I've tried the example from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitudinal_redundancy_check

This is the code for lrc (C#):

/// <summary>
/// Longitudinal Redundancy Check (LRC) calculator for a byte array. 
/// ex) DATA (hex 6 bytes): 02 30 30 31 23 03
///     LRC  (hex 1 byte ): EC    
/// </summary> 
public static byte calculateLRC(byte[] bytes)
{
    byte LRC = 0x00;
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        LRC = (LRC + bytes[i]) & 0xFF; 
    }
    return ((LRC ^ 0xFF) + 1) & 0xFF;
}   

It said the result is "EC" but I get "71", what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks.

  • 3
    That shouldn't even compile. Math on a byte turns it into an int. – harold Oct 9 '12 at 11:41
  • 3
    What if Wikipedia is wrong? The C# appears to have been changed many times, changing the algorithm used as well (it used to be a simple xor of all bytes, which, by the way, doesn't give EC as the answer either). – harold Oct 9 '12 at 11:51
  • Also, you can only get 71 from this code with this input by writing the result in decimal, in which case you'd never see EC even if you get that as the answer (you'd see 236) – harold Oct 9 '12 at 11:57
  • 1
    It might be worth noting that the term LRC itself is ambiguous, being used by different people to describe two different algorithms: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3ALongitudinal_redundancy_check. If you're looking to check for corrupt bytes then the XOR algorithm is the simplest and should do the trick. Further, clearly Wikipedia is incorrect in either the algorithm or the expected result. – Mike Chamberlain Oct 9 '12 at 12:07
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's a cleaned up version that doesn't do all those useless operations (instead of discarding the high bits every time, they're discarded all at once in the end), and it gives the result you observed. This is the version that uses addition, but that has a negation at the end - might as well subtract and skip the negation. That's a valid transformation even in the case of overflow.

public static byte calculateLRC(byte[] bytes)
{
    int LRC = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        LRC -= bytes[i];
    }
    return (byte)LRC;
}

Here's the alternative LRC (a simple xor of bytes)

public static byte calculateLRC(byte[] bytes)
{
    byte LRC = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        LRC ^= bytes[i];
    }
    return LRC;
}

And Wikipedia is simply wrong in this case, both in the code (doesn't compile) and in the expected result.

  • OK thank you all – Alexx Perez Oct 9 '12 at 13:25
  • @AlexxPerez Maybe neither of these methods.. does it really not document what kind of LRC it uses? – harold Oct 9 '12 at 13:54
  • Maybe it uses the xor method and skips the first byte, you'd get 4B. – harold Oct 9 '12 at 13:55
  • yes it is. xor method without stx byte. thank you. – Alexx Perez Oct 9 '12 at 17:39

Guess this one looks cooler ;)

public static byte calculateLRC(byte[] bytes)
{
    return bytes.Aggregate<byte, byte>(0, (x, y) => (byte) (x^ y));
}

If someone wants to get the LRC char from a string:

    public static char CalculateLRC(string toEncode)
    {
        byte[] bytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(toEncode);
        byte LRC = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
        {
            LRC ^= bytes[i];
        }
        return Convert.ToChar(LRC);
    }

The corrected Wikipedia version is as follows:

private byte calculateLRC(byte[] b)
    {
        byte lrc = 0x00;
        for (int i = 0; i < b.Length; i++)
        {
            lrc = (byte)((lrc + b[i]) & 0xFF);
        }
        lrc = (byte)(((lrc ^ 0xff) + 2) & 0xFF);
        return lrc;
    }
  • I know this is a bit of a necro-comment, but some of those operations are not necessary. For example, in addition, the lower bits of the result do not depend on the higher ones, so you don't need to do the & 0xff for every byte, you can do it once in the end without changing the result. Casting to byte even makes the last & 0xff redundant. – harold Oct 9 '13 at 11:31

I realize that this question pretty old, but I had trouble figuring out how to do this. It's working now, so I figured I should paste the code. In my case, the checksum needs to return as an ASCII string.

public function getLrc($string)
{
    $LRC = 0;
    // Get hex checksum.
    foreach (str_split($string, 1) as $char) {
        $LRC ^= ord($char);
    }
    $hex = dechex($LRC);
    // convert hex to string
    $str = '';
    for($i=0;$i<strlen($hex);$i+=2) $str .= chr(hexdec(substr($hex,$i,2)));
    return $str;
}
  • This example is php, the question is C# – tricknology Oct 6 '16 at 0:29

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