146

I'm trying to check whether a string contains a substring in C like:

char *sent = "this is my sample example";
char *word = "sample";
if (/* sentence contains word */) {
    /* .. */
}

What is something to use instead of string::find in C++?

  • 7
    You want: char *strstr(const char *s1, const char *s2) -- locates the first occurrence of the string s2 in string s1. – JonH Oct 8 '12 at 15:29
  • @JonH I thought that only works for chars. I will accept one of the answers below, thanks.. – none Oct 8 '12 at 15:37
  • you are mixing that up with strchr. – JonH Oct 8 '12 at 15:48
  • @JonH ahh right, it makes sense now. you're great, thanks again.. – none Oct 8 '12 at 15:59

11 Answers 11

238
if(strstr(sent, word) != NULL) {
    /* ... */
}

Note that strstr returns a pointer to the start of the word in sent if the word word is found.

  • 40
    strstr returns a pointer; I like being explicit when I test for pointers. – nneonneo Oct 8 '12 at 15:31
  • 6
    Ok, my bad thank you for pointing this out for me =D – Simon MILHAU Oct 8 '12 at 15:34
  • 4
    It works because NULL pointer is considered false. – Tomáš Zato May 19 '14 at 18:00
  • 3
    ... and false is 0 – Jack Feb 13 '15 at 2:58
  • 2
    Comment for my future reference; strcasestr does same thing but ignores case. – amonett Jun 5 '15 at 5:58
29

Use strstr for this.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strstr/

So, you'd write it like..

char *sent = "this is my sample example";
char *word = "sample";

char *pch = strstr(sent, word);

if(pch)
{
    ...
}
11

Try to use pointers...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{

  char str[] = "String1 subString1 Strinstrnd subStr ing1subString";
  char sub[] = "subString";

  char *p1, *p2, *p3;
  int i=0,j=0,flag=0;

  p1 = str;
  p2 = sub;

  for(i = 0; i<strlen(str); i++)
  {
    if(*p1 == *p2)
      {
          p3 = p1;
          for(j = 0;j<strlen(sub);j++)
          {
            if(*p3 == *p2)
            {
              p3++;p2++;
            } 
            else
              break;
          }
          p2 = sub;
          if(j == strlen(sub))
          {
             flag = 1;
            printf("\nSubstring found at index : %d\n",i);
          }
      }
    p1++; 
  }
  if(flag==0)
  {
       printf("Substring NOT found");
  }
return (0);
}
6

You can try this one for both finding the presence of the substring and to extract and print it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char mainstring[]="The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    char substring[20], *ret;
    int i=0;
    puts("enter the sub string to find");
    fgets(substring, sizeof(substring), stdin);
    substring[strlen(substring)-1]='\0';
    ret=strstr(mainstring,substring);
    if(strcmp((ret=strstr(mainstring,substring)),substring))
    {
        printf("substring is present\t");
    }
    printf("and the sub string is:::");

    for(i=0;i<strlen(substring);i++)
    {
            printf("%c",*(ret+i));

    }
    puts("\n");
    return 0;
}
  • The test if(strcmp((ret=strstr(mainstring,substring)),substring)) is incorrect: it only matches substring if it is a suffix of mainstring. The rest of the function is a convoluted way to write printf("and the sub string is:::%s\n", substring);. – chqrlie Nov 4 '16 at 21:57
5

This code implements the logic of how search works (one of the ways) without using any ready-made function:

public int findSubString(char[] original, char[] searchString)
{
    int returnCode = 0; //0-not found, -1 -error in imput, 1-found
    int counter = 0;
    int ctr = 0;
    if (original.Length < 1 || (original.Length)<searchString.Length || searchString.Length<1)
    {
        returnCode = -1;
    }

    while (ctr <= (original.Length - searchString.Length) && searchString.Length > 0)
    {
        if ((original[ctr]) == searchString[0])
        {
            counter = 0;
            for (int count = ctr; count < (ctr + searchString.Length); count++)
            {
                if (original[count] == searchString[counter])
                {
                    counter++;
                }
                else
                {
                    counter = 0;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (counter == (searchString.Length))
            {
                returnCode = 1;
            }
        }
        ctr++;
    }
    return returnCode;
}
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – JAL Sep 9 '15 at 20:43
3

And here is how to report the position of the first character off the found substring:

Replace this line in the above code:

printf("%s",substring,"\n");

with:

printf("substring %s was found at position %d \n", substring,((int) (substring - mainstring)));
2

My own humble (case sensitive) solution:

uint8_t strContains(char* string, char* toFind)
{
    uint8_t slen = strlen(string);
    uint8_t tFlen = strlen(toFind);
    uint8_t found = 0;

    if( slen >= tFlen )
    {
        for(uint8_t s=0, t=0; s<slen; s++)
        {
            do{

                if( string[s] == toFind[t] )
                {
                    if( ++found == tFlen ) return 1;
                    s++;
                    t++;
                }
                else { s -= found; found=0; t=0; }

              }while(found);
        }
        return 0;
    }
    else return -1;
}

Results

strContains("this is my sample example", "th") // 1
strContains("this is my sample example", "sample") // 1
strContains("this is my sample example", "xam") // 1
strContains("this is my sample example", "ple") // 1
strContains("this is my sample example", "ssample") // 0
strContains("this is my sample example", "samplee") // 0
strContains("this is my sample example", "") // 0
strContains("str", "longer sentence") // -1
strContains("ssssssample", "sample") // 1
strContains("sample", "sample") // 1

Tested on ATmega328P (avr8-gnu-toolchain-3.5.4.1709) ;)

1

The same will be achived with this simpler code: Why use these:

int main(void)
{

    char mainstring[]="The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    char substring[20];
    int i=0;
    puts("enter the sub stirng to find");
    fgets(substring, sizeof(substring), stdin);
    substring[strlen(substring)-1]='\0';
    if (strstr(mainstring,substring))
    {
            printf("substring is present\t");
    }
    printf("and the sub string is:::");
    printf("%s",substring,"\n");
   return 0;
}

But the tricky part would be to report at which position in original string the substring starts...

1
My code to find out if substring is exist in string or not 
// input ( first line -->> string , 2nd lin ->>> no. of queries for substring
following n lines -->> string to check if substring or not..

#include <stdio.h>
int len,len1;
int isSubstring(char *s, char *sub,int i,int j)
{

        int ans =0;
         for(;i<len,j<len1;i++,j++)
        {
                if(s[i] != sub[j])
                {
                    ans =1;
                    break;
                }
        }
        if(j == len1 && ans ==0)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        else if(ans==1)
            return 0;
return 0;
}
int main(){
    char s[100001];
    char sub[100001];
    scanf("%s", &s);// Reading input from STDIN
    int no;
    scanf("%d",&no);
    int i ,j;
    i=0;
    j=0;
    int ans =0;
    len = strlen(s);
    while(no--)
    {
        i=0;
        j=0;
        ans=0;
        scanf("%s",&sub);
        len1=strlen(sub);
        int value;
        for(i=0;i<len;i++)
        {
                if(s[i]==sub[j])
                {
                    value = isSubstring(s,sub,i,j);
                    if(value)
                    {
                        printf("Yes\n");
                        ans = 1;
                        break;
                    }
                }
        }
        if(ans==0)
            printf("No\n");

    }
}
1

I believe that I have the simplest answer. You don't need the string.h library in this program, nor the stdbool.h library. Simply using pointers and pointer arithmetic will help you become a better C programmer.

Simply return 0 for False (no substring found), or 1 for True (yes, a substring "sub" is found within the overall string "str"):

#include <stdlib.h>

int is_substr(char *str, char *sub)
{
  int num_matches = 0;
  int sub_size = 0;
  // If there are as many matches as there are characters in sub, then a substring exists.
  while (*sub != '\0') {
    sub_size++;
    sub++;
  }

  sub = sub - sub_size;  // Reset pointer to original place.
  while (*str != '\0') {
    while (*sub == *str && *sub != '\0') {
      num_matches++;
      sub++;
      str++;
    }
    if (num_matches == sub_size) {
      return 1;
    }
    num_matches = 0;  // Reset counter to 0 whenever a difference is found. 
    str++;
  }
  return 0;
}
  • 1
    What about buffer overrun? – Cacahuete Frito Mar 18 at 20:14
  • How would buffer overflow occur here? – user9679882 Mar 20 at 17:01
  • To start, you don't know the size of the buffer. Imagine this 'simple' code: char a[3] = "asd"; char b[2] = "as"; is_substr(a, b); Input strings are not NUL-terminated, so you overrun the array. – Cacahuete Frito Mar 20 at 17:31
  • If any of the buffers is of size 0 (arrays of size 0 do not exist, but this is possible, and also legal from the point of view of the user of the function): char a[4] = "asd"; char b[3]= "as"; is_substr(a+4, b); – Cacahuete Frito Mar 20 at 17:36
  • And that's the reason strnstr() exists (at least on libbsd) – Cacahuete Frito Mar 20 at 17:39
-1
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int findSubstr(char *inpText, char *pattern);
int main()
{
    printf("Hello, World!\n");
    char *Text = "This is my sample program";
    char *pattern = "sample";
    int pos = findSubstr(Text, pattern);
    if (pos > -1) {
        printf("Found the substring at position %d \n", pos);
    }
    else
        printf("No match found \n");

    return 0;
}

int findSubstr(char *inpText, char *pattern) {
    int inplen = strlen(inpText);
    while (inpText != NULL) {

        char *remTxt = inpText;
        char *remPat = pattern;

        if (strlen(remTxt) < strlen(remPat)) {
            /* printf ("length issue remTxt %s \nremPath %s \n", remTxt, remPat); */
            return -1;
        }

        while (*remTxt++ == *remPat++) {
            printf("remTxt %s \nremPath %s \n", remTxt, remPat);
            if (*remPat == '\0') {
                printf ("match found \n");
                return inplen - strlen(inpText+1);
            }
            if (remTxt == NULL) {
                return -1;
            }
        }
        remPat = pattern;

        inpText++;
    }
}

protected by nneonneo Mar 29 '16 at 5:50

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.