3

I have an enum as follows:

public enum SomeType {
    SOME_KEY (some-display-value-as-label);
    private String label;

    private SomeType(String label){
        this.label=label;
    }
    public String getLabel() {
        return label;
    }
    public void setLabel(String value) {
        this.label = value;
    }
}

Now I am using google reflections library and have come up with a custom Annotation where I mark the enum above with an annotation like @makejson.

The idea is to scan on app startup using reflections for all classes with the @makejson annotation and then generate the json object for each of these enums.

What I'm trying to do is in the startup class:

Reflections reflections = new Reflections("my.package.name");
Set<Class<?>> annotatedClasses = reflections.getTypesAnnotatedWith(MakeJson.class);
    for (Class<?> annotated : annotatedClasses) {
        if  (annotated.isEnum()) {
            MakeJson j = annotated.getAnnotation(MakeJson.class);
            Object[] constants = annotated.getEnumConstants();
            Method[] methods = annotated.getMethods();
            Method getValue = null;
            for (Method m : methods) {
                if ("valueOf".equals(m.getName())) {
                    getValue = m; //get Reference of valueOf method
                    break;
                }    
            }
            //List<Object> labels = Arrays.asList(m.invokem.getReturnType().isEnum()(annotated));
            for (Object constant : constants) {
                System.out.println(constant.toString());
                System.out.println(getValue.invoke(annotated,constant.toString()));
            }
        }
    }

This code breaks with the following exception: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: wrong number of arguments

Any help would be greatly appreciated. The end objective is to be able to get a json object for SomeType{SOME_KEY:"display-value"}. For this I am unable to get the value of the enum constant using Reflection.

  • 4
    To be honest: I find a mutable enum to be a very strange construct, and would consider it a code-smell. – Joachim Sauer Oct 8 '12 at 13:02
  • Can you kindly clarify a bit more about the 'code-smell'! Also, I do not want the enum to be mutable as I'm not going to modify it. All I want is to generate a JSON out of it dynamically so that I don't need to hard code the class names anywhere. This has to be used on the client side. – DeeTee Oct 8 '12 at 13:12
  • Why not simply using "GSON" and let it generate the JSON for you? It has all the features that you're looking for including Annotations and stuff. – seba.wagner Oct 8 '12 at 13:41
  • @seba.wagner: GSON translates any existing Enum object to string with the attribute name in the encapsulating class eg for an attribute private SomeType type, GSON does {...,type:"SOME_KEY",...}. I need the entire Enum as json which I think GSON doesn't do! – DeeTee Oct 8 '12 at 13:53
  • @JoachimSauer A mutable enum is a strange concept, but I don't see how that relates to the original question. It doesn't seem to me that he is trying to do anything like that. – LordOfThePigs Oct 8 '12 at 14:13
2

My previous answer is wrong. What's happening here is that the Enum class defines a public static valueOf(Class<?>, String) method. When the java compiler transforms your enum SomeType into a class, it will generate a public class SomeType extends Enum<SomeType>, and will add another valueOf(String) method to your SomeType class. You therefore end up with two methods called "valueOf" in your class. To me it appears that you are actually calling valueOf(Class, String), but really intended to call valueOf(String)

To fix that problem, change your loop from :

Method[] methods = annotated.getMethods();
Method getValue = null;
for (Method m : methods) {
    if ("valueOf".equals(m.getName())) {
        getValue = m; //get Reference of valueOf method
        break;
    }    
}

to

Method getValue = annotated.getMethod("valueOf", new Class<?>[]{String.class});

Your problem should then be fixed.

  • This ends up returning exactly what .values() does hence I had originally not taken this! – DeeTee Oct 8 '12 at 14:29
  • So what is it that you want? This is what your current code does? Do you actually want to call your getLabel() method on the enum member? If that's the case, why don't you just use annotated.getMethod("getValue") instead? – LordOfThePigs Oct 8 '12 at 14:35
  • yes, I could do annotated.getMethod("getValue"); and call it using getValue.invoke(constant) inside the for loop that iterates over getEnumConstants(). However, that would've meant hard-coding the method name in the class that I intend to use generically and also forcing the enum author to always name the method exactly same. Using my approach, the author of the enum can tell the annotation which can convey to the generic class about the actual method name to use. +1ing your reply :) – DeeTee Oct 8 '12 at 14:48
1

What about this:

    Map tmp = new HashMap<SomeType, String>();
    for(SomeType type : SomeType.values()){
        tmp.put(type, type.getLabel());
    }
    String desiredJson = new Gson().toJson(tmp);
0

So here's what I ended up doing: I modified the @makejson annotation to include a field called label which is mandatory and which should be set to the method that can return the description associated with SOME_KEY in the enum.

Here's what the annotation looks like:

@Target({ElementType.TYPE})
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
public @interface MakeJson {
    String label();
}

so the annotation at the enum declaration looks like @makejson(label="getLabel") public enum SomeType { ... // same as in the question above }

Then in the parsing class, I simply get this method from the annotation's method and invoke it for the correct constant:

    Reflections reflections = new Reflections("my.package.name");
    Set<Class<?>> annotatedClasses = reflections.getTypesAnnotatedWith(MakeJson.class);
    for (Class<?> annotated : annotatedClasses) {
        if  (annotated.isEnum()) {
            Jsonify j = annotated.getAnnotation(MakeJson.class);
            Object[] constants = annotated.getEnumConstants();
            Method m = annotated.getMethod(j.label()); // get the method name
            for (Object constant : constants) {
                System.out.println(constant.toString());
                System.out.println(m.invoke(constant));
                // construct json object here
            }
        }
    }

So in the end I circumvented the issue of not being able to call the method using reflection by using annotation to plug this info in at runtime!

  • 1
    Or even better, you could use another annotation on the method that returns your label, this way your code will not break when someone changes the name of the method while doing a refactoring and forget to change the value in the annotation. – LordOfThePigs Oct 9 '12 at 7:27
  • Yeah that's actually better :) – DeeTee Oct 9 '12 at 8:42

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