39

Normally you can define a cast for a class by using the following syntax:

class Test {
public:
  explicit operator bool() { return false; }
};

Is there a way to do this or something similar for an enum class?

  • 2
    If you did that, what would be the point of using enum class at all? enum can be forward declared, given an underlying type, and is scoped with the enumeration name. If you can freely convert them from/to integers... why use an enum class at all? Because it's new? – Nicol Bolas Oct 5 '12 at 20:31
  • 4
    Because I still don't want to have the enum class convert to an integer, but I would be able to define it to be able to be converted to a bool, and have specific values evaluate to true and others to false. – OmnipotentEntity Oct 5 '12 at 20:31
  • 1
    Note that there is no such thing as an "implicit cast". A cast is something you write in your source code. It tells the compiler to do a conversion. So a cast is an explicit conversion. The compiler can also do some conversions without a cast; those are known as "implicit conversions". – Pete Becker Oct 5 '12 at 21:29
  • 1
    @NicolBolas I was googling here because I would have liked implicit conversion to bool, where one enum is SUCCESS and the others are error-codes. Obviously, one can put in a comparison, but with the variable names as they were it wasn't needed for clarity. – Andrew Lazarus Nov 8 '14 at 0:01
20

No, it's not.

Actually, an enum class is no class at all. The class keyword is only used because suddenly changing the unscoped enum to a scoped enum would have mean reworking all enums codes. So the committee decided that to distinguish between new-style and old-style enums, the new ones would be tagged with class, because it's a keyword already so no enum could have been named class in C++. They could have picked another, it would not have made much more sense anyway.

However, despite the class keyword they are still regular enums in that only enumerators (and potentially values assigned to them) are allowed within the brackets.

  • 4
    enum class was first used with nearly the same semantics by C++/CLI. The Standard adopted the existing syntax and standardized it. – Ben Voigt Oct 5 '12 at 22:00
  • 5
    Makes sense. Too bad C++/CLI hadn't used enum namespace, but it is what it is. – Eljay Nov 14 '17 at 18:00
14

No, but you can make a normal class type act like an enum class, using constexpr members and constructors. And then you can add all the additional member functions you want.


Proof that it can work even with switch:

#include <iostream>

struct FakeEnum
{
    int x;

    constexpr FakeEnum(int y = 0) : x(y) {}

    constexpr operator int() const { return x; }

    static const FakeEnum A, B, Z;
};

constexpr const FakeEnum FakeEnum::A{1}, FakeEnum::B{2}, FakeEnum::Z{26};

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& st, FakeEnum& fe)
{
    int val;
    st >> val;
    fe = FakeEnum{val};
    return st;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hello, world!\n";
    FakeEnum fe;
    std::cin >> fe;

    switch (fe)
    {
        case FakeEnum::A:
        std::cout << "A\n";
        break;
        case FakeEnum::B:
        std::cout << "B\n";
        break;
        case FakeEnum::Z:
        std::cout << "Z\n";
        break;
    }
}

Proof that working with switch does not require implicit interconversion with int:

#include <iostream>

/* pseudo-enum compatible with switch and not implicitly convertible to integral type */
struct FakeEnum
{
    enum class Values { A = 1, B = 2, Z = 26 };
    Values x;

    explicit constexpr FakeEnum(int y = 0) : FakeEnum{static_cast<Values>(y)} {}
    constexpr FakeEnum(Values y) : x(y) {}

    constexpr operator Values() const { return x; }
    explicit constexpr operator bool() const { return x == Values::Z; }

    static const FakeEnum A, B, Z;
};

constexpr const FakeEnum FakeEnum::A{Values::A}, FakeEnum::B{Values::B}, FakeEnum::Z{Values::Z};

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& st, FakeEnum& fe)
{
    int val;
    st >> val;
    fe = FakeEnum(val);
    return st;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hello, world!\n";
    FakeEnum fe;
    std::cin >> fe;

    switch (fe)
    {
        case FakeEnum::A:
        std::cout << "A\n";
        break;
        case FakeEnum::B:
        std::cout << "B\n";
        break;
        case FakeEnum::Z:
        std::cout << "Z\n";
        break;
    }
    // THIS ERRORS: int z = fe;
}
  • Boost is a good example of this -- look at the part for non-C++11 (BOOST_NO_SCOPED_ENUMS is defined) and extend that -- boost.org/doc/libs/1_50_0/boost/detail/… – Travis Gockel Oct 5 '12 at 22:15
  • “you can make a normal class type act like an enum class” — Unfortunately you can’t, in C++, because C++’ switch is stupid (it’s also hard/impossible to make it into a POD while preserving sane invariants such as private constructor). – Konrad Rudolph Feb 13 '18 at 18:22
  • @KonradRudolph You can make your class switch-able if you define a single conversion function to integral or enumeration type. What do you mean by "switch is stupid"? (if you recall what point you were trying to make there) – villapx Apr 11 at 15:37
  • @villapx It’s stupid because it only works on integral constant values for no good reason other than its history. Modern languages have switch statements that are vastly more useful by supporting custom types and powerful pattern matching. By contrast, unless you’re writing (or, more likely auto-generating) a state machine on integer states, the switch statement offers virtually no advantage over an if statement with multiple if else branches. – Konrad Rudolph Apr 11 at 17:08
  • 1
    @KonradRudolph: Note that the values A, B, Z, don't actually have to exist in the secret enum class type... an enum class object is (unlike a legacy enum) guaranteed to be able to store the same set of values as its underlying type, whether or not they are part of the closure of enumerators under bitwise-OR. – Ben Voigt Apr 12 at 14:00
4

You cant define non-member cast operators in C++. And you certainly cant define member functions for enums. So I suggest you do free functions to convert your enum to other types, the same way you would implement cast operators.

e.g.

bool TestToBool(enum_e val)
{
    return false;
}

const char *TestToString(enum_e val)
{
    return "false";
}

There is a nice way of associating those enums to bools, you have to split it on two files .h and .cpp. Here it is if it helps:

enum.h

///////////////////////////////
// enum.h
#ifdef CPP_FILE
#define ENUMBOOL_ENTRY(A, B)            { (enum_e) A, (bool) B },
struct EnumBool
{
    enum_e  enumVal;
    bool    boolVal;
};
#else
#define ENUMBOOL_ENTRY(A, B)            A,
#endif


#ifdef CPP_FILE
static EnumBool enumBoolTable[] = {
#else
enum enum_e
{
#endif
ENUMBOOL_ENTRY(ItemA, true),
ENUMBOOL_ENTRY(ItemB, false),
...
};

bool EnumToBool(enum_e val);

enum.cpp

///////////////////////////////
// enum.cpp
#define CPP_FILE
#include "enum.h"

bool EnumToBool(enum_e val)
    //implement

I didnt compile it so take it easy if it has any errors :).

  • FYI: You can't have both of those. Just one or the other. – Nicol Bolas Oct 5 '12 at 20:37
  • 2
    Nitpick: TestToString should be returning a const char*. – Ed S. Oct 5 '12 at 20:39
  • Nitpick: TestToString should be returning std::string – jwm Apr 12 at 0:48

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