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The script I'm working on is designed to update a database table which records the country of use and the status of all IP addresses (or almost all of them). Currently I'm keeping it simple and am only fetching data from the 5 RIRs (Regional Internet Registries) and saving that to my database.

Initially the speeds were impractical but they have been improved signficantly by reducing the amount of information in the log and grouping the SQL inserts into groups of 1000 and using a single query. However, when running the script now I get very large variations in the speed of the SQL inserts and I was wondering if anyone knew why.

Here are the some of the speeds I've recorded. In the test I separated out the time taken to execute the iterations of the script in PHP and the time taken to apply the sql statement, I've not included the PHP times in the list below as the effect was negligible; no more than 1 second for even the largest blocks of data.

Test Speeds (number of data rows being inserted remains the same throughout)

Test 1 Total SQL executing time: 33 seconds

Test 2 Total SQL executing time: 72 seconds

Test 3 Total SQL executing time: 78 seconds

Other tests continued to fluctuate between ~30 seconds and ~80 seconds.

I have two questions:

1) Should I accept these disparities as the way of the world, or is there a reason for them?

2) I felt nervous about lumping the ~185000 row inserts into one query. Is there any reason I should avoid using one query for these inserts? I've not worked with this amount of data being saved at one time before.

Thank you

__

The database table is as follows.

Sorage Engine - InnoDB

Columns:

id - int, primary key

registry - varchar(7)

code - varchar(2)

type - varchar(4)

start - varchar(15)

value - int

date - datetime

status - varchar(10)

  • There is a configurable maximum length for commands in MySQL - the standard is abount 1 MB. With 185k rows you might hit this limit. You can raise it of course, and i don't know why you should not. – Argeman Oct 9 '12 at 10:04
  • i assume you use standard innodb table type? – Argeman Oct 9 '12 at 10:05
  • 80 seconds for an insert, even 1000 rows, sounds very long. I often break into groups of 100 and they happen quickly enough ("instantly"ish) that I've never worried - I would expect similar with 1000 rows. Factors that could slow it down - network traffic (but not 80 seconds work), too many indexes (again, not accounting for enough time), and triggers (do you have any?). But you should be getting much, much faster than that - I would dig deeper. But compare 100 vs 1000 vs 10,000 before you plump for the lot! – Robbie Oct 9 '12 at 10:09
  • yes, it uses innodb . – Marvin Oct 9 '12 at 10:40
  • @Robbie the time for the SQL refers to all insert statements that the script runs (which is about 185 queries with each query containing about 1000 inserts). The table is quite simple and small, I'll edit my question to give details of the table setup. – Marvin Oct 9 '12 at 10:41
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1) Should I accept these disparities as the way of the world, or is there a reason for them?

Variations in speed may be due to competing processes using the disk-IO - so waiting for resources. If this is a production server not a lonely testing server then certainly some other processes are requesting access to the disk.

2) I felt nervous about lumping the ~185000 row inserts into one query. Is there any reason I should avoid using one query for these inserts? I've not worked with this amount of data being saved at one time before.

You should also divide the inserts into groups of X inserts, and insert each group as a transaction.

Determining the value of X some other way except experimentally is hard.

Grouping inserts into transactions ensures data is written (committed) to disk only after each transaction not after each (auto committed) insert.

This has a good effect on disk-IO and if you group to many inserts into one transaction it can have a bad effect on available memory. If the amount of uncommitted data is too big for current memory the DBMS will start writing the data to an internal log (on disk).

So X depends on the number of inserts, the amount of data associated with each insert, the allowed memory/user/session parameters. And many other things.


There are some cool (free) tools from percona. They help you monitor DB activity.

You can also look at vmstat watch -n .5 'vmstat'

See the amount and variation of data being written to disk by the activities of the production environment.

Start your script up and wait until you notice a step up in the number of bytes being written to disk. If writing the step up is pretty much a constant value (above the normal production use) then it's thrashing & swapping, if it's rhythmical then it's only writing for commits.

  • AFAIK binary logging is an option. It is indeed used by replication setups when they are using binary replication techniques. – Mihai Stancu Oct 9 '12 at 12:19
  • Thank you very much. It is a production server, so it makes sense - I'm happy as long as I have some idea why the results are varying. I was using groups of 1000 inserts per sql statement, but I've now increased that to 10000 since the data in each row is so small. I'll try and monitor the resource usage for this though. Thanks again. – Marvin Oct 9 '12 at 12:20

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