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I'm trying to learn Socket by myself. I'm little bit confused by following text from Oracle website. I have some questions regarding that. Thanks in advance for any clear explanation.

setSoTimeout

public void setSoTimeout(int timeout) throws SocketException

Enable/disable SO_TIMEOUT with the specified timeout, in milliseconds. With this option set to a non-zero timeout, a read() call on the InputStream associated with this Socket will block for only this amount of time. If the timeout expires, a java.net.SocketTimeoutException is raised, though the Socket is still valid. The option must be enabled prior to entering the blocking operation to have effect. The timeout must be > 0. A timeout of zero is interpreted as an infinite timeout.

  1. What is SO_TIMEOUT?
  2. Socket is the endpoint of a connection. If I say

    mySocket.setSoTimeout(2000);
    

    Does it mean that I'm blocking reading any input from the Server/Client for this socket for 2000 millisecond and after this time the socket is ready to read data?

  3. What does it mean timeout expire?

  4. What is the option which must be enabled prior to blocking operation?

  5. Infinite Timeout means that the socket does't read anymore?

30

The JavaDoc explains it very well:

With this option set to a non-zero timeout, a read() call on the InputStream associated with this Socket will block for only this amount of time. If the timeout expires, a java.net.SocketTimeoutException is raised, though the Socket is still valid. The option must be enabled prior to entering the blocking operation to have effect. The timeout must be > 0. A timeout of zero is interpreted as an infinite timeout.

SO_TIMEOUT is the timeout that a read() call will block. If the timeout is reached, a java.net.SocketTimeoutException will be thrown. If you want to block forever put this option to zero (the default value), then the read() call will block until at least 1 byte could be read.

  • Thanks for your reply but I still don't know what does it mean the timeout expires? Does it mean that the expected time passed. For instance: mySocket.setSoTimeout(2000); mySocket will be expired after 2000 millisecond? So always timeout will be expire except the zero situation? – Bernard Oct 10 '12 at 14:05
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    I just find it weird that setSoTimeout is named as setSoTimeout and not setSocketTimeout, why? – tom_mai78101 Nov 19 '12 at 13:29
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    @tom_mai78101 sometimes, methods are shortened to avoid long names. – logoff Nov 20 '12 at 8:04
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    The setSoTimeout() method is obviously named after the SO_TIMEOUT option. It sets SO_TIMEOUT. – user207421 May 6 '13 at 12:40
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    Does this value ONLY apply to if no data has been received on the socket? What about a long running read? FYI I have a service call that I want to make sure it doesn't take any longer than 2 seconds. Is the only way to do that to create a thread that monitors the request? – Kevin M Apr 10 '14 at 16:12
36

Does it mean that I'm blocking reading any input from the Server/Client for this socket for 2000 millisecond and after this time the socket is ready to read data?

No, it means that if no data arrives within 2000ms a SocketTimeoutException will be thrown.

What does it mean timeout expire?

It means the 2000ms (in your case) elapses without any data arriving.

What is the option which must be enabled prior to blocking operation?

There isn't one that 'must be' enabled. If you mean 'may be enabled', this is one of them.

Infinite Timeout menas that the socket does't read anymore?

What a strange suggestion. It means that if no data ever arrives you will block in the read forever.

  • Nice answer, though the sockets API does not have an SO_TIMEOUT socket option. The implementation is not so straightforward. – Joni May 27 '13 at 10:41
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    Typo? Not really, SO_TIMEOUT is an abstraction over OS-specific mechanisms. On Unix systems the JVM uses poll or select. On Windows it uses the Windows-only SO_RCVTIMEO socket option. – Joni May 27 '13 at 12:24
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    EJP, this question is about the SO_TIMEOUT option in the Java socket API. If you study how it is implemented (at least in OpenJDK) you'll see that the Windows implementation uses SO_RCVTIMEO, while the Linux/Solaris implementation uses poll or select to achieve the same effect. Compare hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk7/jdk7-gate/jdk/file/9b8c96f96a0f/src/… and hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk7/jdk7-gate/jdk/file/9b8c96f96a0f/src/… – Joni May 30 '13 at 9:57
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    @Joni You're the one who started this name game, let's finish it accurately. There is no 'SO_TIMEOUT option in the Java Socket API. There is a Socket.setSoTimeout() method, whose Javadoc inaccurately refers to SO_TIMEOUT, which as you correctly said in your first comment is non-existent. I'm aware of how it's implemented and I'm aware of the reasons why. – user207421 May 31 '13 at 11:21
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    There's no reason why SO_TIMEOUT must be implemented using SO_RCVTIMEO. If you read the OpenJDK 7 source code you'll find this comment: SO_TIMEOUT is the socket option used to specify the timeout for ServerSocket.accept and Socket.getInputStream().read. It does not typically map to a native level socket option. For Windows we special-case this and use the SOL_SOCKET/SO_RCVTIMEO socket option to specify a receive timeout on the socket. On Linux and Solaris they use poll instead. If you don't see the point in discussing how SO_TIMEOUT is implemented why do you bring up SO_RCVTIMEO? – Joni Oct 19 '13 at 10:41
12

This example made everything clear for me:
As you can see setSoTimeout prevent the program to hang! It wait for SO_TIMEOUT time! if it does not get any signal it throw exception! It means that time expired!

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.SocketTimeoutException;

public class SocketTest extends Thread {
  private ServerSocket serverSocket;

  public SocketTest() throws IOException {
    serverSocket = new ServerSocket(8008);
    serverSocket.setSoTimeout(10000);
  }

  public void run() {
    while (true) {
      try {
        System.out.println("Waiting for client on port " + serverSocket.getLocalPort() + "...");
        Socket client = serverSocket.accept();

        System.out.println("Just connected to " + client.getRemoteSocketAddress());
        client.close();
      } catch (SocketTimeoutException s) {
        System.out.println("Socket timed out!");
        break;
      } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        break;
      }
    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
      Thread t = new SocketTest();
      t.start();
    } catch (IOException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}
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    It is exactly what I have explained in my response... Anyway, I am happy because you finally understand the purpose of this socket option ;.)) – logoff Oct 10 '12 at 14:40
  • It is also exactly what it says in the Javadoc. – user207421 Oct 11 '12 at 0:38

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