175

I have a list of Booleans:

[True, True, False, False, False, True]

and I am looking for a way to count the number of True in the list (so in the example above, I want the return to be 3.) I have found examples of looking for the number of occurrences of specific elements, but is there a more efficient way to do it since I'm working with Booleans? I'm thinking of something analogous to all or any.

0
239

True is equal to 1.

>>> sum([True, True, False, False, False, True])
3
3
  • 24
    That is not idiomatic and makes "abuse" of the type coercion of bool. – Jan Segre Sep 4 '14 at 22:19
  • 27
    @Jan Segre, there's no coercion, bool is an integer type. – panda-34 Mar 2 '16 at 17:28
  • 28
    @panda-34, I checked and issubclass(bool, int) in fact holds, so there is no coercion. – Jan Segre Mar 10 '16 at 20:30
185

list has a count method:

>>> [True,True,False].count(True)
2

This is actually more efficient than sum, as well as being more explicit about the intent, so there's no reason to use sum:

In [1]: import random

In [2]: x = [random.choice([True, False]) for i in range(100)]

In [3]: %timeit x.count(True)
970 ns ± 41.1 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

In [4]: %timeit sum(x)
1.72 µs ± 161 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
3
  • 2
    I can't count False values if there is 0 value also – Kostanos Aug 20 '15 at 18:55
  • 10
    You can't use sum of the other answer if you have other "true" values besides 1 or True either. Besides, then question didn't mention anything but True or False. – Mark Tolonen Jan 6 '17 at 22:05
  • Although not the OPs intent, I think it's worth pointing out that sum works on other types (e.g. generators) while count does not. – Simply Beautiful Art Nov 27 '20 at 3:00
46

If you are only concerned with the constant True, a simple sum is fine. However, keep in mind that in Python other values evaluate as True as well. A more robust solution would be to use the bool builtin:

>>> l = [1, 2, True, False]
>>> sum(bool(x) for x in l)
3

UPDATE: Here's another similarly robust solution that has the advantage of being more transparent:

>>> sum(1 for x in l if x)
3

P.S. Python trivia: True could be true without being 1. Warning: do not try this at work!

>>> True = 2
>>> if True: print('true')
... 
true
>>> l = [True, True, False, True]
>>> sum(l)
6
>>> sum(bool(x) for x in l)
3
>>> sum(1 for x in l if x)
3

Much more evil:

True = False
3
  • Ok, I see your example, and I see what it's doing. Apart from the LOL-ness of it, is there actually a good reason to do what you've shown here? – acs Oct 7 '12 at 4:43
  • 2
    Yes, for the top part. As I indicated, the Python test for a "true " (as in an if statement) is more complicated than just testing for True. See docs.python.org/py3k/library/stdtypes.html#truth. The True = 2 was just to reinforce that the concept of "true" is more complex; with a little bit of extra code (i.e. using bool()) you can make the solution more robust and more general. – Ned Deily Oct 7 '12 at 5:03
  • 15
    In Python 3, True and False are keywords and you can't change them. – ThePiercingPrince Aug 17 '13 at 13:57
8

You can use sum():

>>> sum([True, True, False, False, False, True])
3
5

Just for completeness' sake (sum is usually preferable), I wanted to mention that we can also use filter to get the truthy values. In the usual case, filter accepts a function as the first argument, but if you pass it None, it will filter for all "truthy" values. This feature is somewhat surprising, but is well documented and works in both Python 2 and 3.

The difference between the versions, is that in Python 2 filter returns a list, so we can use len:

>>> bool_list = [True, True, False, False, False, True]
>>> filter(None, bool_list)
[True, True, True]
>>> len(filter(None, bool_list))
3

But in Python 3, filter returns an iterator, so we can't use len, and if we want to avoid using sum (for any reason) we need to resort to converting the iterator to a list (which makes this much less pretty):

>>> bool_list = [True, True, False, False, False, True]
>>> filter(None, bool_list)
<builtins.filter at 0x7f64feba5710>
>>> list(filter(None, bool_list))
[True, True, True]
>>> len(list(filter(None, bool_list)))
3
5

After reading all the answers and comments on this question, I thought to do a small experiment.

I generated 50,000 random booleans and called sum and count on them.

Here are my results:

>>> a = [bool(random.getrandbits(1)) for x in range(50000)]
>>> len(a)
50000
>>> a.count(False)
24884
>>> a.count(True)
25116
>>> def count_it(a):
...   curr = time.time()
...   counting = a.count(True)
...   print("Count it = " + str(time.time() - curr))
...   return counting
... 
>>> def sum_it(a):
...   curr = time.time()
...   counting = sum(a)
...   print("Sum it = " + str(time.time() - curr))
...   return counting
... 
>>> count_it(a)
Count it = 0.00121307373046875
25015
>>> sum_it(a)
Sum it = 0.004102230072021484
25015

Just to be sure, I repeated it several more times:

>>> count_it(a)
Count it = 0.0013530254364013672
25015
>>> count_it(a)
Count it = 0.0014507770538330078
25015
>>> count_it(a)
Count it = 0.0013344287872314453
25015
>>> sum_it(a)
Sum it = 0.003480195999145508
25015
>>> sum_it(a)
Sum it = 0.0035257339477539062
25015
>>> sum_it(a)
Sum it = 0.003350496292114258
25015
>>> sum_it(a)
Sum it = 0.003744363784790039
25015

And as you can see, count is 3 times faster than sum. So I would suggest to use count as I did in count_it.

Python version: 3.6.7
CPU cores: 4
RAM size: 16 GB
OS: Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS

3

It is safer to run through bool first. This is easily done:

>>> sum(map(bool,[True, True, False, False, False, True]))
3

Then you will catch everything that Python considers True or False into the appropriate bucket:

>>> allTrue=[True, not False, True+1,'0', ' ', 1, [0], {0:0}, set([0])]
>>> list(map(bool,allTrue))
[True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True]

If you prefer, you can use a comprehension:

>>> allFalse=['',[],{},False,0,set(),(), not True, True-1]
>>> [bool(i) for i in allFalse]
[False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]
1

I prefer len([b for b in boollist if b is True]) (or the generator-expression equivalent), as it's quite self-explanatory. Less 'magical' than the answer proposed by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams.

Alternatively, you can do this, which still assumes that bool is convertable to int, but makes no assumptions about the value of True: ntrue = sum(boollist) / int(True)

3
  • Your solution has at least two problems. One, it suffers from the same robustness issue; that you could fix by just changing the test to if b. But, more importantly, you are constructing a throwaway list requiring all values to be in memory at once and you can't use len with a generator expression. Better to avoid such practices so that the solution can scale. – Ned Deily Oct 7 '12 at 4:29
  • @Ned Deily :if b is exactly wrong. It would only be correct if the question was about items that evaluate as True, rather than actual True booleans. I take your second point though. In that case there's the variant sum(1 if b is True else 0 for b in boollist). – kampu Oct 8 '12 at 6:24
  • As I noted elsewhere, it's not clear to me from the question whether the OP really means to count only objects of type bool with the value 1 or means the larger and generally more useful set of values that evaluate true. If the former, then an identity test is the right approach but it's also limiting. Objects of type bool are rather odd ducks in Python anyway, a relatively recent addition to the language. In any case I'd go for the simpler: sum(1 for b in boollist if b is True) – Ned Deily Oct 8 '12 at 7:16

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