    – Frank Guo
    Jan 26, 2022 at 5:00
5

example of Function expression return type is:

const testFunction = (value:string|number):string | number =>{
    return value;
}

Generic type Function expression

const foo = <T>(x: T):T => x;
2

tldr;

getUserRole(name: string) {
   const roles: Role[] = [{ name: 'admin' }, { name: 'admin' }]
   return roles.find(role => role.name === name) || null;
}


let userRole: ReturnType<typeof getUserRole>; // as type of Role | null
2
  • The only function definition shown here is getUserRole and its return type is not declared here. This only shows return type inference. Can you edit this answer to explain how it answers the question?
    – Ruzihm
    Mar 10, 2022 at 22:12
  • 1
    I'm not sure this answers the question, but it's the exact information I was looking for!
    – Joe Coder
    Apr 9, 2022 at 4:29
0
function getTime(): number {
  return new Date().getTime();
} 

this is a simple example you can have any type instead of number or you can even have mutiple type for both input and output with the help of union types, for example:

 function testfunction(value:string | number):string | number{

return value;
  }

the input value can be string or number.

the output value can be string or number.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.