42

Let's say I have this element for displaying the website logo:

<div id="web-title">
  <a href="http://website.com" title="Website" rel="home">
    <span>Website Name</span>
  </a>
</div>

The #blog-title would be styled with background:url(http://website.com/logohere.png), but how to properly hide the text Website Name? As seen here: Hide text using css or here https://stackoverflow.com/a/2705328 , I've seen various methods to hide the text, such as:

#web-title span { text-indent: -9999px; }

or

#web-title span { font-size: -9999px; }

or

#web-title span { position: absolute; top: -9999px; left: -9999px; }

I've also seen some combine those three methods. But actually which one is the best practice to hide text effectively?

  • 2
    how about display: none? – F. Müller Oct 8 '12 at 14:10
  • Not constructive: As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or specific expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. – Florent Oct 8 '12 at 14:11
  • Ain't no smart ass, but can't you just put an image tag instead? I'm just a practical person who doesn't like ugly ad-hoc solutions. maybe I'm wrong – Mark Segal Oct 8 '12 at 14:11
  • 1
    Here's a list of most image replacement techniques, their pros and cons: css-tricks.com/examples/ImageReplacement – coopersita Oct 8 '12 at 14:36
  • 1
    more up-to-date roundup of techniques: css-tricks.com/the-image-replacement-museum – ptim Feb 9 '17 at 0:05

11 Answers 11

79

Actually, a new technique came out recently. This article will answer your questions: http://www.zeldman.com/2012/03/01/replacing-the-9999px-hack-new-image-replacement

.hide-text {
  text-indent: 100%;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
}

It is accessible, an has better performance than -99999px.

Update: As @deathlock mentions in the comment area, the author of the fix above (Scott Kellum), has suggested using a transparent font: http://scottkellum.com/2013/10/25/the-new-kellum-method.html.

| improve this answer | |
17

you can simply make it transparent

{
   width: 20px;
   height: 20px;
   overflow: hidden; 
   color:transparent;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • +1 this works great if you have a link that you need to still be active. I used this to get rid of numbers on an old image slider and the links work fine. – Dan Beaulieu Feb 9 '15 at 21:28
  • This is the solution that ended up working for my needs. I have a button which has a graphic via the css background-image property and on mobile devices I wanted to collapse the button down and hide the text. – Brad Johnson Mar 21 '15 at 2:56
6

Can't you use simply display: none; like this

HTML

<div id="web-title">
   <a href="http://website.com" title="Website" rel="home">
       <span class="webname">Website Name</span>
   </a>
</div>

CSS

.webname {
   display: none;
}

Or how about playing with visibility if you are concerned to reserve the space

.webname {
   visibility: hidden;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Display:none has very bad implications for people using screen readers. It's a big accessibility no-no. – coopersita Oct 8 '12 at 14:19
  • 1
    @Mr.Alien: I believe it's because screen readers that respect CSS will plain skip over the undisplayed elements. You don't want this to happen for headings. Basically, you want to hide the text from not-screen-readers only. – millimoose Oct 8 '12 at 14:28
  • 3
    but what's the use of reading a text which actually you want to hide, and if you really want that it should be readed out than why to hide? and where this user has said that he wants a reader compatible solution? – Mr. Alien Oct 8 '12 at 14:30
  • 3
    He didn't say he wants screen readers, but he asked what's best practice. Providing good accessibility is the proper way of doing things. Imagine he devastating it would be for screen readers if you did this to your logo and menu items. – coopersita Oct 8 '12 at 14:46
  • 1
    @Mr.Alien The logo would be replacing the text showing the name of your site. There is a reason that's usually placed first on a page... Most people want to know in what site they are... – coopersita Oct 8 '12 at 14:51
3

the way most developers will do is:

<div id="web-title">
   <a href="http://website.com" title="Website" rel="home">
       <span class="webname">Website Name</span>
   </a>
</div>

.webname {
   display: none;
}

I used to do it too, until i realized that you are hiding content for devices. aka screen-readers and such.

So by passing:

#web-title span {text-indent: -9000em;}

you ensure that the text still is readable.

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  • That is bloody brilliant. Was stuck on a problem where i wanted to hide some parts of the ajax file uploader, such as the dropzone and some text in StatusContainer. This little hack did the trick. – Mana Apr 13 '15 at 14:47
2

Add .hide-text class to your span that has the text

.hide-text{
display:none;
 }

or make the text transparent

.hide-text{
 color:rgba(0,0,0,0);
 }

use according to your use case.

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0

If you're willing to accomodate this in your markup (as you are in your question with the holding the text), I'd go with whatever jQuery UI went with in their CSS helpers:

.ui-helper-hidden-accessible { 
    position: absolute !important; 
    clip: rect(1px 1px 1px 1px); 
    clip: rect(1px,1px,1px,1px); 
}

The image replacement techniques are good if you absolutely refuse to add extra markup for the text to be hidden in the container for the image.

| improve this answer | |
0

What Google(search bot) needs is same content should be served to bot as it is served to user. Indenting text away (any text) gets bot to think it is a spam or you are serving different content to user and bot.

The best method is to directly use logo as an image inside your anchor tag. Give an 'alt' to your image. This will be perfect for bot to read & also will help in image searching.

This is straight from the horse's mouth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBLvn_WkDJ4

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0

As of September of 2015, the most common practice is to use the following CSS:

.sr-only{
    clip: rect(1px, 1px, 1px, 1px);
    height: 1px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: absolute !important;
    width: 1px;
}
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0

I do it like this:

.hidden-text {
  left: 100%;
  display: inline-block;
  position: fixed;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Another way

position: absolute;
top: 0px;
left: -5000px;
| improve this answer | |
-2

I realize this is an old question, but the Bootstrap framework has a built in class (sr-only) to handle hiding text on everything but screen readers:

<a href="/" class="navbar-brand"><span class="sr-only">Home</span></a>
| improve this answer | |

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