63

How to add a method to a base type, say Array? In the global module this will be recognized

interface Array {
   remove(o): Array;
}

but where to put the actual implementation?

1
107

You can use the prototype to extend Array:

interface Array<T> {
    remove(o: T): Array<T>;
}

Array.prototype.remove = function (o) {
    // code to remove "o"
    return this;
}

If you are within a module, you will need to make it clear that you are referring to the global Array<T>, not creating a local Array<T> interface within your module:

declare global {
    interface Array<T> {
        remove(o: T): Array<T>;
    }
}
Is this answer outdated?
|
7
  • 1
    @FrancoisVanderseypen that could be a pain, I suggest you don't try it. It is easier the way proposed here. But if you are curious: stackoverflow.com/a/14001136/340760 – BrunoLM Dec 22 '13 at 19:41
  • it should be interface Array<T> { remove(o): T[]; } in new version with generics – Mariusz Pawelski Feb 9 '14 at 0:04
  • @SteveFenton Hmm, can you elaborate? I can do such things in regular Node modules, why TypeScript forbids that? Do you know any workarounds? – Gill Bates Sep 14 '15 at 7:40
  • 1
    Definitions must be at the same level in order to take effect, so if you are in a module and you declare interface Array<T> that is a member of the module, i.e. MyModule.Array<T>. That means the global Array<T> is not extended, but a new local interface is created. You have to put extensions in the global scope... I'd suggest putting the interface in a .d.ts file. Do you also need to patch the array definition or is it just the interface? – Fenton Sep 14 '15 at 9:54
  • Hi, sorry to bump but where should I put this code in an angular 2 (ionic 2) app ? In a provider's constructor ? – Louis Mar 28 '17 at 9:04
58

declare global seems to be the ticket as of TypeScript 2.1. Note that Array.prototype is of type any[], so if you want to have your function implementation checked for consistency, best to add a generic type parameter yourself.

declare global {
  interface Array<T> {
    remove(elem: T): Array<T>;
  }
}

if (!Array.prototype.remove) {
  Array.prototype.remove = function<T>(this: T[], elem: T): T[] {
    return this.filter(e => e !== elem);
  }
}
Is this answer outdated?
|
4
  • 1
    This does the trick, expect inside the function this will be any[], not T[]. Does anyone know why? Is there a workaround? – Nikola Mihajlović Sep 28 '18 at 4:59
  • 2
    I added an explicit type to the this parameter based on your question. See the "this parameters" section of typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/functions.html. – Rikki Gibson Sep 28 '18 at 21:53
  • 1
    Genius! Thanks so much Rikki Gibson! – Nikola Mihajlović Sep 30 '18 at 22:31
  • So how do you import this into another .ts file? – Sprotty Sep 25 '20 at 14:09
12

Adding to Rikki Gibson's answer,

export{}
declare global {
    interface Array<T> {
        remove(elem: T): Array<T>;
    }
}

if (!Array.prototype.remove) {
  Array.prototype.remove = function<T>(elem: T): T[] {
      return this.filter(e => e !== elem);
  }
}

Without the export{} TS error "Augmentations for the global scope can only be directly nested in external modules or ambient module declarations."

Is this answer outdated?
|
2
  • 1
    How can we import this? Does "import * as array_extensions" work? or Is there any way to import just some of extension functions? – Saleh Sep 23 '20 at 11:08
  • 1
    @Saleh Use import "./array_extensions" – grian Jan 1 at 8:54
6

From TypeScript 1.6, you can "natively" extend arbitrary expressions like inbuilt types.

What's new in TypeScript:

TypeScript 1.6 adds support for classes extending arbitrary expression that computes a constructor function. This means that built-in types can now be extended in class declarations.

The extends clause of a class previously required a type reference to be specified. It now accepts an expression optionally followed by a type argument list. The type of the expression must be a constructor function type with at least one construct signature that has the same number of type parameters as the number of type arguments specified in the extends clause. The return type of the matching construct signature(s) is the base type from which the class instance type inherits. Effectively, this allows both real classes and "class-like" expressions to be specified in the extends clause.

// Extend built-in types

class MyArray extends Array<number> { }
class MyError extends Error { }

// Extend computed base class

class ThingA {
    getGreeting() { return "Hello from A"; }
}

class ThingB {
    getGreeting() { return "Hello from B"; }
}

interface Greeter {
    getGreeting(): string;
}

interface GreeterConstructor {
    new (): Greeter;
}

function getGreeterBase(): GreeterConstructor {
    return Math.random() >= 0.5 ? ThingA : ThingB;
}

class Test extends getGreeterBase() {
    sayHello() {
        console.log(this.getGreeting());
    }
}
Is this answer outdated?
|
2
3
class MyArray<T> extends Array<T> {
    remove: (elem: T) => Array<T> = function(elem: T) {
        return this.filter(e => e !== elem);
    }
}
let myArr = new MyArray<string>();
myArr.remove("some");

this works for me with typescript v2.2.1!

Is this answer outdated?
|
2
  • 6
    This problem with this approach is that now every array has to be of the type MyArray, so it won't work seamlessly with other libraries that return arrays. – Jan Aagaard Jul 18 '18 at 20:59
  • 3
    The question was how to extend Array.prototype not just class inheritance – Pavel Nazarov Jul 30 '20 at 13:19
-1

I just had to do the same and created a generic function that includes a mapping.

getDistinctValuesFromArray<T,R>(array: T[], mapping: (values: T) => R): R[] {
    return Array.from([...new Set(array.map(mapping))]);
}

You can call it then like: getDistinctValuesFromArray<ArrayType, ElementType>(yourArray, a => a.elem) To make it concrete I like to add the specific types like ArrayType and ElementType. Those you need to replace for sure with your types.

Is this answer outdated?
|
1
  • This does not add a method to the base type, it is a normal function – Javi Marzán Jan 15 at 11:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.