How can I avoid that a code line like:

((EditText) findViewById(R.id.MyEditText)).setText("Hello");

Will cause an event here:

((EditText) findViewById(R.id.MyEditText)).addTextChangedListener(new TextWatcher() {
@Override
public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start,
    int before, int count) {
// HERE
}

@Override
public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start,
    int count, int after) {
}

@Override
public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {
}
});

I want to know if there is any way to inhibit the execution of onTextChanged as I noticed in the case of selecting a AutoCompleteTextView's dropdown result (no onTextChanged is executed!).

I'm not seeking for workarounds like "if hello do nothing"...

up vote 23 down vote accepted
+50

The Source for AutoCompleteTextView shows that they set a boolean to say the text is being replaced by the block completion

         mBlockCompletion = true;
         replaceText(convertSelectionToString(selectedItem));
         mBlockCompletion = false;    

This is as good a way as any to achieve what you want to do. The TextWatcher then checks to to see if the setText has come via a completion and returns out of the method

 void doBeforeTextChanged() {
     if (mBlockCompletion) return;

Adding and removing the TextWatcher will be more time consuming for the application

You can check which View has the focus currently to distinguish between user and program triggered events.

EditText myEditText = (EditText) findViewById(R.id.myEditText);

myEditText.addTextChangedListener(new TextWatcher() {
    @Override
    public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {

        if(getCurrentFocus() == myEditText) {
            // is only executed if the EditText was directly changed by the user
        }
    }

    //...
});

An alternative way to achieve this would be to use setOnKeyListener.

This will only trigger when the user presses a key rather than whenever the EditText is changed by the user OR programmatically.

myEditText.setOnKeyListener(new EditText.OnKeyListener() {
    public boolean onKey(View v, int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
        switch(event.getAction()) {
            case KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
                // beforeTextChanged
                break;      
            case KeyEvent.ACTION_UP:
                // afterTextChanged
                break;
        }
        return false;
    }
});

I don't think there is an easy way to disable the listener, but you can get around it by either:

  • Removing the TextWatcher before you set the text, and adding it back after.
  • Or set a boolean flag before you set the text, which tells the TextWatcher to ignore it.

E.g.

boolean ignoreNextTextChange = true;
((EditText) findViewById(R.id.MyEditText)).setText("Hello");

And in your TextWatcher:

new TextWatcher() {
    @Override
    public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {
        /*
        If the flag is set to ignore the next text change,
        reset the flag, and return without doing anything.
        */
        if (ignoreNextTextChange){
            ignoreNextTextChange = false;
            return;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {

    }

    @Override
    public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {

    }
});

It's a little hacky, but it should work :)

  • Will returning there prevent execution of before and after text changed too, or would you need another boolean check there? – Menasheh Jul 15 '16 at 21:19

Alternatively you can simply use mEditText.hasFocus() to distinguish between Text that human-changed or program-changed, this works fine for me:

@Override
public void onTextChanged(CharSequence charSequence, int i, int i2, int i3) {
    if (mEditText.hasFocus()) {
        // Do whatever
    }
}

Hope this helps!

Only two ways I can see

  • you check within the listener
  • you add/remove the listener according to certain conditions

As the first way is a unwanted workaround for you I am a afraid you have work around with the second way.

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