I am wondering how to write this query.

I know this actual syntax is bogus, but it will help you understand what I am wanting. I need it in this format, because it is part of a much bigger query.

SELECT distributor_id, 
COUNT(*) AS TOTAL, 
COUNT(*) WHERE level = 'exec', 
COUNT(*) WHERE level = 'personal'

I need this all returned in one query.

Also, it need to be in one row, so the following won't work:

'SELECT distributor_id, COUNT(*)
GROUP BY distributor_id'
  • Did this query of you worked properly ?? SELECT distributor_id, COUNT(*) AS TOTAL, COUNT(*) WHERE level = 'exec', COUNT(*) WHERE level = 'personal' – Pratik C Joshi Mar 13 '16 at 8:04
up vote 475 down vote accepted

You can use a CASE statement with an aggregate function. This is basically the same thing as a PIVOT function in some RDBMS:

select distributor_id,
    count(*) total,
    sum(case when level = 'exec' then 1 else 0 end) ExecCount,
    sum(case when level = 'personal' then 1 else 0 end) PersonalCount
from yourtable
group by distributor_id
  • 31
    Fantastic, this is amazing. Great answer. Just a note to people who have stumbled here. Count will count all rows, the sum will do the same thing as a count when used with a case statement. – John Ballinger Jun 1 '14 at 20:46
  • Brilliant solution! It's probably worth noting that this method works just as nicely if you're combining lots of tables together in one query, as using sub-queries can get quite messy in that instance. – Darren Crabb Oct 8 '15 at 11:24
  • 3
    Thanks for this very elegant solution. Btw, this also works with TSQL. – Annie Lagang Sep 9 '16 at 0:52
  • 2
    Why this might not be the best answer: always a full table scan. Consider a join of count-subqueries, or nested counts in a select. However with no indexes present, this might be best as you have guaranteed only one table scan vs multiple. See answer from @KevinBalmforth – YoYo Apr 1 '17 at 19:20
  • @JohnBallinger, 'Count will count all rows' - COUNT will count distributor_id wise . not all the rows of the table, right ? – Istiaque Ahmed Nov 8 '17 at 16:37

One way which works for sure

SELECT a.distributor_id,
    (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE level='personal' and distributor_id = a.distributor_id) as PersonalCount,
    (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE level='exec' and distributor_id = a.distributor_id) as ExecCount,
    (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE distributor_id = a.distributor_id) as TotalCount
FROM (SELECT DISTINCT distributor_id FROM myTable) a ;

EDIT:
See @KevinBalmforth's break down of performance for why you likely don't want to use this method and instead should opt for @bluefeet's answer. I'm leaving this so people can understand their options.

  • This helped me resolve how to do multiple counts and output them in a single SELECT statement with each count being a column. Works great--thanks! – Mark Jan 22 '16 at 21:18
  • Can this be done in Hibernate Criteria ? – Stephane Mar 16 '16 at 12:10
  • I was able to use what you provided here, in a project of mine. Now everything is in a single Query, instead of multiple queries. The page loads in less than a second, compared to 5-8 seconds with multiple queries. Love it. Thanks, Notme. – Wayne Barron Mar 13 '17 at 2:42
  • This might work well if each sub query actually hits an index. If not, then sum(case...) solution should be considered. – YoYo Apr 1 '17 at 19:23
  • Note that as an alternative to distinct, as I have made the correction, you can also/better use group by with the benefit of replacing an entire nested query with a simple count(*) as @Mihai shows - with further MySQL only syntax simplifications. – YoYo Apr 1 '17 at 19:29
SELECT 
    distributor_id, 
    COUNT(*) AS TOTAL, 
    COUNT(IF(level='exec',1,null)),
    COUNT(IF(level='personal',1,null))
FROM sometable;

COUNT only counts non null values and the DECODE will return non null value 1 only if your condition is satisfied.

  • 3
    I'm pretty sure decode is oracle specific – NotMe Oct 8 '12 at 21:07
  • @ChrisLively that is correct. – Majid Laissi Oct 8 '12 at 21:10
  • which distributor_id will the query show ? It shows 1 row in total. – Istiaque Ahmed Nov 8 '17 at 18:20
  • The OP has a group by on the column that was omitted in my answer. – Majid Laissi Nov 8 '17 at 18:25

For mysql this can be shorten to

select distributor_id,
    count(*) total,
    sum(level = 'exec') ExecCount,
    sum(level = 'personal') PersonalCount
from yourtable
group by distributor_id
  • was "group by distributor_id""really necessary in this query? It can work without that as well – user1451111 Nov 27 '17 at 7:20
  • @user1451111 original question got it so it is answer depends on the question itself – Al-Mothafar Oct 9 at 9:49

Building on other posted answers.

Both of these will produce the right values:

select distributor_id,
    count(*) total,
    sum(case when level = 'exec' then 1 else 0 end) ExecCount,
    sum(case when level = 'personal' then 1 else 0 end) PersonalCount
from yourtable
group by distributor_id

SELECT a.distributor_id,
          (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE level='personal' and distributor_id = a.distributor_id) as PersonalCount,
          (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE level='exec' and distributor_id = a.distributor_id) as ExecCount,
          (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE distributor_id = a.distributor_id) as TotalCount
       FROM myTable a ; 

However, the performance is quite different, which will obviously be more relevant as the quantity of data grows.

I found that, assuming no indexes were defined on the table, the query using the SUMs would do a single table scan, while the query with the COUNTs would do multiple table scans.

As an example, run the following script:

IF OBJECT_ID (N't1', N'U') IS NOT NULL 
drop table t1

create table t1 (f1 int)


    insert into t1 values (1) 
    insert into t1 values (1) 
    insert into t1 values (2)
    insert into t1 values (2)
    insert into t1 values (2)
    insert into t1 values (3)
    insert into t1 values (3)
    insert into t1 values (3)
    insert into t1 values (3)
    insert into t1 values (4)
    insert into t1 values (4)
    insert into t1 values (4)
    insert into t1 values (4)
    insert into t1 values (4)


SELECT SUM(CASE WHEN f1 = 1 THEN 1 else 0 end),
SUM(CASE WHEN f1 = 2 THEN 1 else 0 end),
SUM(CASE WHEN f1 = 3 THEN 1 else 0 end),
SUM(CASE WHEN f1 = 4 THEN 1 else 0 end)
from t1

SELECT 
(select COUNT(*) from t1 where f1 = 1),
(select COUNT(*) from t1 where f1 = 2),
(select COUNT(*) from t1 where f1 = 3),
(select COUNT(*) from t1 where f1 = 4)

Highlight the 2 SELECT statements and click on the Display Estimated Execution Plan icon. You will see that the first statement will do one table scan and the second will do 4. Obviously one table scan is better than 4.

Adding a clustered index is also interesting. E.g.

Create clustered index t1f1 on t1(f1);
Update Statistics t1;

The first SELECT above will do a single Clustered Index Scan. The second SELECT will do 4 Clustered Index Seeks, but they are still more expensive than a single Clustered Index Scan. I tried the same thing on a table with 8 million rows and the second SELECT was still a lot more expensive.

Well, if you must have it all in one query, you could do a union:

SELECT distributor_id, COUNT() FROM ... UNION
SELECT COUNT() AS EXEC_COUNT FROM ... WHERE level = 'exec' UNION
SELECT COUNT(*) AS PERSONAL_COUNT FROM ... WHERE level = 'personal';

Or, if you can do after processing:

SELECT distributor_id, COUNT(*) FROM ... GROUP BY level;

You will get the count for each level and need to sum them all up to get the total.

  • Found UNION to be very helpful when generating a report containing multiple instances of the COUNT(*) function. – James O Sep 22 '15 at 20:48
  • The result shows #1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MariaDB server version for the right syntax to use near ') FROM distributors UNION SELECT COUNT() AS EXEC_COUNT FROM distributors WHERE ' at line 1. – Istiaque Ahmed Nov 8 '17 at 16:47
  • number of columns returned from all queries, on which a UNION is applied, should be equal. @IstiaqueAhmed probably that is the reason behind your error. – user1451111 Jun 10 at 13:25
  • A note for anyone who stumble upon this answer in future. The 'After Processing' technique described here may cause issue when some of the values in 'level' columns are NULL. In that case the sum of all the sub-counts will not be equal to the total row count. – user1451111 Jun 10 at 13:55

I do something like this where I just give each table a string name to identify it in column A, and a count for column. Then I union them all so they stack. The result is pretty in my opinion - not sure how efficient it is compared to other options but it got me what I needed.

select 'table1', count (*) from table1
union select 'table2', count (*) from table2
union select 'table3', count (*) from table3
union select 'table4', count (*) from table4
union select 'table5', count (*) from table5
union select 'table6', count (*) from table6
union select 'table7', count (*) from table7;

Result:

-------------------
| String  | Count |
-------------------
| table1  | 123   |
| table2  | 234   |
| table3  | 345   |
| table4  | 456   |
| table5  | 567   |
-------------------
  • How could you get so many tables ? – Istiaque Ahmed Nov 10 '17 at 12:22
  • a query that I created makes ...- where is that query ? – Istiaque Ahmed Nov 10 '17 at 12:30
  • how to add where caluse to all tables – user9260670 Apr 29 at 6:53

Based on Bluefeet's accepted response with an added nuance using OVER ()

select distributor_id,
    count(*) total,
    sum(case when level = 'exec' then 1 else 0 end) OVER() ExecCount,
    sum(case when level = 'personal' then 1 else 0 end) OVER () PersonalCount
from yourtable
group by distributor_id

Using OVER() with nothing in the () will give you the total count for the whole dataset.

I think this can also works for you select count(*) as anc,(select count(*) from Patient where sex='F')as patientF,(select count(*) from Patient where sex='M') as patientM from anc

and also you can select and count related tables like this select count(*) as anc,(select count(*) from Patient where Patient.Id=anc.PatientId)as patientF,(select count(*) from Patient where sex='M') as patientM from anc

protected by Maxim Mar 22 at 7:14

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