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In a simple example, I'm confused about how to turn this grammar into a LL one by removing the left recursion. Any hints are welcome.

G = {
      A -> A a | A B | a
      B -> b
    }

I get the following by applying this algorithm:

G = {
      A -> a X
      X -> e | A | B X
      B -> b
    }

This seem to work to generate a C pseudo-code for the parser:

void A() {
    switch (token) {
        case 'a' : next(); X(); break;
    }
}

void X() {
    switch (token) {
        case 'e' : finish(); break;
        case 'a' : A(); break;
        case 'b' : B(); X(); break;
    }
}

void B() {
    next();
}

And to generate a parsing tree for the word: aabab:

A ---+
|    |
a    X
     |
     A ---+
     |    |
     a    X ---+
          |    |
          B    X
          |    |
          b    A ---+
               |    |
               a    X ---+
                    |    |
                    B    X
                    |    |
                    b    e

Well, I'm just not sure if it's right...

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, your grammar seems to accept sequences of as separated by single bs, so that no 2 b come together. (aaa...abaaaaa...abaaa...a) This should be equivalent to something like:

Q -> P | P b P
P -> a | a P
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for not saying. I need to maintain some structure of the original grammar. Take a look at the edit. =D – vmassuchetto Oct 10 '12 at 14:54
    
@Vinicius: well, the grammar you've presented (the second one) seems to be correct. The only changes in the pseudocode would be (1) default case in switches, producing an error, (2) 'e' should be not a character but EOF or whatever marks the end of the input stream. – Vlad Oct 10 '12 at 15:00

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