12

I have a subclassed Thread with a private Selector and a public register(SelectableChannel channel, ...) method that allows other threads to register channels to the selector.

As answered here, the channel's register() blocks during selector's select() / select(long timeout) so we need to wakeup() the selector.

My thread selects indefinitely (unless it gets interrupted) and it actually manages to get into the next select before channel's register() is called. So I thought I use a simple lock with synchronized blocks to ensure the register() happens first.

The code: (irrelevant code removed for readability)

public class SelectorThread extends Thread {
  ...

  public void register(SelectableChannel channel, Attachment attachment) throws IOException {
    channel.configureBlocking(false);
    synchronized (this) { // LOCKING OCCURS HERE
      selector.wakeup();
      channel.register(selector,
                       SelectionKey.OP_READ,
                       attachment);
    }
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
    int ready;
    Set<SelectionKey> readyKeys;
    while (!isInterrupted()) {
      synchronized (this) {} // LOCKING OCCURS HERE

      try {
        ready = selector.select(5000);
      } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        continue;
      }

      if (ready == 0) {
        continue;
      }

      readyKeys = selector.selectedKeys();

      for (SelectionKey key : readyKeys) {
        readyKeys.remove(key);

        if (!key.isValid()) {
          continue;
        }

        if (key.isReadable()) {
          ...
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

This simple lock allows register() to happen before the thread continues with the next select loop. As far as I tested, this works as supposed.

Questions: Is that a "good" way to do it or are there any serious downsides to that? Would it be better to use a List or Queue (as suggested here) to store channels for registration, or a more sophisticated lock like this instead? What would the Pros/Cons of that be? Or are there any "even better" ways?

1

4 Answers 4

5

Just treat Selector etc as not thread safe, perform all select related actions on the same thread, as Darron suggested.

The concurrency model of NIO selector is bullshit. I must call it out, because it's a huge waste of time for everyone who try to study it. In the end, the conclusion is, forget it, it's not for concurrent use.

3

I am actually surprised the lock acquisition with the empty block is not removed at compile time. Pretty cool that it works. I mean it works, it's preemptive, it's not the prettiest approach, but it works. It's better than a sleep as it is predictable and since you use the wakeup call you know progress will be made as needed rather than on a periodic update if you purely relied on the select timeout.

The main downside of this approach is that you are saying that calls to register trump anything else, even servicing requests. Which may be true in your system, but usually this is not the case, I would say this is a possible issue. A minor issue which is more forward thinking is that you lock on the SelectorThread itself which is sort of a larger object in this case. Not bad, not great though as you expand, this lock will just have to documented and taken into account whenever other clients use this class. Personally I would go with making another lock altogether to avoid any unforeseen future hazards.

Personally, I like the queuing techniques. They assign roles to your threads, like a master and workers this way. Whereas all types of control happen on the master, like after every select check for more registrations from a queue, clear and farm out any read tasks, handler any changes in the overall connection setup (disconnects etc)... The "bs" concurrency model seems to accept this model pretty well and it's a pretty standard model. I don't think it's a bad thing as it makes the code a bit less hacky, more testable, and easier to read imo. Just takes a little more time to write out.

While I will admit, it has been a long time since I last wrote this stuff, there are other libraries out there that sort of take care of the queueing for you.

Grizzly Nio Framework while a little old, last time I used it, the main runloop was not bad. It setup a lot of the queuing for you.

Apache Mina Similar in that it provides a queuing framework.

But I mean in the end it depends on what you are working on.

  • is it a one man project just to play around with the framework?
  • is it a piece of production code that you want to live on for years?
  • is it a piece of production code that you are iterating on?

Unless you are planning on using this as a core piece of a service you are providing to customers, I would say your approach is fine. It may just have maintenance issues in the long run.

3
  • Very good input for me, thanks. I don't think register trumps servicing, as wakeup only affects waiting selects, not the rest of the loop. As for locking, would it be better to lock on a simple private object instead? (an object solely for locking register calls) I don't expect large amounts of channels to be registered at the same time, so I think a register queue is a bit too much. But I like the idea and might implement it in the future.
    – riha
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 7:45
  • RE: selects and servicing, yeah that's what I mean. Like you will spend an empty cycle just to deal with registration that just happened. Not horrible, but requires the extra lock and immediately dealt with. In the queueing systems you usually have non blocking queues which sort of eleviate the need for these locks. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 14:23
  • RE: the locks, yeah I would make an internal lock that is just for dealing with the selector, personally. But yeah it sounds like you are good to go though. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 14:24
2

All you need is a wakeup() before the register(), and, in the select loop, a short sleep before continuing if 'ready' is zero, to give register() a chance to run. No additional synchronisation: it's bad enough already; don't make it any worse. I'm not a fan of these queues of things to register, cancel, change interest ops, etc: they just sequentialize things that can really be done in parallel.

13
  • Could you please elaborate on how registering channels can really be done in parallel? If registering can only be done on the same thread that also selects, how could that be parallel? Also, what do you consider a "short sleep"? 1ms? 10ms? 100ms?
    – riha
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 7:50
  • 1
    @riha Eh? I haven't said that registering channels can only be done in the select() thread. It can be done on a separate thread, via the technique I have described here, in answer to your question on precisely that topic. Surely that is clear? Re the sleep, 100ms should be enough.
    – user207421
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 8:03
  • 1
    @riha The locks are only there while you're in select(). So, you wakeup the selector to get it out of select(); select() either returns a positive value, in which case the loop has some work to do, during which time you can do your register(), or else it returns zero so you do a short sleep() during which you can do your register().
    – user207421
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 23:38
  • 1
    Now I got your point, thanks for explaining. But I believe the synchronized block has almost the same effect as a short sleep. If there is no work to do, it might even return earlier than from a sleep. A sleep feels like disguised synchronization in that case.
    – riha
    Commented Oct 15, 2012 at 6:00
  • 1
    @riha Even though it's there to delay the synchronisation? Doesn't make any sense to me.
    – user207421
    Commented May 9, 2013 at 23:47
0

A possible way is injecting the channel registration (or other external task that need to be done within the NIO loop) to the selection loop, demo as bellow.

//private final Set<ExternalEvent> externalTaskEvents = ConcurrentHashMap.newKeySet();
//...

while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
    try {
        selector.select();
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace(Log.logWriter);
        return;
    }

    //handle external task events
    Iterator<ExternalEvent> eitr = externalTaskEvents.iterator();
    while (eitr.hasNext()) {
        ExternalEvent event = eitr.next();
        eitr.remove();
        if(event.task != null){
            event.task.accept(event);
        }
    }

    //handle NIO network events
    Iterator<SelectionKey> nitr = selector.selectedKeys().iterator();
    while (nitr.hasNext()) {
        SelectionKey key = nitr.next();
        nitr.remove();
        if (!key.isValid()) {
            continue;
        }
        try {
            if (key.isAcceptable()) {
                onAcceptable(key);
            } else if (key.isConnectable()) {
                onConnectable(key);
            } else {
                if (key.isReadable()) {
                    onReadable(key);
                }
                if (key.isWritable()) {
                    onWritable(key);
                }
            }
        } catch (IOException | InterruptedException | CancelledKeyException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace(Log.logWriter);
            //...
        }
    }
}

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