148

My command keeps timing out, so I need to change the default command timeout value.

I've found myDb.Database.Connection.ConnectionTimeout, but it's readonly.

How can I set the command timeout in Entity Framework 5 ?

  • 18
    FYI, On EF6, Database.CommandTimeout is no longer read-only – itsho Jun 25 '14 at 21:33
  • 1
    @itsho He was talking about Database.Connection.ConnectionTimeout. Anyway, I would say that Database.CommandTimeout is the right thing in the case your query is time-outing (exception System.Data.Entity.Core.EntityCommandExecutionException containing System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: Timeout expired.). – Dawid Ferenczy Rogožan Mar 4 '16 at 14:59
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Entity Framework Timeouts – Tim Pohlmann Dec 1 '16 at 10:05
  • I assume you actually don't care about the CONNECTION timeout, but instead you want to adjust the COMMAND timeout. – Worthy7 Aug 18 '17 at 6:18
185

Try this on your context:

public class MyDatabase : DbContext
{
    public MyDatabase ()
        : base(ContextHelper.CreateConnection("Connection string"), true)
    {
        ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = 180;
    }
}

If you want to define the timeout in the connection string, use the Connection Timeout parameter like in the following connection string:

<connectionStrings>

<add name="AdventureWorksEntities"
connectionString="metadata=.\AdventureWorks.csdl|.\AdventureWorks.ssdl|.\AdventureWorks.msl;
provider=System.Data.SqlClient;provider connection string='Data Source=localhost;
Initial Catalog=AdventureWorks;Integrated Security=True;Connection Timeout=60;
multipleactiveresultsets=true'" providerName="System.Data.EntityClient" />

</connectionStrings>

Source: How to: Define the Connection String

163

You can use DbContext.Database.CommandTimeout = 180;

It's pretty simple and no cast required.

  • 1
    Very useful for us that use Fluent API form of EF. – GoldBishop May 18 '16 at 16:51
  • 1
    Glad I spotted this, I was always (unnecessarily!) wary of the cast. – Phil Cooper Jul 12 '16 at 12:31
  • as for me, it workes even on EF5, thanks! – Fragment Jul 14 '16 at 10:00
20

My partial context looks like:

public partial class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public MyContext (string ConnectionString)
        : base(ConnectionString)
    {
        this.SetCommandTimeOut(300);
    }

    public void SetCommandTimeOut(int Timeout)
    {
        var objectContext = (this as IObjectContextAdapter).ObjectContext;
        objectContext.CommandTimeout = Timeout;
    }
}

I left SetCommandTimeOut public so only the routines I need to take a long time (more than 5 minutes) I modify instead of a global timeout.

9

In the generated constructor code it should call OnContextCreated()

I added this partial class to solve the problem:

partial class MyContext: ObjectContext
{
    partial void OnContextCreated()
    {
        this.CommandTimeout = 300;
    }
}
8

I extended Ronnie's answer with a fluent implementation so you can use it like so:

dm.Context.SetCommandTimeout(120).Database.SqlQuery...

public static class EF
{
    public static DbContext SetCommandTimeout(this DbContext db, TimeSpan? timeout)
    {
        ((IObjectContextAdapter)db).ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = timeout.HasValue ? (int?) timeout.Value.TotalSeconds : null;

        return db;
    }

    public static DbContext SetCommandTimeout(this DbContext db, int seconds)
    {
        return db.SetCommandTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(seconds));
    } 
}
7

Same as other answers, but as an extension method:

static class Extensions
{
    public static void SetCommandTimeout(this IObjectContextAdapter db, TimeSpan? timeout)
    {
        db.ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = timeout.HasValue ? (int?) timeout.Value.TotalSeconds : null;
    }
}
  • and how do i call this extension method? – Wanderson López Feb 16 '18 at 21:39
7

For Database first Aproach:

We can still set it in a constructor, by override the ContextName.Context.tt T4 Template this way:

<#=Accessibility.ForType(container)#> partial class <#=code.Escape(container)#> : DbContext
{
    public <#=code.Escape(container)#>()
        : base("name=<#=container.Name#>")
    {
        Database.CommandTimeout = 180;
<#
if (!loader.IsLazyLoadingEnabled(container))
{
#>
        this.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
<#
}

Database.CommandTimeout = 180; is the acutaly change.

The generated output is this:

public ContextName() : base("name=ContextName")
{
    Database.CommandTimeout = 180;
}

If you change your Database Model, this template stays, but the actualy class will be updated.

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