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Possible Duplicate:
C Macro definition to determine big endian or little endian machine?

int main()
{
  int x = 1;

  char *y = (char*)&x;

  printf("%c\n",*y+48);
}

If it's little endian it will print 1. If it's big endian it will print 0. Is that correct? Or will setting a char* to int x always point to the least significant bit, regardless of endianness?

6
  • 1
    See this answer, it may be related. – Sergey Kalinichenko Oct 9 '12 at 1:59
  • @ordinary - Just a note that big endian and little endian are not the only options, that not all data types need to have the same endianness, and that some hardware can be configured at runtime. If you really need to check this, you might have to check more things. – Bo Persson Oct 9 '12 at 7:55
  • If you have the option, consider bitwise operations on fixed width datatypes to extract/set bits. They are portable according to this answer – mucaho Jul 30 '15 at 3:33
  • Great endianness demo code for userland and even a kernel module: gitlab.com/eric.saintetienne/endianness – Eric Apr 15 '20 at 11:10
  • Why use ASCII. Use '0'. Why print as a char and not an int. Why start as an int. – young_souvlaki Jul 7 '20 at 13:52
115

In short, yes.

Suppose we are on a 32-bit machine.

If it is little endian, the x in the memory will be something like:

       higher memory
          ----->
    +----+----+----+----+
    |0x01|0x00|0x00|0x00|
    +----+----+----+----+
    A
    |
   &x

so (char*)(&x) == 1, and *y+48 == '1'.

If it is big endian, it will be:

    +----+----+----+----+
    |0x00|0x00|0x00|0x01|
    +----+----+----+----+
    A
    |
   &x

so this one will be '0'.

6
  • 1
    What is the significance of the value 48 added to y? – Abin Mathew Abraham Feb 1 '16 at 15:57
  • 16
    @AbinMathewAbraham 48 is the ascii code of '0' :) – Marcus Feb 18 '16 at 8:37
  • I am using MAC OS with intel processors. It is supposed to be Little Endian. However, 1 seems to be a special case because when 1 is stored inside the memory, it is in big endian. – code4j Mar 7 '16 at 14:25
  • 2
    Can you tell me why we can't just use (char)x == 1 ? Why do we have to get the address, convert it to a char pointer and then dereference? Won't this be implicitly done (char)x is used? – J...S Dec 28 '18 at 11:57
  • 2
    @J...S I believe (char)x would work regardless of endianness. And by "work", I mean it would assign the value 1 to x, so it wouldn't be possible to detect the endianness this way. – luizfls Aug 22 '19 at 17:59
25

The following will do.

unsigned int x = 1;
printf ("%d", (int) (((char *)&x)[0]));

And setting &x to char * will enable you to access the individual bytes of the integer, and the ordering of bytes will depend on the endianness of the system.

1
  • 2
    No need to declare as unsigned int. signed int also will do because 1 is positive and even if one bit is reserved for sign, it will be 0 anyway for positive numbers. – kadina Jul 6 '16 at 22:01
16

This is big endian test from a configure script:

#include <inttypes.h>
int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    volatile uint32_t i=0x01234567;
    // return 0 for big endian, 1 for little endian.
    return (*((uint8_t*)(&i))) == 0x67;
}
3
  • Why volatile instead of const? – LIU Qingyuan Oct 10 '20 at 8:34
  • I think it is an easy way to avoid any undesired compiler optimization, and actually look at the data in the ram cell to determine the answer. – FamZheng Oct 11 '20 at 18:52
  • thx, optimization must be suppressed here. – LIU Qingyuan Oct 13 '20 at 3:09
10

Thought I knew I had read about that in the standard; but can't find it. Keeps looking. Old; answering heading; not Q-tex ;P:


The following program would determine that:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int is_big_endian(void)
{
    union {
        uint32_t i;
        char c[4];
    } e = { 0x01000000 };

    return e.c[0];
}

int main(void)
{
    printf("System is %s-endian.\n",
        is_big_endian() ? "big" : "little");

    return 0;
}

You also have this approach; from Quake II:

byte    swaptest[2] = {1,0};
if ( *(short *)swaptest == 1) {
    bigendien = false;

And !is_big_endian() is not 100% to be little as it can be mixed/middle.

Believe this can be checked using same approach only change value from 0x01000000 to i.e. 0x01020304 giving:

switch(e.c[0]) {
case 0x01: BIG
case 0x02: MIX
default: LITTLE

But not entirely sure about that one ...

5
  • aren't you forgetting ==1 after e.c[0] – Nate-Wilkins Oct 9 '12 at 2:32
  • @Nate: 1 == 1, 1 != 0, !!1 or 1 is the same. Or am I missing something here? – user1668559 Oct 9 '12 at 2:41
  • Hmm not sure... This isn't my forte. I saw a similar operation but it had the ==1 at the end. So I'm not sure. – Nate-Wilkins Oct 9 '12 at 13:55
  • @Nate: Yes. Probably using something like e = { 0x01020304 }; Then a.c[0] == 1 would be needed as a.c[0] would be 1 or 4 on big- vs little. – user1668559 Oct 9 '12 at 14:31
  • Ah yea that would be it. – Nate-Wilkins Oct 9 '12 at 14:35

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